#1
The guitar salesman said that he would charge me 60$ for a setup, and i want to keep that money for new gear, and he made it look like set up wasnt such a big deal (and i want to know how to do it anyways).

I have a floating bridge Ibanez. If i follow set up tutorials - will i be ok? Im afraid my guitar neck would snap. People make it seem like adjusting the truss rod is guitar suicide.
#2
You can definitely set it up yourself. If you go by quarter turns and give it some time (hour or two, overnight for bigger adjustments) to settle before you turn it again there is no way you could snap the neck.

Even warping the neck would be hard to do unless you were just wrenching it back and forth with no idea what you were doing. Snapping it would be like blowing your car up changing the oil. It just wouldn't happen unless you did something totally absurd.
#3
Buy Dan Erlewine's Guitar Repair guide 1st, read the setup chapter(s) and you should be good to go. Don't mess with anything until you understand what your adjustments are doing.
Moving on.....
#4
Quote by KenG
Buy Dan Erlewine's Guitar Repair guide 1st, read the setup chapter(s) and you should be good to go. Don't mess with anything until you understand what your adjustments are doing.


Before you go out and buy a copy, check your local library.
#5
First thing you need to do is figure out what you're trying to "fix" on your guitar. a set up is a pretty vague term really. What is it about your guitar that makes you think it needs a set up.
#6
You will not break your neck however you could break the truss rod If you do not know what you are doing. There's lots of good books and tons of tutorials on YouTube. The key is to air on the side of caution. As someone else already aluded, your truss rod may not be the issue...and quite likely does not need any adjustment.
#7
Quote by FreshRhubarb
Before you go out and buy a copy, check your local library.


+1
i got mine from my local library a few times and it even came with the CD then bought it after i realized how good of a resource it is. Basically with youtube tutorials and this book you can do a great deal of setup without any issue. learn for yourself and you will always be able to do it. if you run into anything that doesn't seem right or feels awkward when you do it STOP and double check before proceeding.
Quote by BlackVoid
Every guitar and bass forum I've visited has some people chasing some magical tone that will shoot jizzing unicorns riding on a rainbow out of their amp.
#8
paying someone to set up your guitar is the biggest waste of money. look up on youtube how to do it or find some resource online. just turn the rod little in very small amounts and check and your good to go.
#9
Quote by zenbone
+1
i got mine from my local library a few times and it even came with the CD then bought it after i realized how good of a resource it is. Basically with youtube tutorials and this book you can do a great deal of setup without any issue. learn for yourself and you will always be able to do it. if you run into anything that doesn't seem right or feels awkward when you do it STOP and double check before proceeding.


Personally I'm really happy I bought the book. Great resource for those random times you want to look something up to better understand your instrument. Mine has gotten a ton of use
#10
You shouldn't worry about breaking anything.

Only thing you should worry about is the ability to intonate the thing, because that is arguably the hardest to get right.

At least from hearing 50% of people's chords "Wobbling" higher up the neck, but this could be due to poor fret design or technique

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
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Who's Andy Timmons??
#11
There is more to set ups than truss rod adjustments. Don't go turning it unless you know what you're trying to accomplish by doing so.
#12
As has been said previously, "setup" can mean a bunch of things from pretty much irreversible changes like filing the notches in the nut to things that are easily undone like setting the bridge heights and intonation. To be honest, I learned a heck of a lot about my guitars by watching the YouTube videos and doing it myself. I might draw the line at nut filing, though, since this is hard to fix if you file it down too far. On the other hand, at worst, if you mess this up, you learn how to install a new nut, and even a good quality one isn't all that pricey.

I was a total beginner at both setting up and playing, so I took a shot at it. As I got better, I realized things like chords were sounding out of tune because I hadn't paid enough attention to intonation and I was getting a bunch of fret buzz because I went too low on the action. The tone on some of my guitars was harsh and / or muddy because I had the pickups too close (or too far away in some cases). All of these adjustments are nothing more than turning screws, so what the heck. The truss rod is a bit different because going too far here can have serious consequences, but for the rest, go ahead and push them further and further until you go beyond the sweet spot. Only by going past it will you then know where it is and the possible range of sounds you can get. Then dial it back until you're where you want to be.
Last edited by jds2 at Nov 14, 2013,
#13
Quote by FreshRhubarb
Before you go out and buy a copy, check your local library.


I've done that here in LA, and the County library system doesn't have a single copy.



Musicians' Fiend and Walmart will charge you $25.00 for the silly thing, but Abebooks will charge $12.89 (http://www.abebooks.com/Ht-Electric-Guitar-P-Erlwine-Dan/8243784984/bd?cm_mmc=gmc-_-gmc-_-PLA-_-v01 ) a Kindle edition from Amazon will be $9.99, Barnes & Noodle wants $22.49 for the paperback and Amazon has used ones for down around $12-13.

StewMac will sell you a copy for $22.49, too, but it'll be signed by Dan hissowndamnself.
#14
Quote by DUISparky
In 40 odd years I've never paid someone else to set up one of my guitars. It's a waste of money, and who knows what the "expert" is going to screw up while he's fiddling with your axe?


I've gotten into the habit of handing any guitar that's new to me to Gary Brawer for a good initial setup. He'll tell me if the guitar needs a run on the PLEK and a fret superglue, but those are usually in the works and I budget for that when I buy a guitar. So far the only recent purchase I haven't hauled up there for the treatment is a new Variax JTV-89F, which walked in the door set up nearly to perfection and still in tune. Gary knows what my preferences are, and besides, they're stored on the PLEK machine's hard disk.

What I don't do is hand a guitar to a Guitar Splinter "tech" and pay him money to screw up a perfectly good guitar.

After the initial setup, I'll usually do my own setups until and unless, several years down the line, it needs something that I can't figure out.
#15
Set it up yourself. I do that on my guitars. Save money. And its fun to do! Just don't lose your cool, or you may not be happy in the end.
"Go roll around in your sic."- Corey Taylor

Firm hater of the Les Paul. Fan of the Iceman.

You just can't have enough guitars. It is impossible for that to happen.
#16
Whoah so many replies 0.0

I dunno. My teacher said that he doesnt set up his guitar because it cost like 2.5 grand and hes afraid. He said that even Petrucci doesnt set up his guitar by himself.
I thought "man, if petrucci cant do it - how can i?"