#1
Is it okay for the lead guitar to play a note that is used at the same time as the rhythm playing a chord that uses the same note. Is it distinguishable at all that the lead is playing the note or does it just blend in with the chords.
#3
Quote by HotspurJr
Try it and see!

I have, and I sometimes is does or doesn't, and I really don't trust my own judgement at all sadly, which is why i'm posting here .
#4
Yes you can.

If it blends into the background, and you don't want it to, adjust your tone.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
This is my entire approach to soloing my friend. Attacking the chord tones is pretty much the most okay thing you can do.
#6
Not only is it okay, but it almost always does. I've written many entire chunks of song based around a lead guitar playing nothing but chord tones from the rhythm guitar. In fact, almost every time you hear sweep picking, that's exactly what's happening.
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at Nov 15, 2013,
#7
that's why Chord Tone soloing exists.
Someone is wrong on the internet. Only you can help.

Originally Posted by Tulkas
Stairway is required on any list of anything involving the words guitar or song, I believe Congress amended the constitution in order to put it into federal law.
#8
Yes! Just make sure you resolve on the root notes of the scale you are in or you get stuck in a looney tunes moment when you are running min mid air.... been there while performing :-/
#9
Yes, but when I read that I wonder if you mean the root note of the underlying chord or of any chord? If you are just playing the root note then you should try different notes from within the chord as well and then branch out further.

Most harmonies (and chord progressions) are constructed to be based around notes used in the melody and when people write a melody to a chord progression they tend to primarily use notes that come from the chords. This is more than an okay thing to do.
Si
#10
yes
try using notes that extend the chord
like play a B over a Cmaj chord to make the harmoniy more interesting


but yeah let me just tell you know you can do whatever you want whenever you want as long as you like what it sounds
#11
Yes and you should.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
You can and should. Chord tones are the notes you know 100% will fit with the chords. You would be surprised how many great melodies are composed almost entirely from chord tones. All the way back to Bach, the correlation between harmony and melody is fundamental in music.
#13
The scale you choose has to do with the chords you are playing over. If playing chord tones would sound bad, why wouldn't you just choose a random scale and play random notes?

Chord tones are the safest notes to play. They will always sound good over the chords. Also if you play by ear, you will naturally play some chord tones. You will hear if a note fits the chord you are playing over or not. Also, if chord tones weren't important, why wouldn't songs just have random chord progressions?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115