#1
I have my explorer all set up for 46-9 gauges strings, but I wanna start using 48-11s, the problem I'm running into is that my D string saddle is as close to the neck as possible, yet it's still slightly flat. What can I do in this situation? It's an Epiphone Explorer, so cheap tune-o-matic. Would I have to buy a new bridge or what?
#2
If your intonation is flat, the higher tension of the larger string should make it easier for you to bring it up to tune. I think my thinking is right there.

Anyway, with bridge adjustment I've always found it monumentally helpful to just start from scratch. Take the strings off, move all the saddles to the middle, and then string up and adjust as needed. Same concept as unnscrewing the trem claw with a Floyd Rose. Just give the strings fresh space to work with instead of trying to make them work with very limited adjustment space from the get go.
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#3
.011s are not heavy strings. Either the string is bad or the bridge is in the wrong place (very unlikely). Change the strings and reset the saddle positions while the strings are off the guitar.
#4
Well, I haven't even put the 11s on, the D string is still only 26 iirc. I was considering resetting...but I just don't see how that would work, unless the tension on the neck was lessened.

My thinking was that the thicker the string, the shorter the scale needs to be to tune and intonate properly.

But it's likely the intonation issues are caused by the current strings, they're a few months old.
#5
Quote by Velcro Man
Well, I haven't even put the 11s on, the D string is still only 26 iirc. I was considering resetting...but I just don't see how that would work, unless the tension on the neck was lessened.

My thinking was that the thicker the string, the shorter the scale needs to be to tune and intonate properly.

But it's likely the intonation issues are caused by the current strings, they're a few months old.

You could reverse the saddle if the angled side of the saddle is towards the neck. That would give you a little more travel towards the neck.
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#6
Quote by Bertallica
You could reverse the saddle if the angled side of the saddle is towards the neck. That would give you a little more travel towards the neck.


They all point the same direction when flipped. The low strings have the angle to the neck and the three higher ones have the flat end angled.
#7
Try adjusting your truss rod and action
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#8
Quote by RCA1186
Try adjusting your truss rod and action


I'd prefer not to do anything more to my action, but I figured out how to reverse individual saddles, so I shall try that!
#9
Quote by Velcro Man
I'd prefer not to do anything more to my action, but I figured out how to reverse individual saddles, so I shall try that!


like the man said...the thicker string guage should sit higher in the neck and saddles meaning you´ll be have to re-intonate probably leaving you in different saddle positions than now....and

.....when changing string guage you should have to do some minor adjustments to the truss seeing that the the tension is altered with higher string guage changing curvature to the neck. This should also solve your problem with the saddles because when Changes are made to the truss you normally need to go through the set-up again...action included.
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