#1
Hi everyone! my first post here so please be gentle

I have played guitars for eight years now, to cut a very long story short I have literally only just come across scales.

I learnt the minor pentatonic scale in A in the fifth fret position (you know, 5-8, 5-8, 5-7 etc...) As i'm a massive Chuck Berry fan I notice that pretty much every solo follows this pattern, even stuff as "modern" as ACDC follows it bar one or two notes.

The problem is, i'm in a Rockabilly band. So soloing technique is completely different to this style of soloing.

I am asking you guys where do I go next with scales? I want something that will give me good results pretty quickly for my Rockabilly band, but I just don't know what to learn, any why to learn it.


Thank you.
#3
Quote by bartey
Hi everyone! my first post here so please be gentle

I have played guitars for eight years now, to cut a very long story short I have literally only just come across scales.

I learnt the minor pentatonic scale in A in the fifth fret position (you know, 5-8, 5-8, 5-7 etc...) As i'm a massive Chuck Berry fan I notice that pretty much every solo follows this pattern, even stuff as "modern" as ACDC follows it bar one or two notes.

The problem is, i'm in a Rockabilly band. So soloing technique is completely different to this style of soloing.

I am asking you guys where do I go next with scales? I want something that will give me good results pretty quickly for my Rockabilly band, but I just don't know what to learn, any why to learn it.


Thank you.



Find a way to discover the intervals of those notes in the Pentatonic, and then chart out every major 3rds within those scales, and use the minor thirds as passing tones to major 3rds.

If you are more Jazzy rockabilly, consider the root being 1/2 step below the key. These notes will tend to outline notes like Major 3rds, 9ths and the like, depending upon the chords.

Best,

Sean
#4
TS your best bet is to learn some rockabilly stuff and figure out what notes the guitarists opt for. I'm going to guess it's primarily major scales with a whole heap of b5, b3 and b7 accidentals.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Learn the minor pentatonic extension for all root notes, if you know A Minor its easy to shift it around. I found learning the major modes after that opened up the fretboard for me.
#6
Quote by Mesadave
Learn the minor pentatonic extension for all root notes, if you know A Minor its easy to shift it around. I found learning the major modes after that opened up the fretboard for me.

What do you mean by "extension"? Minor pentatonic is all over the fretboard, it's not just one position.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#7
Most guitarists learn the minor pentatonic first, and then the major scale.

I don't really know rockabilly, so I can't give you specific advice for that genre. I can, however, give you advice that will make your life much easier:

You need to get to a place where you let your ear guide you. Given the way you talked about the minor pentatonic, I suspect that you're indulging in shape-based thinking: conceptualizing a scale as a set of safe notes which you can more your fingers more-or-less interchangeably. This must change. You need to think of your scales as a collection of SOUNDS relative to a tonic.

It is crucial, crucial, crucial to develop your ear. Transcribe stuff - start with simple melodies that you know by heart (christmas carols, nursery rhymes, music themes). I found that using the functional ear trainer ( a free download form miles.be ) helped me a lot. This is not an overnight process, but it's hugely important.

Hack guitarists use scale shapes as cookie cutters, and when they want a new sound they learn a new shape. Good guitarists train their ears and let their minds and ears direct their solo. They think in sounds - there's a sound you want to hear and you find it on the guitar. This sort of feels like hearing the sound in advance, although that's not quite it.

Somebody else may be able to give you some shortcut tips on rockabilly, but whatever you do, start this process of moving beyond shapes, start training your ear. Start today. It opens up a whole new world to you.