#1
I'm just here to post something that I have discovered that works for me really well. For the longest time I've been trying to find a way to beef up a single tracked direct input recording. Every little "Trick" I've found on the internet still makes my guitar tracks sound weak and not full. The way I have fixed this problem is that i copy and paste the track so that it's on SIX different tracks. I pan them: 100% Left. 40% Left. 20% Left. 100% Right. 40% right. and 20% left. After doing the panning like this, the volume will be extremely high, so you're going to ave to adjust the volume of each track accordingly. I also add a LITTLE bit more drive/gain to each individual track. This trick works for me and I hope it is useful for all of you c:
#2
I am fairly sure you're just making the track louder. It's remotely possible that crosstalk between speakers/ears might help it sound bigger, but realistically it's just louder. Double tracking is the way forward.
#3
I'm kinda new to recording. I was just posting because this seems to work for me i mean, it sounds nice and it feels really thick to me i know double tracking is the way to go, but for some songs it can be fairly difficult
#4
It doesn't work.

Sorry to burst your bubble. All you're doing by copying and pasting is making the track louder, each copy gives a few DB boost, all you're doing it making it louder AND reducing stereo field. No matter how far you pan two identical part's they'll still be mono, simply because the same thing is coming out of both speakers.

If you're not going to double track, then don't bother. Sorry to be harsh, but it's just gotta be done. If you can't double track your parts, then you need to learn them better!
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#5
I'm a big fan of adding a million layers but I'm going to play devil's advocate...

IF you can't add different tracks because you don't know your own song.... then no one can help you :P BUT I can see how it's possible that you're stuck with one good sounding track because the guitarist left town or you have work to do and can't get the artist to record again...

I would say put two tracks on each side. On each side you'll have two tracks with your basic tone that you're going for.... For each other track you can go a bit crazy. For example put a high pass filter and a delay on one and an octave fuzz and a phaser on the other one. That way the effects are going to be semi obvious without taking away from the original tone, no matter what it may be.

But yeah... record your lines a million times
#6
I understand where you guys are coming from. But like whenever i tell anyone i'm recording we need to double/triple/quad track they give me all kinds of excuses and we always end up only doing one track. But thank you guys for giving me a better understanding that what i was doing was incorrect! From now on im going to be like "Double track or gtfo"
#7
Quote by BrandonATFT
I understand where you guys are coming from. But like whenever i tell anyone i'm recording we need to double/triple/quad track they give me all kinds of excuses and we always end up only doing one track. But thank you guys for giving me a better understanding that what i was doing was incorrect! From now on im going to be like "Double track or gtfo"

Triple/Quad is meh, unless they're super tight then it'll probably make it sound messier so it's not worth it. If they can't play consistently enough to double track they have no business being in a studio of any sort.
#8
Quote by BrandonATFT
I understand where you guys are coming from. But like whenever i tell anyone i'm recording we need to double/triple/quad track they give me all kinds of excuses and we always end up only doing one track. But thank you guys for giving me a better understanding that what i was doing was incorrect! From now on im going to be like "Double track or gtfo"


You should really be doing plenty of takes anyway, so just get them to do a couple more and you'll get a second track from it without them even knowing

EDIT but if you want to be honest then get them to play you some of their favourite heavier songs and show them that they are all double tracked (they pretty much will be every time...)
Last edited by tim_mop at Nov 20, 2013,
#9
Try this:

Copy and paste the track, and pan each to a side, like you were saying.

Pitch-shift one up 2 cents. Pitch-shift the other down 2 cents.

Delay one of them somewhere in the neighbourhood of 10 ms.

It won't be the same as real double-tracking, but it won't be the same as what you were talking about either. I've used that technique to fatten up vocals before quite successfully. I think I've done it on guitars too.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

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