#1
Hello,

Could anyone clarify the difference between the two types of Elixir strings (polyweb & nanoweb)?

The Elixir website doesn't seem to offer much indication of this!

Thanks in advance,

Al
#3
Quote by NikFire89
http://www.elixirstrings.co.uk/faq.html

There's the info you need mate.

The only thing you could deduce from the names without that info is "nano" and "poly" - nano being a thinner coating and poly being thicker, which the site states.

This.

Elixir brought out the polywebs first... and then, for some reason, made the nanowebs with a thinner coating that is significantly less durable, as a replacement for the polywebs. I genuinely suspect this is because the polywebs lasted so long it hurt the sales because people didn't need to buy them as regularly

The Nanowebs still outlast just about any other set of strings though, in my experience.

There is one important thing to look out for if you're buying elixir strings though - make sure you buy sets with the "ANTI-RUST" label on the packaging.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#4
Can't say I have played Nanowebs (as far as I remember), but the thing that got me with Elixir strings is they never had that initial brightness of a non-coated string - maybe the Nanowebs do and that is what they have tried to achieve with them.

I also expect that the coating on Nanowebs is slightly less durable so they may not outlast the Polywebs. Can't say I've tried or tested this theory out though.
#5
Really Nik? No initial brightness? I find they still have that snappy new string tone personally. Not only that, but the tone stays around much longer as well. Im using the nanowebs and they still last for ages.
#6
I hate those strings, any coated string. Unless you really need coated because of sweat or humidity they should be avoided IMO. Normal strings are better tone, better harmonics, much cheaper, so claiming they last longer, same price. Also they get little balls of coating near the frets sometimes sooner than normal stings would die. As for them still looking good after a long time not playing, fine, if you hardly ever play the guitar they make some sense, but even great looking strings with no dirt can be stretched and dented and useless, all strings need replacing every 100 hrs or so, so why pay 3 times the price for less tone.
#8
I play guitar in a metal band live often in the summer time when it is really humid and after every concert I would have to change my dunlop strings due to the quick rusting, so I switched to using Elixer nanoweb anti-rust strings and they do last a lot longer under high humidity from what I have seen... but the one issue I noticed is that my high E develops a patch of rust where my pick usually hits the string. After cleaning it carefull I noticed it is a bit thinner than the rest of the string and catches the pick when I try to do any tremolo picking. Anyone else ever had any problem like this with them?
#9
Quote by Vodkamizer
I play guitar in a metal band live often in the summer time when it is really humid and after every concert I would have to change my dunlop strings due to the quick rusting, so I switched to using Elixer nanoweb anti-rust strings and they do last a lot longer under high humidity from what I have seen... but the one issue I noticed is that my high E develops a patch of rust where my pick usually hits the string. After cleaning it carefull I noticed it is a bit thinner than the rest of the string and catches the pick when I try to do any tremolo picking. Anyone else ever had any problem like this with them?


Do not clean your strings, you're rubbing off the coating.


I agree with Blompcube, it's probably because polywebs lasted too long. This is the only thing I agree on with that rude shithead called Scott Grove.