#1
I'm self-taught. I've been playing a little over 2 years. I started on a cheap steel string electric/acoustic (Ibanez AE5). After a couple months, I bought a used classical guitar / nylon string because I was reading articles on classical technique. I also bought an electric guitar (Epiphone SG400).

Well, as it turns out I spend 90% of my time playing on the classical, simply because I can do it anywhere without plugging in. And when I play the classical, I'm not using a pick, just kind of ad hoc finger picking or strumming. I keep telling myself I need to pick up the electric more, to learn more technique like for solos, shredding and such (alt picking, sweep picking, playing high on the neck).

When I do pick it up, the narrower neck is a bit of a challenge, my chords sound rough, my intonation with the pick does not sound very good, etc. So I'm thinking I may just need to ban myself from picking up the classical at all, to force myself to develop better technique with a pick, and on the electric in general. Cause if I tell myself I'll do both, I just end up picking up the classical and never getting to the electric.

I guess I'm looking for two things:

First, moral support, like if other people have had this sort of issue and had to do something similar, and it worked for them, or

Two, maybe a fresh perspective on things, maybe there's another approach that I can use to help motivate me to play the electric.

I've been doing a lot of song-writing lately, and in my head I hear the songs as rock, or alt rock, songs, but I'm working them out on classical guitar. And if I try playing them on the electric, the recordings such because of my technical weaknesses, so I wind up programming the songs as midi electronica, cause I want to hear how the melodies and chords go together... Basically, my technical weakness on electric guitar has me producing my songs in a whole different genre. I'd like to remedy this so I can record my rock songs playing electric guitar. (I've even looked into synth VSTi's that can mimic electric guitar tones, but I'm not happy with any of the one's I've found, and it seems a bit of a cop out since I can play guitar, and have an electric guitar.)

Ken

https://soundcloud.com/kenmyers-1
#2
Well it's whatever your use to, so if you want to get more familiar with the electric guitar then yes don't play your classical 90% of the time . Do 50/50, common sense really.
#3
I guess I was hoping for stories of people who had to do similar stuff, to get over using a crutch, or expand their skill set, or whatever. Again, kind of a moral support thing.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#4
You don't need to stop playing your classical guitar to get better at electric. You just need to play your electric.
#5
Play both. Research Randy Rhoads if you are unaware of who he is. He is someone who used Classical ideas in a Electric Guitar Rock n Roll way.
#7
Quote by Nanobotter
they are both the same instrument....



My god, this is the most stupid comment I have ever seen...


They are both guitars, not the same instrument. They require very different techniques and are designed for types of music.


To the OP, I would suggest you play the electric more to begin with to adjust properly to a different playing style. If you play both equally it is likely you will play the electric in the mindset of a playing an acoustic or classical and will likely end up reverting entirely back to acoustic through preference or frustration

Don't isolate one from the other but I really do suggest playing the electric a fair bit more to begin with to build up consistent technique and understanding of how the electric plays.
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#8
Play them both. I have a selection of guitars (and other instruments) Play the electric mainly but still do 20% practice time on your classical as "maintenance" but keep swapping them so you get used to changing from one to the other.
#9
Quote by triface
You don't need to stop playing your classical guitar to get better at electric. You just need to play your electric.


that's what i was gonna say

captain obvious to the rescue, but yeah. sometimes it really is that simple.

Quote by ProgFripp74

They are both guitars, not the same instrument. They require very different techniques and are designed for types of music.


yeah- heck even different electrics can feel different enough that if you played one exclusively for long enough you'd struggle on the other. I remember when I started playing guitar and only had one electric I had a heck of a time playing anything else
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#10
Quote by ProgFripp74
My god, this is the most stupid comment I have ever seen...


They are both guitars, not the same instrument. They require very different techniques and are designed for types of music.




This. Both guitars, but require very different skills and technical approaches

I consider myself intermediate - advanced on the electric guitar, mainly with heavy metal at least as it's pretty much my forte, however when it comes to classical i would never consider myself anything beyond intermediate. I approach the instrument completely different to an electric guitar.
#11
Play both

last month i picked up my classical guitar (it was my first guitar ) a 50$ guitar with a crack near the sound hole and it made me forget about my electric and my acoustic guitar for two weeks

acoustic or classic well help you in general with your playing skills
#12
You should try to listen to more music with electric guitar parts, and then you'll be more inclined to play with your SG
#14
Keep up the classical and you'll have some fantastic technique, but only if you sit down and work stuff out on the electric guitar, too. Technique isn't just being good at moving your hands, it's about how you approach the music with them, and that's what transfers.