#1
i want to replace the strings of my acoustic guitar. i just noticed that it began to sound bad when i recently changed some of the strings after they snapped. my guitar is a SX dreadnought and the body is made of basswood. so, i don't know what gauge and brand of strings to buy that will have great clarity sound. by the way, i more of a rhythm guitarist and i do a little bit of fingerstyle. please help me guys, i appreciate it. thanks
#2
string opinions vary greatly. its up to you to try some and see what works for you. the 2 most popular are Elixir and D'addarion. if you want to bring out the dread's strengths, i'd recommend a set of medium gauge strings to get the boom that guitar was designed for.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#3
Master info thread on front page has heaps of info. cheers
#4
Quote by ninetyseven
i want to replace the strings of my acoustic guitar. i just noticed that it began to sound bad when i recently changed some of the strings after they snapped.
Well, better way, way, too late, than never I suppose.

Quote by ninetyseven
my guitar is a SX dreadnought and the body is made of basswood. so, i don't know what gauge and brand of strings to buy that will have great clarity sound. by the way, i more of a rhythm guitarist and i do a little bit of fingerstyle. please help me guys, i appreciate it. thanks
D'addario & Elixir are the too most popular brands. Step's a burly guy with good guitars. For this reason, I'm gong to suggest you start out with "acoustic lights" ( about .012 to .053) as most makers ship with that gauge to protect the guitar. They'll give you plenty of "boom" from a big body guitar.

What you need to sort out, is which alloy suits your taste and guitar the best. There are basically two choices. Either "phosphor bronze", (warm, sort of mellow), or "brass" 80/20 (bell bronze alloy), which are fairly bright and chimey.

There's no real way of getting around trying one set of each to sort it out.

BTW, I've never heard of a maker actually admitting to using "basswood" as a B&S material. Solid body electrics though, I sure have.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 23, 2013,
#5
[quote="Captaincranky
BTW, I've never heard of a maker actually admitting to using "basswood" as a B&S material. Solid body electrics though, I sure have.[/QUOTE"]

Actually, i just searched the type of wood used online. I saw the same brand and model of my guitar online and assumed the specs are similar to mine.

I was thinking of getting phosphorous bronze 80/20 and maybe i'll go for a medium gauge? From what my cousin told me, light gauge strings have little volume and that's how my guitar sounded even before all the snapping of the strings. So i'm guessing the snapped strings were light gauge type. I wanted a bolder sound with good clarity that sounds soothing to my ears. I don't know how to explain the sound that i want to achieve but it's the famous acoustic sound that we often here from bands and singers and sungha jung hahaha.

Or might as well just try your suggestions and see what satisfies me. I'm so demanding and i'm very sorry about that. Oh, thanks, btw.
#6
Quote by ninetyseven
....[ ]... I was thinking of getting phosphorous bronze 80/20 and maybe i'll go for a medium gauge? From what my cousin told me, light gauge strings have little volume and that's how my guitar sounded even before all the snapping of the strings. So i'm guessing the snapped strings were light gauge type. I wanted a bolder sound with good clarity that sounds soothing to my ears. I don't know how to explain the sound that i want to achieve but it's the famous acoustic sound that we often here from bands and singers and sungha jung hahaha.

Or might as well just try your suggestions and see what satisfies me. I'm so demanding and i'm very sorry about that. Oh, thanks, btw.
So we're clear, "acoustic light sets", encompass string diameters from .012 to .053. Acoustic medium goes from .013 to .056. There are two commonly available sets LIGHTER than acoustic light which are, "custom light", (.011 to .052), and "extra light", (.010 to .047).

IMHO, is you can rip the .012's off, you're a better man than me, and harder on guitars as well. Excessive string breakage is oftentimes caused by sharp edges on tuners or other places..

Tradition has it that "bold but mellow", are adjectives normally found in televised coffee advertisements. But since we're going down that route, I'll paraphrase a very old "Exedrine" commercial for you. "How do you spell relief from mediocre sound and painful string breakage"? "$$$$$$$$$$$", that's how I spell relief...

Some people spell it, "Taylor, Martin, Gibson, Breedlove, and even "Seagull", and yet you still have to experiment with string brands, alloys, and gauges, to get the very best from those high end brands.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 23, 2013,
#7
the mediums will give it more volume. you'll lose a bit of clarity, for that you'd want the lights. the mediums will be harder to fret however. but that just takes a little getting used to. some medium PB's like d'addario's EXP17's maybe?
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#9
I have another question. I'm still new to this kind of string so i've been surfing the net and i often saw a set of string numbers like 20 40 60 80 100? Idk what they are. Also, can you combine light and medium gauge. For example, using light gauge in the basses and the rest are medium gauge? Thanks again and i already bought varied strings that you suggested. I bought light and medium ones.
#10
Quote by ninetyseven
I have another question. I'm still new to this kind of string so i've been surfing the net and i often saw a set of string numbers like 20 40 60 80 100? Idk what they are. Also, can you combine light and medium gauge. For example, using light gauge in the basses and the rest are medium gauge? Thanks again and i already bought varied strings that you suggested. I bought light and medium ones.
Some string makers sell sets like that, "light top, heavy bottom". I've actually seen strings being sold under that banner.

I'm not exactly sure what you mean when you're talking about "numbers", but I'm guessing that you're seeing the string diameters published for every string in the set.

For example: .012, .016, .024, .032, .042, .053 would be the individual "gauges" of each string in a D'Addario "acoustic light" set. In this context, "Gauge", and "diameter", are interchangeable as definitions. However, the term ,"gauge" is often used to indicate diameter in smaller wire sizes. That follows true, even in home wiring applications.

If you went to the hardware store, you would find a "one inch diameter pipe", but a "10 gauge wire". (Note too, although it is stating the obvious, the wire is solid, but the pipe is hollow). Electrical wire is also gauged, and can be made up of multiple strands.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 24, 2013,