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#1
My 14 year old son has expressed an interest in learning the guitar.

I wanted to as a teen but was discouraged by my parents....too loud.....too expensive....etc.

I think we'll learn together. Gonna get signed up on some lessons for both of us.


My son and I went to a couple of local music stores that a couple of my buddies recommended....last weekend.


I went to a buddies house yesterday and tinkered around with some of his gear. He has a band and has a recording studio set up in a free standing building in his backyard. It's really nice. I'm looking forward to spending many future hours there.


Anyway, back to the best music store today and I decided to hook both my son and I up with some gear to get started:


  • Squier Affinity HSS Stratocaster & Epiphone Les Paul Special II
  • Fender Mustang II V2
  • Fender Mustang III V2



I know that I need a pair of guitar stands, cables, gig bags (for when we go to lessons) and some picks.

How did I do for starters?


What else can you recommend????


I'm thinking about getting my son the GuitarSmith 2014 for his PS3 for a Christmas gift.


He's just discovering good music. He asked me the other day, "Dad, have you ever heard of a band named Iron Maiden?".


My reply, "Yes son......I saw them in 1984".
Last edited by DubfromGA at Nov 23, 2013,
#2


All around awesome, dude. It sounds like you're going about this right!
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#3
I would've gotten two of the Squiers instead of the LP Special, TBH. Not a huge fan of the Special. A few buddies of mine had them years ago when we started and they didn't last very long.
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#4
That's awesome that you and your son are going to be learning together. I've got no experience with GuitarSmith, but I guess it couldn't hurt. The biggest help will obviously be the lessons. I know the beginning can be boring, and you'll both want to jump right into playing songs (I think when I started the first song I tried to learn was Stairway to Heaven ), but take the needed time to learn your open chords and note positions on the fretboard; you'd be surprised with how far that takes you.

Gear wise, for having never played the guitar, the Mustang amps should be fine. We can have a long talk much farther down the road about tube amps, but for now that's completely unnecessary. I'm guessing you'll want a second guitar so that you can both play. I'd look into the Squier Classic Vibe or Vintage Modified series of guitars. Really great bang for your buck in those, a better value than the lower end MIM Fenders IMO. The Affinity Strat you have is ok for a first guitar, but they can be hit or miss.

For cables, please stay away from Monster, overpriced garbage. I'd recommend Planet Waves, Mogami, and Lava. Hope some of that helps.

Edit: Just saw you also got the Epiphone. Like Matt said, probably would've gone with two Squiers. In that price range the Squiers beat out the Epiphones.
Last edited by chip46 at Nov 23, 2013,
#5
That should work fine for a first rig.
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#6
should work great

I think the program is Rocksmith, not Guitarsmith but whatever. We know what you mean.

I'd maybe consider a Peavey Vypyr for one of the amps instead of two mustangs just to give you more variety. The Vypyr 'may' be better for metal tones too, like Iron Maiden

How much were those Mustangs can I ask?

PS: We have a fairly extensive lesson, tablature and technique sections on this site you may find helpful as well.

Good luck
#7
Thanks for the comments.


We are both really stoked about this. The Squier Strat is for him. I chose the Epi LP for my own starter so that we'd have two different feeling guitars to play around with. I figured a licensed Strat and LP would be good places to start.


I was able to get the LP for $149 new, so I was very comfortable with this.


All my buddies who are avid players told be that I'd be buying tube amps if either of us really got into playing.


For now, though, I felt the Mustangs offered a nice range of sounds that could be enjoyed at low practice volumes....something that was a must when my wife is around the house.


I truly hope that this winds up being a bit hit and that we both take it as far as we can.

I'd love to covert our garage into a great practice room in the future.....I'd could see lining the walls and roll up door with acoustic panels and putting in an a/c and fans.


As far as cables.....10' should be long enough for his bedroom amp.....I'm thinking an 18' for our other area. Does the longer cable degrade the signal or does this sound like a wise plan?
#8
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
should work great

I think the program is Rocksmith, not Guitarsmith but whatever. We know what you mean.

I'd maybe consider a Peavey Vypyr for one of the amps instead of two mustangs just to give you more variety. The Vypyr 'may' be better for metal tones too, like Iron Maiden

How much were those Mustangs can I ask?

PS: We have a fairly extensive lesson, tablature and technique sections on this site you may find helpful as well.

Good luck



Yup.....I goofed....it is Rocksmith 2014.


The Mustang II v2 was $200 and the Mustang III v3 was $300.


I need to get some gig bags for lesson days.


Does it hurt to simply leave the guitars on the stands most of the time?
#9
If the cable's good, 10' or 18' or 99' will not make any appreciable difference.

Edit: unless you live your guitars in a heavily umid or heavily dry place and you don't put it near a window or someplace where the temperature changes a lot from day to night and so on, they will be allright on the stands.

Have fun, both of you!
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Last edited by Spambot_2 at Nov 23, 2013,
#10
Quote by Spambot_2
If the cable's good, 10' or 18' or 99' will not make any appreciable difference.

Edit: unless you live your guitars in a heavily umid or heavily dry place and you don't put it near a window or someplace where the temperature changes a lot from day to night and so on, they will be allright on the stands.

Have fun, both of you!



Excellent.


Thank you!!!!
#11
HNGD and good luck with the family band! My parents encouraged me to play but stuck me in the garage once I got my first amp. If you play too, your son can learn while bankrolled and warm, haha, very cool.

I agree with 311 and woulda got 2 different amps though.
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#12
Quote by lucky1978
HNGD and good luck with the family band! My parents encouraged me to play but stuck me in the garage once I got my first amp. If you play too, your son can learn while bankrolled and warm, haha, very cool.

I agree with 311 and woulda got 2 different amps though.



Thanks.

I'm really looking forward to us learning together. One of the coolest benefits is that my son has been showing an interest in the music I grew up with: AC/DC, KISS, Iron Maiden, Metallica, Nugent and etc.

I'm getting my iTunes library built up with some good stuff. Working on a playlist for him on his old Nano. Thankfully, he said he wanted to get rid of the "junk" he had on there. I'm stoked.

I really didn't do much looking around for amps or gear...I went with some recommendations from some buddies who play. We have a couple local music stores, one really nice one in particular and they matched any online price. I'll also be using them for lessons, too.


I liked the idea of us being able to get the approximate feels of the Strat and LP and develop our preferences from there.


I'm really hoping that he sticks with it and next year is begging me for his next guitar......next amp.....etc.
#13
You know it's so good hearing a kid get into Iron Maiden. Huge fan, seen them a couple of times.

Good gear choices though! But if he likes Maiden, I would have considered the Peavey Vypyr as 311 said, but for starting out the gear is perfect. Wish I had gear like that when I was 14.
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#14
Your friends suck, man!

Introducing you to the horrors and hedonistic lifestyle of guitar Gear Acquisition Syndrome? Those aren't friends. Those are tone dealers, looking for their next junkie. It sounds like you feel for it hard.

Next thing you know, you'll be meeting them in the dark, alleyways for your next tone fix, or meeting them at the sleazy local GuitarCentre.

Don't let your wife catch you looking up guitar porn on www.proguitarshop.com, you'll be sleeping on the couch for days.

Next thing you know, you'll be selling tones for your next fix. "Hey man, I have some chunky rhythms for $19. Finger an E minor? Sure, that'll be $5 a peep, you perv."

Shame on you for bringing your firstborn into this sleazy world with you. Shame.



On a serious note, I think you could have done better with the guitar and the amp.

THAT SAID, you definitely could have done considerably, significantly and horribly worse with your choice in gear.

I wouldn't have picked up 2 Mustangs. Maybe a Vox Valvetronix or a Peavy Vypyr would have added some variety. Similarly, I might have picked up something like an LTD for the EP and a Yamaha Pacifica for the strat.

However, for a starter that bought those gear, I think you definitely made a good start. Maybe not ZEE BEST, but definitely a very smart choice.

Just some advice.

1. When first starting out, resist launching straight into a song at your first attempt. Learn the chords and the fretboard, and commit it to memory. Yeah it might be a little dull, but those are the foundations, without them, you'll stall at the later points when what you want to do is rock out.

2. Pick up Fretboard Logic... that teaches the CAGED system and if you can plough though the majority of it, you'll be well equipped to learn 60% of most songs on the market.

3. While practice is good. Commit some time to basic things like warm ups, finger exercises each time before you start.

4. Set aside at least 5 ~ 7 hours of serious practice each week. Commit to it consistently and regularly.

5. Don't sweat the technical aspects of guitaring. There's no need to focus on picking up all the technical aspects of playing until you encounter them in songs.

6. Get a metronome or a drum machine. A drum machine is more interesting as you can program it to get rhythm beats to play along to. I usually fall asleep when a metronome is going on.

7. Once you get chords and some basic songs going, try to find friends to practice with you. A band progresses significantly faster than individual playing alone.

Just some tips I had to learn the hard way when I started.

As a side note, you rock man, encouraging and learning with your kid? That's awesome.
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#15
Quote by ragingkitty
Your friends suck, man!

Introducing you to the horrors and hedonistic lifestyle of guitar Gear Acquisition Syndrome? Those aren't friends. Those are tone dealers, looking for their next junkie. It sounds like you feel for it hard.

Next thing you know, you'll be meeting them in the dark, alleyways for your next tone fix, or meeting them at the sleazy local GuitarCentre.

Don't let your wife catch you looking up guitar porn on www.proguitarshop.com, you'll be sleeping on the couch for days.

Next thing you know, you'll be selling tones for your next fix. "Hey man, I have some chunky rhythms for $19. Finger an E minor? Sure, that'll be $5 a peep, you perv."

Shame on you for bringing your firstborn into this sleazy world with you. Shame.



On a serious note, I think you could have done better with the guitar and the amp.

THAT SAID, you definitely could have done considerably, significantly and horribly worse with your choice in gear.

I wouldn't have picked up 2 Mustangs. Maybe a Vox Valvetronix or a Peavy Vypyr would have added some variety. Similarly, I might have picked up something like an LTD for the EP and a Yamaha Pacifica for the strat.

However, for a starter that bought those gear, I think you definitely made a good start. Maybe not ZEE BEST, but definitely a very smart choice.

Just some advice.

1. When first starting out, resist launching straight into a song at your first attempt. Learn the chords and the fretboard, and commit it to memory. Yeah it might be a little dull, but those are the foundations, without them, you'll stall at the later points when what you want to do is rock out.

2. Pick up Fretboard Logic... that teaches the CAGED system and if you can plough though the majority of it, you'll be well equipped to learn 60% of most songs on the market.

3. While practice is good. Commit some time to basic things like warm ups, finger exercises each time before you start.

4. Set aside at least 5 ~ 7 hours of serious practice each week. Commit to it consistently and regularly.

5. Don't sweat the technical aspects of guitaring. There's no need to focus on picking up all the technical aspects of playing until you encounter them in songs.

6. Get a metronome or a drum machine. A drum machine is more interesting as you can program it to get rhythm beats to play along to. I usually fall asleep when a metronome is going on.

7. Once you get chords and some basic songs going, try to find friends to practice with you. A band progresses significantly faster than individual playing alone.

Just some tips I had to learn the hard way when I started.

As a side note, you rock man, encouraging and learning with your kid? That's awesome.



Thank you a ton. I appreciate your comments and insight.

This forum is going to be very, very helpful. I wish I'd have known about it sooner....before plunking down any $$$.


I'll certainly look into Fretboard logic.

I've got a couple pards to play with and so does my son.....we just want to get up and running a bit before we drive them nuts with our beginner's issues. One of my buddies has a few easier songs suggested that I learn the basics for. He wants to get together and he'll do the leads. Sounds like fun.
#16
Quote by DubfromGA
Thank you a ton. I appreciate your comments and insight.

This forum is going to be very, very helpful. I wish I'd have known about it sooner....before plunking down any $$$.


I'll certainly look into Fretboard logic.

I've got a couple pards to play with and so does my son.....we just want to get up and running a bit before we drive them nuts with our beginner's issues. One of my buddies has a few easier songs suggested that I learn the basics for. He wants to get together and he'll do the leads. Sounds like fun.


I wouldn't say that you'd drive them crazy, but if they're serious about integrating you, they'd set you up with some basic songs and some riffs, nothing too hard.

What is more important is for you and your kid to remain engaged and to continually improve. A supportive band that keeps you wanting to better yourself can do wonders to your standard and speed of improvement.
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#17
The Rocksmith sounds like a great idea.

Be selective about tutors out there, there are a whole lot of bad tutors out there and they will discourage you from playing when playing should always be fun.

Some starter books for you and maybe your son are:

"Everything you ever wanted to know about guitar but were afraid to ask."

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Guitarists-Everything-Wanted/dp/063406651X

It's a horrible title for a really, really, really great book on the fundamentals. Take notes with it and have fun with it.

Another fun plan is to play scales over practice track music. Here is a link to scales and practice track. Just play the finger board where the dots are and you can make music.

http://www.bestbackingtracks.com/scales/scales-for-guitar

The song will have the key listed on the title, find the key and play along the dots and now you have music.

Remember, music should always be fun.

Now people will disagree but I don't recommend learning to read music at all. The guitar just wasn't met for it. The Guitar is older than music notation. This is coming from a guy who can easily play clarinet and saxophone music and some piano music but notation was made for it.

As for a tutor, run away from anyone who starts throwing numbers at you. I would always go to a tutor short term and with a plan. "I want better strumming technique," or, "I want better chord changing technique." Always have a plan. If you find a good tutor stick with him.

I hope this helps.
#18
Also, watch out for rigid people in guitar. You are going to run into a lot of rigid people in the guitar world. They zap the fun away from the music. I'm not certain why that is the case in the guitar world, it's not the case in other instruments. So, don't take it personally.

Another fun activity is just noodle around the guitar. If it sounds good its music.
#19
Badass father right there. The gear you picked will be just fine for starting off. Once you have some experience and the both of you feel like youve narrowed down the tones and styles you want to pursue youll want to upgrade. When that time comes we can all help you find the best gear for the money.
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#20
Quote by antics32
The Rocksmith sounds like a great idea.

Be selective about tutors out there, there are a whole lot of bad tutors out there and they will discourage you from playing when playing should always be fun.

Some starter books for you and maybe your son are:

"Everything you ever wanted to know about guitar but were afraid to ask."

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-Guitarists-Everything-Wanted/dp/063406651X

It's a horrible title for a really, really, really great book on the fundamentals. Take notes with it and have fun with it.

Another fun plan is to play scales over practice track music. Here is a link to scales and practice track. Just play the finger board where the dots are and you can make music.

http://www.bestbackingtracks.com/scales/scales-for-guitar

The song will have the key listed on the title, find the key and play along the dots and now you have music.

Remember, music should always be fun.

Now people will disagree but I don't recommend learning to read music at all. The guitar just wasn't met for it. The Guitar is older than music notation. This is coming from a guy who can easily play clarinet and saxophone music and some piano music but notation was made for it.

As for a tutor, run away from anyone who starts throwing numbers at you. I would always go to a tutor short term and with a plan. "I want better strumming technique," or, "I want better chord changing technique." Always have a plan. If you find a good tutor stick with him.

I hope this helps.

I don't want to start an argument but I don't know how reading music for guitar is any harder than for any other instrument.

You already knew how to read music before you started playing the guitar. Maybe you just didn't bother to learn to read the notation for guitar (I'm also a multi instrumentalist and knew how to read the notation before starting to play the guitar and just didn't bother to learn to read the notation for guitar - I mean, I of course could read music for guitar but it would be pretty slow)? Classical guitarists only use notation - I don't think they use tabs. And it's good to know how notation works. Without notation it's hard to understand music theory. Of course it doesn't need to be the first thing to learn but I wouldn't say don't learn it at all. Learn it if you feel like it and if you want to know anything about music theory.

I also don't agree with practicing scales, unless you know why you want to practice them. Start practicing scales when you feel like it. They aren't needed to learn your favorite songs. Playing scales up and down can just take the fun out of guitar playing. I never really practiced scales on guitar.

First things I would learn are basic chords. Then I would learn to play songs using those chords. Playing songs is what you want to do. Exercises are useful but not the most fun thing. So do exercises to be able to learn a song, not just for the sake of doing exercises (you could even use a song or a part of a song as an exercise). IMO it's always good to know why you do something.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#21
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I don't want to start an argument but I don't know how reading music for guitar is any harder than for any other instrument.

You already knew how to read music before you started playing the guitar. Maybe you just didn't bother to learn to read the notation for guitar (I'm also a multi instrumentalist and knew how to read the notation before starting to play the guitar and just didn't bother to learn to read the notation for guitar - I mean, I of course could read music for guitar but it would be pretty slow)? Classical guitarists only use notation - I don't think they use tabs. And it's good to know how notation works. Without notation it's hard to understand music theory. Of course it doesn't need to be the first thing to learn but I wouldn't say don't learn it at all. Learn it if you feel like it and if you want to know anything about music theory.

I also don't agree with practicing scales, unless you know why you want to practice them. Start practicing scales when you feel like it. They aren't needed to learn your favorite songs. Playing scales up and down can just take the fun out of guitar playing. I never really practiced scales on guitar.

First things I would learn are basic chords. Then I would learn to play songs using those chords. Playing songs is what you want to do. Exercises are useful but not the most fun thing. So do exercises to be able to learn a song, not just for the sake of doing exercises (you could even use a song or a part of a song as an exercise). IMO it's always good to know why you do something.


No argument started, just good discussion. On Piano, Clarinet and Saxophone one note corresponds to exactly one tone in only one way. This is not the case for guitar. I have a tough time bothering to read music because I have to get into the composers head to see which groupings of notes are meant at which area of the neck.

As for scales, I wouldn't bothering to practice them at first either. But you can use scale charts over practice track music to play over it. Rocksmith 2014 does this but only in a limited way using their jam feature.

Thanks for the input.
#22
i would normally say to aim a little higher if your not strapped for cash, also hard that you have to buy 2x of everything.

just like everything else. you start getting the bug and 6 months down the road you want a 500 dollar guitar, but then this 700 dollar guitar and something else, 2 years later 1500 dollar guitar....and then you have committed and you want something "special" 2500 dollar guitar.

luckily i made 3 jumps. squier, higher end epiphone, top end carvin. a lot less than most. now i am pretty much committed to buying only quality gear or not at all (like i want a guitar with a floyd on it, but i am not buying the cheapest ibanez or something).
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#24
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
The point is to do what you are comfortable with and have fun doing. Everyone's advice on what to focus on for starting out is going to be different. There is no wrong way or right way.

+1
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#25
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
The point is to do what you are comfortable with and have fun doing. Everyone's advice on what to focus on for starting out is going to be different. There is no wrong way or right way.

+2

The idea for now is just to make it fun and convince yourself, and your son, it's worth the effort... Once you establish that you can get more serious about it, but for now just focus on having fun.
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Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#26
Quote by antics32
No argument started, just good discussion. On Piano, Clarinet and Saxophone one note corresponds to exactly one tone in only one way. This is not the case for guitar. I have a tough time bothering to read music because I have to get into the composers head to see which groupings of notes are meant at which area of the neck.

As for scales, I wouldn't bothering to practice them at first either. But you can use scale charts over practice track music to play over it. Rocksmith 2014 does this but only in a limited way using their jam feature.

Thanks for the input.

Yeah. You can play one note in so many different places. But I think you could focus on one area of the fretboard at the time (for example frets 0-4) and then after you can read music using that area, move on to the next area (for example frets 5-9). Though I don't think it's absolutely necessary to be able to read notation that well on guitar. At least not to sight read (though I think it's still a good skill).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#27
honestly i didn't read the thread, my apologies, its 4am now lol.

but you did pretty good to start. HSS on the strat was a good call (IMO).

hopefully it will be something you can do together for a long time. i wish my dad would play. i have asked him a ton of times offered to buy him one to borrow or borrow one of mine. i wish he had interest and he doesn't.

we both really like blues and go to a lot of bars and festivals and he loves blues too and that is about 60% of what i play and i play a little slide, thought i could get him on that. didn't work either. i am done asking him now... lol. but at least we share a love of blues.

i do however have to give both him and my mother for being supportive of my playing, and take an interesting of my playing, and come over and listen to me.

have fun. good luck. very excited for you guys.
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youre just being a jerk man.



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#28
Quote by Spambot_2
don't put it near a window

I never play near windows. For teh toanz.

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitars.

My dad shows little interest in my playing guitar. Shit, I don't think he has heard me play for about 8 years.

Of course he did buy me my first real guitar (1981 Ibanez DT400). My mom really likes that I play, but she doesn't buy me a guitar because she isn't as cool as my dad.

My cousin had a bass that she never learned to play, now a friend of mine has it.

That's cool that you guys are learning together.
Last edited by DeathByDestroyr at Nov 25, 2013,
#29
A tip that would save a lot of time... I really wish I pounded on the scales, they are EVERYTHING man..... if you plan on playing awesome freestyle riffs def get the scales down. Also I want to say that I wish I didn't procrastinate on bar chords. They too are very important. Ive been on UG for a while now but when I was a beginner if I saw a B or some chord I haven't seen like a C#sus7, I would get discouraged and pick a new song. DON'T DO THAT! I've done that and I stayed at the same guitar level for a year! Definitely learn the basics and so forth. Good luck mate!

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-Some small practice amp :P
#30
Quote by Coldmaroontrain
A tip that would save a lot of time... I really wish I pounded on the scales, they are EVERYTHING man..... if you plan on playing awesome freestyle riffs def get the scales down. Also I want to say that I wish I didn't procrastinate on bar chords. They too are very important. Ive been on UG for a while now but when I was a beginner if I saw a B or some chord I haven't seen like a C#sus7, I would get discouraged and pick a new song. DON'T DO THAT! I've done that and I stayed at the same guitar level for a year! Definitely learn the basics and so forth. Good luck mate!

Gear
-Epiphone riviera
-Alverez FD60s
-Esp Ltd viper 40
-Fender Gdec 30
-Some small practice amp :P

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Answer: Yes

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#31
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
The point is to do what you are comfortable with and have fun doing. Everyone's advice on what to focus on for starting out is going to be different. There is no wrong way or right way.



Thanks.


My old arse is gonna have lots of fun with this.
2014 Gibson SG Special
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MXR M75
#32
The problem with tabs is that they don't show timing. The best way is when they show both traditional staves with the tabs lined up underneath. That way you get everything you need.
Gilchrist custom
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#33
Quote by Cathbard
The problem with tabs is that they don't show timing. The best way is when they show both traditional staves with the tabs lined up underneath. That way you get everything you need.


Guitar pro does.
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#34
Quote by ragingkitty
Guitar pro does.

Good point - and the advent of tablet computers means you could even run it on your music stand. Moving tabs are pretty cool. Paper music is just so passé.
I don't use a music stand on stage though. It's my job to learn the songs imo. but for working songs out, tabs rock. Well, they do after you weed your way through all the wrong ones.
I'm tempted to launch into a Pythonesque rant about how much easier things are now.

"We used to live in a hole in ground", etc.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#35
Quote by Coldmaroontrain
A tip that would save a lot of time... I really wish I pounded on the scales, they are EVERYTHING man..... if you plan on playing awesome freestyle riffs def get the scales down. Also I want to say that I wish I didn't procrastinate on bar chords. They too are very important. Ive been on UG for a while now but when I was a beginner if I saw a B or some chord I haven't seen like a C#sus7, I would get discouraged and pick a new song. DON'T DO THAT! I've done that and I stayed at the same guitar level for a year! Definitely learn the basics and so forth. Good luck mate!

Gear
-Epiphone riviera
-Alverez FD60s
-Esp Ltd viper 40
-Fender Gdec 30
-Some small practice amp :P

Are you related to Toppscore?

And scales aren't everything. You don't really need to know scales, unless you start improvising, writing music or get into music theory (and really, for writing music they aren't necessary but may make it easier because finding the notes you are looking for gets easier).

I wouldn't start learning scales before you start getting into improvising. Playing them up and down all the time can be really boring and if you don't even know where to use those scales, I don't see a point in learning them. Of course if you like practicing scales, fine. But don't practice scales just because "everybody does it". Knowing scales isn't needed to play your favorite songs.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#36
Without my scales I would never be able to ad-lib or actually jam out with other musicians.... Just saying. I thought the same thing as you though but when I learned my scales I had so much fun playing lead guitar. You are right though, it's good for mostly improv.

Gear
-Epiphone riviera
-Alverez FD60s
-Esp Ltd viper 40
-Fender Gdec 30
-Some small practice amp :P
#37
Quote by Coldmaroontrain
Without my scales I would never be able to ad-lib or actually jam out with other musicians.... Just saying. I thought the same thing as you though but when I learned my scales I had so much fun playing lead guitar. You are right though, it's good for mostly improv.

Gear
-Epiphone riviera
-Alverez FD60s
-Esp Ltd viper 40
-Fender Gdec 30
-Some small practice amp :P


You sound like someone who just learned what a scale was 3 weeks ago.
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(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#38
Well Haha.... I'm just trying to help man. I wish I was able to improv earlier in my playing. That's all I'm saying dude. Oh and btw I learned my scales 27 days ago so hah!

Gear
-Epiphone riviera
-Alverez FD60s
-Esp Ltd viper 40
-Fender Gdec 30
-Some small practice amp :P
#39
Don't get me wrong, scales are good, but a basic mechanical proficiency and a decent knowledge of songs are necessary before you can apply them with any real use. It's like trying to run before you can walk, or driving in the 24 Hours of Le Mans the first time you're behind the wheel.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#40
Quote by Coldmaroontrain
Well Haha.... I'm just trying to help man. I wish I was able to improv earlier in my playing. That's all I'm saying dude. Oh and btw I learned my scales 27 days ago so hah!

Gear
-Epiphone riviera
-Alverez FD60s
-Esp Ltd viper 40
-Fender Gdec 30
-Some small practice amp :P

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