#1
Hi, i usually practise guitar sitting on a chair in a classical position holding my guitar on the left leg and keep my left foot on a stool as i found this position relatively easier to play. Of late, i have been noticing that i experience wrist pain and pain in the elbow when i practise for longer time, but i usually make it a point not to practise once i experience pain. Many lessons also suggest keeping your thumb behind the neck however while doing that i am forced to keep my wrist somewhat bent which i guess sometimes causes pain . Since i am new at playing guitar i keep constantly looking at the fretboard which hurts my neck n back as well. Can someone suggest me some tips on how to maintain good posture so that i don't experience pain and injury while playing guitar and remain tension free while practising. I just cannot forgive myself if i injure myself real bad and not being able to play guitar at all.
Cheers!
#2
You're not alone.

Classical position works for electric guitar as well as acoustic. There's a reason for the 45 degree angle rather than horizontal. Additionally, it gives you a better angle for looking at the fretboard (though you're going to want to practice finding your notes withOUT looking at the fretboard -- you'll be surprised at how quickly you can do this). Hunched over is never good for your neck/back.



Thumb on the middle of the back of the guitar is considered the optimum starting position for playing guitar as well. You should return to this position when you've completed something complicated as well. If you find yourself with your palm pad just below your fingers supporting the neck of the guitar, you'll eventually have issues when you really start moving around the neck, and if you have to put the pad of your palm under your thumb on the back of the neck in order to get forearm muscles to help you do bends and vibrato, your hand hasn't been strengthened enough. It's sort of a cheat that a LOT of self-taught guitar players get into, especially those with smaller/weaker hands. Same people will always gravitate toward thicker necks, because they're always using the leverage of their palms on the neck to bend or produce vibratos.

#3
Quote by dspellman
You're not alone.

Classical position works for electric guitar as well as acoustic. There's a reason for the 45 degree angle rather than horizontal. Additionally, it gives you a better angle for looking at the fretboard (though you're going to want to practice finding your notes withOUT looking at the fretboard -- you'll be surprised at how quickly you can do this). Hunched over is never good for your neck/back.



Thumb on the middle of the back of the guitar is considered the optimum starting position for playing guitar as well. You should return to this position when you've completed something complicated as well. If you find yourself with your palm pad just below your fingers supporting the neck of the guitar, you'll eventually have issues when you really start moving around the neck, and if you have to put the pad of your palm under your thumb on the back of the neck in order to get forearm muscles to help you do bends and vibrato, your hand hasn't been strengthened enough. It's sort of a cheat that a LOT of self-taught guitar players get into, especially those with smaller/weaker hands. Same people will always gravitate toward thicker necks, because they're always using the leverage of their palms on the neck to bend or produce vibratos.


Thanks for the tips but how to maintain your wrist in a straight line while playing either chords or single notes? because in my case i somehow end up bending my wrist a lot while keeping my thumb firmly behind the neck.
#4
Quote by dspellman




what the **** is going on with that guy's sideburns?



Quote by dspellman
If you find yourself with your palm pad just below your fingers supporting the neck of the guitar, you'll eventually have issues when you really start moving around the neck, and if you have to put the pad of your palm under your thumb on the back of the neck in order to get forearm muscles to help you do bends and vibrato, your hand hasn't been strengthened enough. It's sort of a cheat that a LOT of self-taught guitar players get into, especially those with smaller/weaker hands.


It's not a cheat (assuming you're talking about electric guitar). Virtually every half-decent or better electric lead guitar player puts his/her thumb around the neck for bends and vibrato. Including pros.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Nov 24, 2013,
#5
If you are playing electric guitar, have you tried paying standing up - with the strap set fairly high so your guitar is in a similar position to how it is sat down?

Standing up isn't 'better' than sitting but you may find you are less tense when playing when you have the freedom to move a little.
#6
Quote by StuartBahn
If you are playing electric guitar, have you tried paying standing up - with the strap set fairly high so your guitar is in a similar position to how it is sat down?

Standing up isn't 'better' than sitting but you may find you are less tense when playing when you have the freedom to move a little.

ya i have to try doing that but jus feels like i am doing something wrong with my left hand position. Just unable to keep it straight in line with the forearm. May be i should wear my guitar real high.
#7
Quote by Dave_Mc
what the **** is going on with that guy's sideburns?


oh i've been there. Once when i screwed up the shape of my sideburns i ended up shaving my entire head!
#8
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?