#1
I know it is a silly question. But I wanna know whats the difference. I read somewhere that Playing more than one note at the same time is called harmony and Harmonies with three or more notes are called chords. Is it right ???
Last edited by 22990atinesh at Apr 2, 2014,
#2
I think the basis of harmony IS chords, but harmony in and of itself is not always a chord.

For example if I was harmonising a melody by 3rds, I am aware that I am "travelling" across a more than likely diatonic mindset, and suggesting the chord, without playing the chord, or even without the listener being aware that it's a chord...but it's definitely chosen because of chord harmony.

But a chord has to have at least 3 notes, and usually based off a triad (not always...for sticklers).

Harmony can have as little as 2 voices.

D F# A can be a chord

D and F# together is a harmony which may suggest a full D chord in terms of why it works.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Nov 24, 2013,
#3
^What he said.

Melody is notes played one after another.

Harmony is notes played simultaneously.

Melody is often described as horizontal because a melody will be horizontal across the page when written in sheet music while harmony is often described as vertical because the notes when written appear vertically on the page.

Chords are at least three notes being played simultaneously (harmonically).

Some sets of three or more notes were used so often they were named and we came to recognize those sets of notes by the name we gave the chord even when they were played one after the other instead of simultaneously. We call this a broken chord, or arpeggio (when the notes of a chord are played one after the other instead of playing them all at the same time).

Technically though a chord is a set of three different notes being played as the same time. Harmony is more than one note being played at the same time. Thus chords are a subset of harmony but not all harmony forms chords.
Si
#4
20Tigers, bottom line is that playing more than one note at the same time is called harmony. And when we play three or more notes at the same time then that harmony becomes chords right.
#5
Quote by 22990atinesh
20Tigers, bottom line is that playing more than one note at the same time is called harmony. And when we play three or more notes at the same time then that harmony becomes chords right.


Not really. It's really a matter of function. If the progression has a guitar playing a G major chord, and I have a 3 note harmony as part of a melody superimposed over the G, the purpose is not chords. We have the G as the chord. It's harmony.

Sometimes melodies are playing very fast. 16th notes or faster. Would you suggest that 3 part harmony is equivalent to as playing chords and changing them faster than the ear can tell? No, because it's supporting a melody, not a fast change chord progression.

Best,

Sean
#6
Quote by 22990atinesh
20Tigers, bottom line is that playing more than one note at the same time is called harmony. And when we play three or more notes at the same time then that harmony becomes chords right.

Yes. It is still called harmony but when you have three or more notes playing at once you are playing chords. Chords are harmony.

Sometimes the word harmony is used to describe the music that supports the melody and is considered distinct from the melody. An example is found in Sean's post above.

But what you have written there is correct by definition.
Si