#1
I really love Guthrie Govan's phrasing. I also love CHON, Plini, etc. I'd really love to be able to play like this. I'm going to learn some of their stuff, but I'd like to know some theory behind it so I know how the non chord tones and everything works. I'm assuming their playing is heavily influenced by jazz/fusion... anyone know anything about their influences? I'm really just looking for some good guitar stuff to get me there.
#2
Guthrie is literally influenced by everything. He played rock n roll as a kid (pre-army Elvis), then learned beatles and hendrix stuff and then studied jazz guys like Joe Pass. The reason he has such good phrasing and note choices is that hes got a monster ear. He would learn as much as he could by ear and then years later go and find the theoretical term for what he was doing.

Learning to play fusion and jazz i suggest this approach aswell. It's nice knowing what you are doing, theoretically. But knowing the sound is far more important. You must get the sound of fusion and jazz into your head to the point were you can recall it like the melody to "happy birthday".

I would suggest singing everything you play, since it helps you bridge the gap between your mind and your fingers. Then i would just suggest to study a lot of jazz and fusion music. There are tons of great guitar players in jazz and fusion, and you are not even limited to learning guitar music, there are tons of jazz and fusion without guitar aswell.

Start picking out some tunes by ear. I don't know how far into the style you are so i am going to give you some suggestions on artists.

Fusion: Guthrie Govan, Alex Hutchings, Al Di Meola, Adam Nitti, David Hines, Alain Caron, Alex Machacek, Allen Hinds, The Aristocrats, Bill Connors, Brett Garsed, Chad Wackerman, Frank Gambale, Gary Husband, Greg Howe, Scott Henderson, Vital Tech Tones, Hiram Bullock, Jeff Lorber, John Scofield, Larry Carlton, Marc Guillermont, Mike Stern, Ray Riendeau, Shawn Lane, Steve Khan, Tribal Tech, Wayne Krantz, Allan Holdsworth.

Jazz: Andreas Öberg, Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery, Jody Fisher, Pat Martino, Pat Metheny, Lenny Breau, Bill Evans, Charlie Parker, Joe Henderson, Jim Hall, Russell Malone, Dave Brubeck, Chick Corea, Dexter Gordon.

I hope that was to any help.
Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
Extremely helpful. This has been incredible. Still coming back to it. Thank you!
#4
No worries!

If you'd like i could make a more comprehensive list of musicians to check out from all different aspects of the jazz aswell as fusion scene and send your away, along with some additional advice on how to develop towards/in that style of playing.

If you're interested, just send me a PM and i'll get to writing it as soon as i can.

Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#5
Guthrie has also written two books on Guitar Playing, that you might want to pick up. Also, an exposure to learning jazz, helps when approaching fusion.

Sickz has a great list there. I'd add a few others: John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and one of my favorites, Kenny Burrell.

Best,

Sean
#6
Fusion is rooted very firmly in jazz. You can kinda play around the edges just by imitating fusion players, but if you really want that sound, you gotta dig into classic jazz.

Start easy with stuff like Louis Armstrong and good old Real Book standards. Any of the jazz players mentioned above are typical of the style, so try to soak up some of what they do, too. Use your ears, even if it takes half a hour to figure out a single note (yes, that will happen).

And definitely don't be guitar-centered. Players like Chick Corea, John Coltrane, or Miles Davis have so much to offer. You could spend months on a single song and still have more to learn.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 14, 2014,