#1
Hi, i have been diagonised with Cubital tunnel Syndrome in my fretting hand and i guess it is because of sharp bending of the wrist while playing. I hold my electric and acoustic in a classical position and i wanted some tips as to how do classical guitarists and Jazz guitarists like Joe Pass manage to keep their left hand wrist straight while playing chords or lead and at the same time keeping their thumb behind the neck most of the time. If any has been suffering from the same condition, please let me know what you did to overcome this injury and start playing again.
Cheers!
#2
Part of this issue can result simply because different people have differently shaped tendon passages in their bones. There isn't much to be done about this, save for cursing your misfortune.

In any case, we would just tell you to see a doctor, which it appears you've already done.

Regardless, a post from a person remotely located from you via the web, would be of dubious value.

I'd suggest consulting a guitar instructor, face to face, and consult with your doctor again, for any options available in the way of physical therapy.

That said, I'm not exactly certain what you mean by, "cubital tunnel syndrome". Most often this type of thing is referred to as, "carpal tunnel syndrome", (there are carpal and metacarpal bones in the hands, but I've never heard of cubital bones).

However, more info isn't going to enable me to give you any more advice than I already have. Sorry.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 25, 2013,
#3
Quote by Captaincranky
Part of this issue can result simply because different people have differently shaped tendon passages in their bones. There isn't much to be done about this, save for cursing your misfortune.

In any case, we would just tell you to see a doctor, which it appears you've already done.

Regardless, a post from a person remotely located from you via the web, would be of dubious value.

I'd suggest consulting a guitar instructor, face to face, and consult with your doctor again, for any options available in the way of physical therapy.

That said, I'm not exactly certain what you mean by, "cubital tunnel syndrome". Most often this type of thing is referred to as, "carpal tunnel syndrome", (there are carpal and metacarpal bones in the hands, but I've never heard of cubital bones).

However, more info isn't going to enable me to give you any more advice than I already have. Sorry.

Cubital and Carpal tunnel syndrome are different, it is just that Cubital tunnel syndrome isn't that as well known as Carpal tunnel.
#4
Quote by sundar334
Cubital and Carpal tunnel syndrome are different, it is just that Cubital tunnel syndrome isn't that as well known as Carpal tunnel.
So, I suppose I'm going to have to guess what it is? All righty then

Once upon a time, a "cubit", was the length of the king's forearm, from elbow to the front of his closed fist. Oddly, coincidentally, or possibly on purpose, this dimension was roughly 16", the same OC distance that modern building studs are spaced. Am I getting warmer?