#1
Hello people of the internet,

I am uppgrading from an vypyr to an axe fx. Now, I somehow know that it will blow out my noob amp in terms of everything.

What I wanted to know is what can expect from this uppgrade? I mean, yeah it will sound better ofc. But what are the advantages put to words? I have never tried any amp that is better than my vypyr, only shitty school amps that are half broken. I never tried super tube amps, pods or stuff like that.

My question sounds vague, I know, but put to words, why and how is an high end amp better than a cheap one like mine?
#2
Everything about it is better quality.
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#3
They are sort of different things, since you wanna compare an integrated amp with a pre.

In general anyway, it will sound better.
Last time I went to the local music store I tried a Rockerverb MkII and a Victory The Duke right after it.
I was with a couple buds, and all of us were blown away by how the latter's cleans sounded better.
How? Well, better.
In technical terms, it was a bit bassier, a bit more dynamic, and with a lot more color.
In generic terms, the Rockerverb's cleans sucked ass through 12" bricks compared to The Duke's.

An Axe FX is also a lot more versatile since it's all digital, so you can get a whole bloody lot of sounds out of it, and apply a whole bloody lot of funny effects to them.
It's more convenient since it's small, you can use the power amp you prefer, you can run it straight into a PA or monitors or whatever...

The Axe in particular has a bit of an unnatural sound if you ask me, the kemper is better for tube sounding stuff, but the axe has that djent factor that's hard to overlook...

If you have an expensive ass amp you can tell your friends you have cool gear, you'll actually have cool gear, you'll be able to more or less effectively copy your favorite guitarists' tones, and a lot of other nice stuff.

Big tube amps usually sound clearer, fuller and a lot of other nice things like being cooler, but everything has it's perks.
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#4
Didn't you ask this exact same question a few days ago?
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#5
Quote by pjuckazz
What I wanted to know is what can expect from this uppgrade?


You know those awesome guitar tones that you hear on youtube but can't get on the Vypyr? Yeah the AxeFX can do those.

But higher end amps just do everything better. They sit better in a mix, they're more responsive to the way you play guitar, they're more versatile, they don't have that horrendous high end fizz that most cheap solid state amps have, they don't crap out at higher volumes and so on and so forth.

That said... The AxeFX can sound absolutely terrible if you don't know how to use it. It's not something I would have suggested to someone who doesn't have a good deal of experience with real tube amps and cabs.
#6
Quote by mmolteratx
Didn't you ask this exact same question a few days ago?


Two weeks ago, to be exact!
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#7
Congrats on getting an AxeFX. I'm sure it will be killer. They cost what they do for a reason.

That said, the term 'Better' is highly subjective. The AxeFx is arguably more complex to operate and possibly one of the more complicated amp simulators out there. The AxeFx is a tweakers wet dream. It is not as plug and play as the Vypyrs. The AxeFx will also require a power amplifier unless you are only planning on using headphones or a connecting directly to a PA.

I'm not sure which Vypyr you have now. If it is the 15w then be prepared to be blown away. If it is a Vypyr 60/120 then I would say there are actually some advantages to that platform. So much so that I personally would rather have my Vypyr 60.


Also - The Vypyr 60 may surprise you as it relates to quality.


This was AcousticMirror's comments on my gut shots.


Quote by AcousticMirror

heh love the tube circuit board for the peavey vypyr.

it's 50 percent stuff that's better then whats in most boutique gear and 50 percent stuff that most builders advertise as the hot shit.


...
ya if you start from the top down on this

small resistors are probably xicons
yellow tube caps are mallories which is what stateside builders use when they aren't using sozo or orange drops
big pink resistor is either a koa or a panasonic. Koa is more likely.
all the big electro caps are panasonic or IC or nichicon
there are snubber bypasses on all the major power supply nodes.
there's a bunch of small capacitors that are standard on the higher end japanese maxon pedals.
It's all USA or Japan for the most part.

that's a lot better then say like the recent dr z stuff which has been using a ton of samwha and lelon and other korean and chinese shit.



regarding my gut shots....here is 1.



Yep. I went there.
Last edited by 311ZOSOVHJH at Nov 26, 2013,
#8
Maybe you should hold off on an Axe, stopgap with a POD HD Pro X for now.

I don't mean to insult or offend, but the Axe is a very serious piece of gear that you may not be ready to jump into if you're asking this kind of question.

I could be wrong.
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Last edited by Offworld92 at Nov 26, 2013,
#10
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
Congrats on getting an AxeFX. I'm sure it will be killer. They cost what they do for a reason.

That said, the term 'Better' is highly subjective. The AxeFx is arguably more complex to operate and possibly one of the more complicated amp simulators out there. The AxeFx is a tweakers wet dream. It is not as plug and play as the Vypyrs. The AxeFx will also require a power amplifier unless you are only planning on using headphones or a connecting directly to a PA.

I'm not sure which Vypyr you have now. If it is the 15w then be prepared to be blown away. If it is a Vypyr 60/120 then I would say there are actually some advantages to that platform. So much so that I personally would rather have my Vypyr 60.


Also - The Vypyr 60 may surprise you as it relates to quality.



It will be fun to tweak around and have unlimited tones that everybody swears sound like the real thing. I have the 75 W actually, got i some years ago. Not the tube version
#11
Quote by Offworld92
Maybe you should hold off on an Axe, stopgap with a POD HD Pro X for now.

I don't mean to insult or offend, but the Axe is a very serious piece of gear that you may not be ready to jump into if you're asking this kind of question.

I could be wrong.


Nah man I get you, but lets put it this way, money is not a problem. I am sure the Axe will last me at least 6 years, or until they get out a version 3 I guess

I am aware that it is a complicated piece of gear but I will enjoy the learning process I can't be bothered to buy one huge metal amp that weights loads. I will probably leave for university next year to another city and the convenience of the unit is awesome I really do expect this to last a lifetime, and since music is super fun and I will always play guitar, I think this suits me
#12
Quote by icronic
You know those awesome guitar tones that you hear on youtube but can't get on the Vypyr? Yeah the AxeFX can do those.

But higher end amps just do everything better. They sit better in a mix, they're more responsive to the way you play guitar, they're more versatile, they don't have that horrendous high end fizz that most cheap solid state amps have, they don't crap out at higher volumes and so on and so forth.

That said... The AxeFX can sound absolutely terrible if you don't know how to use it. It's not something I would have suggested to someone who doesn't have a good deal of experience with real tube amps and cabs.


Hehe thx for the answer, you are pretty much the only guy who really answered my question :P

I am really curious about how it ''feels'' and how it responds to the playing. I can say that my old amp sometimes crack and feels weird when playing high notes I do recognize that volume problem, my amp seems to sound pretty weird when I crank it up, the tone changes a lot from lower volumes...

Not a problem, I will do my research. Again, thx for the answer
#13
Quote by pjuckazz
Hehe thx for the answer, you are pretty much the only guy who really answered my question :P

I am really curious about how it ''feels'' and how it responds to the playing. I can say that my old amp sometimes crack and feels weird when playing high notes I do recognize that volume problem, my amp seems to sound pretty weird when I crank it up, the tone changes a lot from lower volumes...

Not a problem, I will do my research. Again, thx for the answer


Feel is a tough thing to describe. To me it's basically how the amp responds to how hard you play. Does it get cleaner as you play softer and dirtier when you really hit it? It's also got to do with the attack and decay of your notes. Most tube amps have this "bloom" effect when you hit a note which will gradually change as the note decays, while many cheaper don't have that. The sound just stays the same as the note sustains. Those kinds of things drastically alter the way it actually feels to play the guitar.

Keep in mind that these effects apply less to high gain metal amps than they do to amps like old school Marshals and Fenders.

Another thing is that the AxeFX doesn't really feel like a cranked amp at low volume. Just like a real tube amp, you really do need to crank it.

the tone changes a lot from lower volumes...


Totally normal, and it happens with all amps. It's call the Fletcher Munson Curve. It's got to do with how our ears perceive different sound frequencies at different volumes. At lower volumes we hear more midrange than we do bass and treble. Which is why most of us like practicing at home with the bass up and the mids scooped. But as the volume gets louder we hear less midrange and more bass and treble.

Which brings me to this... If you plan to use your AxeFX with a band, make your patches at rehearsal with your band at the volume your band plays at. If you dial them in at home at bedroom volume it's going to sound like absolute trash in a band setting.
#14
Quote by icronic
Feel is a tough thing to describe. To me it's basically how the amp responds to how hard you play. Does it get cleaner as you play softer and dirtier when you really hit it? It's also got to do with the attack and decay of your notes. Most tube amps have this "bloom" effect when you hit a note which will gradually change as the note decays, while many cheaper don't have that. The sound just stays the same as the note sustains. Those kinds of things drastically alter the way it actually feels to play the guitar.

Keep in mind that these effects apply less to high gain metal amps than they do to amps like old school Marshals and Fenders.

Another thing is that the AxeFX doesn't really feel like a cranked amp at low volume. Just like a real tube amp, you really do need to crank it.


Totally normal, and it happens with all amps. It's call the Fletcher Munson Curve. It's got to do with how our ears perceive different sound frequencies at different volumes. At lower volumes we hear more midrange than we do bass and treble. Which is why most of us like practicing at home with the bass up and the mids scooped. But as the volume gets louder we hear less midrange and more bass and treble.

Which brings me to this... If you plan to use your AxeFX with a band, make your patches at rehearsal with your band at the volume your band plays at. If you dial them in at home at bedroom volume it's going to sound like absolute trash in a band setting.


Thanks, greatly appriciated the AXE is on its way, waiting for it any moment to show up at my doorstep
#15
How will you be monitoring it? Particularly in a band setting.
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#16
Quote by pjuckazz
Nah man I get you, but lets put it this way, money is not a problem. I am sure the Axe will last me at least 6 years, or until they get out a version 3 I guess

I am aware that it is a complicated piece of gear but I will enjoy the learning process I can't be bothered to buy one huge metal amp that weights loads. I will probably leave for university next year to another city and the convenience of the unit is awesome I really do expect this to last a lifetime, and since music is super fun and I will always play guitar, I think this suits me


dude do you really want to bring $2000 unit to a dorm? not the best plan I've heard. sorry but I don't think you really have thought this out. on paper what you say sounds good but as mentioned it is a very complex device. as mentioned it's not a plug and play device and I know just from using my POD for recording that it takes a fair amount of time to dial in the sounds I want. the POD ide already mentioned seems like a better plan for now and then down the road a bit go that route. can't say enough about the joys of using a real amp either.