#1
I was trying to replace the strings on my acoustic guitar and I think the strings I was putting on were too heavy. They were 13 medium. I don't know much about replacing strings on an acoustic guitar, this is my first time. I didn't really know what strings to get. I kept trying to put in the strings but the pegs kept popping out. I am going to buy regular size strings soon. It looks like the peg holes got a bit bigger near the bridge. Do you think the guitar is still fine and safe to use? Do you think the pegs will pop out when I play?







Last edited by EADGBE1 at Nov 26, 2013,
#3
Please refer to this thread. We explained this a day or so ago: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1624580

And using medium string on any acoustic, is not for the faint of heart.

Keep in mind that bronze has always been harder than rosewood, hence the grooves in your bridge.

Historically, you could try researching, "The Bronze Age". It's when the human race discovered and began using metallic tools and weapons.
#4
I think Captaincranky is suggesting that the strings wore grooves in the peg holes of your bridge. FWIW, my Taylors all have the same thing from the factory. It's the way they were made.

When you replace the strings on an acoustic, it's important that the ball end of the string is snugged up against the underside of the bridge. If not, the pins will pop up as the strings are tightened. If the ball ends are properly seated against the bottom of the bridge, the pins will not pop. The proper technique is to insert the ball end of the string into the hole, then insert the peg slightly into the hole and gently pull on the string. You should feel the ball end of the string bottom out on the bottom of the bridge. Finish pressing the peg into the bridge - it doesn't need to be pressed super tight into the hole.
#5
Actually, it looks like the reamer for the pin holes was just stopped, and then withdrawn. You can see a square pattern in each of the pin holes. But yes, there normally is a guide groove at the front of the pin holes, to align the strings equidistant from each other and at the same time, to prevent sideways motion. (Although, both conditions are predicated on each other).

Other than that, we did cover this very same topic a couple of days ago, and I linked to that thread.

I'll repeat that, because I like to hear myself type the same instructions over and over.

"Bend a J hook on the ball end of each string, and make sure that each ball is placed under the front part of the bridge, inside the guitar".

Moving on, it does look like the bridge was mass produced with dull tools. I'm not seeing "pilot error", causing the conditions present.

EDIT: The square marking on the bridge hole surround, could have also been made, (for God knows what reason), by forcing a Phillips head screwdriver into the hole. That's just speculation, no harm intended.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 27, 2013,
#6


Quote by Captaincranky
Actually, it looks like the reamer for the pin holes was just stopped, and then withdrawn. You can see a square pattern in each of the pin holes. But yes, there normally is a guide groove at the front of the pin holes, to align the strings equidistant from each other and at the same time, to prevent sideways motion. (Although, both conditions are predicated on each other).

Other than that, we did cover this very same topic a couple of days ago, and I linked to that thread.

I'll repeat that, because I like to hear myself type the same instructions over and over.

"Bend a J hook on the ball end of each string, and make sure that each ball is placed under the front part of the bridge, inside the guitar".

Moving on, it does look like the bridge was mass produced with dull tools. I'm not seeing "pilot error", causing the conditions present.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
You might have some buzzing from what you've done. If that is the case you can fix that with wood fill, just be careful not to make things worse. As for string gauge, if it's a classical guitar, you want to use nothing but nylon strings, if it isn't, you can use bronze, but be careful to only use gauges made specifically for acoustics, they're sold in a separate section from electric guitar strings in most stores.
#9
Quote by JelloCrust
You might have some buzzing from what you've done. If that is the case you can fix that with wood fill, just be careful not to make things worse. As for string gauge, if it's a classical guitar, you want to use nothing but nylon strings, if it isn't, you can use bronze, but be careful to only use gauges made specifically for acoustics, they're sold in a separate section from electric guitar strings in most stores.
Mr. Crust, the great majority of classical guitars have "tie string bridges". Steel string guitars are more apt to have the push pin retainers, as pictured in the 1st post of this thread.

With that in mind, I'm basing my observations on the fact that a set of "Medium Acoustic Strings", (of the steel variety), place about 185 ponds of tension on the neck. A set of "acoustic "Lights", drops that to about 165 Lbs.

"Discretion being the better part of valor", or bad advice, I'm going to pretend that's a steel string guitar, until I am informed otherwise.