#1
hello,
I have a question
where do I start from if I want to learn scales and chords. There are so many that I don't know where to start from.
Thanks
#2
Start with the basic open chords, such as A, Am, A7, Am7, E, Em, E7, Em7, C, C7, Cadd9, D, Dm, D7, Dm7, G and G7 for starters. The reason they're called open chords, is because you don't fret all the strings.

For scales, start with the pentatonic minor, pentatonic major and major scales. From there, you can learn the ones you need or want to learn. The ones you learn will depend on the genres of music you play.
#3
Did you just start playing? If yes, buy a book that will explain you all this. I would guess almost any beginner guitar book would teach you this stuff.

First learn to play the basic chords and stuff. I see no point in learning any theory before you can play the guitar a bit. If you already can play the guitar, fine.

If you want to know theory, there are lots of lessons in the internet. Start with the basics. First learn the basics, then if you have questions that the lessons didn't answer (or you didn't understand something), ask us. We aren't going to waste our time to teach you theory because you clearly don't know any theory (and also, I think you will get better answers if you just check out some basic lessons in the internet).

Maybe start with the basics here: http://www.musictheory.net/lessons

Also, maybe you want to learn to play some guitar first. Because then understanding these things will be a lot easier. If you don't know anything about playing an instrument, there's no use for learning about the clefs and note names and intervals. At least learn to play something before you start learning theory.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
I already play guitar, on a level where I can play master of puppets (Metallica), nemesis (arch enemy), and fear of the dark (iron maiden) and more.
#5
OK, then you can start learning about music theory.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
I already have a question :-D
does it matter if notes are written upside down?
#8
Quote by Jayerrr
I already have a question :-D
does it matter if notes are written upside down?


You mean like classic notation? If theyre upside down, it means theyre bass notes, so if youre fingerpicking, you gotta use your thumb. (Not sure though, havent read classic notation in about 3-4 years.) Hope it helps!
"Most people work just hard enough not to get fired and get paid just enough not to quit." - George Carlin
#9
Quote by Jayerrr
I already have a question :-D
does it matter if notes are written upside down?


Notes on the 3rd (middle) line in the staff may be written with stems going in either direction, notes above it, stems down, below it stems up. When notes are grouped with beams (8th, 16th etc) they take the direction of the note furthest from the middle line.

Written music is our language whether you play metal or classical or anything in between and is worth studying in order to get a grasp on musical concepts from a visual perspective. Good resources, books and websites are out there and you might consider hiring a tutor to guide you, answer your questions, hold you accountable to meeting goals in small but steadily paced steps and to help you evaluate your priorities and progress.

Good luck
#10
Quote by P_Trik
Notes on the 3rd (middle) line in the staff may be written with stems going in either direction, notes above it, stems down, below it stems up. When notes are grouped with beams (8th, 16th etc) they take the direction of the note furthest from the middle line.


Unless there is more than one voice, bottom voice will have stems down, top will have stems up.
#11
Quote by chronic_stp
Unless there is more than one voice, bottom voice will have stems down, top will have stems up.


Now I'm picturing some old hymn book ouch.... I remember doing assignments in the Conservatory arranging piano parts for SATB, string quartets etc and haven't seen or used that stuff since.
#12
Quote by LazyHardRocker
You mean like classic notation? If theyre upside down, it means theyre bass notes, so if youre fingerpicking, you gotta use your thumb. (Not sure though, havent read classic notation in about 3-4 years.) Hope it helps!

What? That...just no.

Don't listen to this, TS.
#13
Quote by chronic_stp
Unless there is more than one voice, bottom voice will have stems down, top will have stems up.


I have plenty of examples here of piano sheet music with the top voice having stems down. It really has nothing to do with the voice, but more often than not aesthetics. And that includes gospel music, which is often time written in 4-part voice.
#14
Quote by KG6_Steven
I have plenty of examples here of piano sheet music with the top voice having stems down. It really has nothing to do with the voice, but more often than not aesthetics. And that includes gospel music, which is often time written in 4-part voice.


Stems up/down is entirely technical, and not aesthetic in the least. Literally everything about written music is about making it easy to read and interpret. Piano stemming is very different from SATB. Two-stave instruments don't need to use stem direction for voice indication because there is already a whole staff devoted to the lower voices.

Guitar music only uses mixed stemming if there is a distinct separation between the ranges. It's pretty standard in classical guitar notation.

You stem UP when...
- The note is below the middle line, and not barred to other notes
- when it's above the middle line, if it's barred with several notes below the middle
- when it's in the upper voice(s), if there are multiple voices in a single staff

And the opposite of those for stemming down.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 28, 2013,
#15
Quote by cdgraves
Stems up/down is entirely technical, and not aesthetic in the least. Literally everything about written music is about making it easy to read and interpret. Piano stemming is very different from SATB. Two-stave instruments don't need to use stem direction for voice indication because there is already a whole staff devoted to the lower voices.

Guitar music only uses mixed stemming if there is a distinct separation between the ranges. It's pretty standard in classical guitar notation.

You stem UP when...
- The note is below the middle line, and not barred to other notes
- when it's above the middle line, if it's barred with several notes below the middle
- when it's in the upper voice(s), if there are multiple voices in a single staff

And the opposite of those for stemming down.


+1. any piano sheet music where a top voice note has the stem pointing downwards indicates one of two things:

1) that the notation is poor; or
2) that the music is not separated by voices
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