#1
So I'm a relatively new guitarist and I'm in the market for a new mid-level guitar. I really like an Epiphone Les Paul that I played at my local Guitar Center. However, it's been there a while and is on clearance, it has these blue streaks in the fretboard. The fretboard is made of rosewood. Will these streaks come off with fretboard cleaner? If not, how could I clean it off?
#3
Couple of things you could do. First would be to scrape the fretboard down lightly with a razor blade.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ohl4nofZlIQ

Epis tend to come with a coating on them that makes the fretboard feel plastic-like. That should take care of any discoloration and make it play better. Or simply scrubbing with a Scotchbrite pad might do the trick. Then follow either up with a rub down with lemon oil, letting it soak in for 30 minutes or so.
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#4
You can scrape with the razorblade (there's an entire sticky on the MLP site regarding prepping an Epiphone). I'd definitely suggest *against* scrubbing with a scotchbrite pad or with anything that will go *across* the grain.

And finally, don't let any kind of oil or conditioner sit on your fretboard more than a minute or two and definitely do NOT let anything "soak in." Part of the problem with "soaking in" is that it will leech out again, usually ruining a set of strings.

Remember that with lemon oil or any other fretboard preparation, you're not "replacing vital olis" or anything like that. You're absolutely not "remoisturizing" the board. Lemon oil (and we're not talking real lemon oil like the stuff that you use for cooking, but the lemon oil polish that's really mineral oil with some cleaning additives and usually not lemon anything at all) accomplishes two things: the board will look better cosmetically, and it will help prevent moisture in liquid form from penetrating the wood. Honestly, if you never use lemon oil on an ebony or rosewood fretboard, it will not be worse off 50 years later. There are enough natural oils in those woods to preserve the wood just fine.
#5
For just general cleaning, I really like the Gibson fretboard cleaner. Better than Dunlop IMO. But there's a lot of products out there. Try them til you find something you like.
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#6
Quote by dspellman
You can scrape with the razorblade (there's an entire sticky on the MLP site regarding prepping an Epiphone). I'd definitely suggest *against* scrubbing with a scotchbrite pad or with anything that will go *across* the grain.

And finally, don't let any kind of oil or conditioner sit on your fretboard more than a minute or two and definitely do NOT let anything "soak in." Part of the problem with "soaking in" is that it will leech out again, usually ruining a set of strings.

Remember that with lemon oil or any other fretboard preparation, you're not "replacing vital olis" or anything like that. You're absolutely not "remoisturizing" the board. Lemon oil (and we're not talking real lemon oil like the stuff that you use for cooking, but the lemon oil polish that's really mineral oil with some cleaning additives and usually not lemon anything at all) accomplishes two things: the board will look better cosmetically, and it will help prevent moisture in liquid form from penetrating the wood. Honestly, if you never use lemon oil on an ebony or rosewood fretboard, it will not be worse off 50 years later. There are enough natural oils in those woods to preserve the wood just fine.



Funny, I got the razorblade and lemon oil tip from the same thread on MLP, and according to it:

http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/237794-post40.html

My preference is good old fashioned Old English lemon oil. I have been using it for years.

I apply it, let it soak in for about a half hour, wipe off the excess and repeat.
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#7
Quote by Stillhouse
Funny, I got the razorblade and lemon oil tip from the same thread on MLP, and according to it:



Yup, I told him what I thought about that, too <G>.
If you've got any doubts, find a really good tech and ask him. But I guarantee you that if the lemon oil "penetrates," it will also leech out again. Don't ask how I know...
#8
Well, I've done searches on the matter, and most sources which include many guitar builders and tech mention using lemon or linseed oil a couple of times a year for rosewood fretboard care. Using only a few drops at a time won't leave enough behind to seep or leech out before it biodegrades.
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Pearl & Ebony • Les Paul PlusTop Pro Honeyburst • AJ220VS • Squier Standard Stratocaster CAR
Marshall Class 5 Combo • Digitech HT-2 • Vox V847 • MXR M68 Uni-Vibe • Soul Food • BOSS SD-1 • Digitech RV-7