#1
Hey All!

I've been playing my Fender Squier and Taylor Big Baby a bunch as of late (on and off since '05) and am wondering the best way to learn how to play guitar beyond basic chords. In other words, I'm somewhat envious of people up at Guitar Center who can just pick up a guitar and 'jam' while in my mind all I can really think of to play is chords... not that I'm there at all to impress, I'm just wondering what some good resources would be to learn how to jam. I'm a big Pearl Jam fan so I've been trying to work on learning some of their songs lately, specifically 'Alive' ... seems like a good song to learn =) I have been spending a lot of time on pentatonic scales as well as various other fingering exercises and although I feel like I'm getting better at these, I still don't know how to turn the specifically pentatonic scales into music.

Any advice or links to good on-line resources specific to playing beyond just chords/bar chords would be greatly appreciated - You guys rock!
#2
Well you can be sure that even those people in their mind they hear a chord progression mentally and jam to it.At least those who can play something that makes sense.

What you need to do is learn some theory that ll put all the pieces together chords,arpeggios,scales etc etc etc so that you can realize that they are pieces of the same picture.Learn the caged system that is particularly visual and helps you superimpose all the things together.

So Ultimately when you are at the guitar center and even if all you can think of at that time is just two chords, instead of just strumming them you would have a myriad of other options that ll make them sound like an actual piece....cause instead of strumming lets say a simple Aminor chord you can play a long arpeggio Aminor line that starts from one end of the fretboard and ends at the very end or use some funky style syncopated rythm from a partial a minor chord along with a simple line from the a minor scale to outline it or just the simple chord but with embellisments or or or....the possibilites are endless but in order to be able to do that you need to know your freatboard quite well....cause in all those cases the information was the same....an Aminor chord but the presentation makes all the difference in the world .
Last edited by Dreamdancer11 at Nov 28, 2013,
#3
You could start by playing a chord progression, but instead of the last chord, play a little lick of a few notes (mostly tones that are in the chord you are replacing, and possibly a few more from the scale of the key you are in)

It can help to play with a bass (recorded or otherwise) or another guitar, as if you've been strumming a lot the change to a melodic phrase can sound a bit thin by itself.