#8
Figure out his chords. He likes 2-4-1-5, like central off the empyrean. He likes 6-1-5-4, like every chili peppers song, she looks to me, could have lied, then you got 6-4-1-5, like look on, and every boston song lol. Simple chord progressions, hes a pop music fan.
#9
He listened to a lot of songs with pleasing chord progressions, and absorbed them that way.
#10
Because he knows there's more to music then just harmonically pleasing transitions.

Actually of all popular guitarists, he has some pretty unconventional chord voicings and transitions at times when viewed in the context of pop music.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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Who's Andy Timmons??
#11
He knows the sound. You don't need any theory knowledge to write songs that sound good. And even if you know theory, you also need to know the sound. Music is all about sound.

I can't really write chord progressions that don't sound "pleasing". Or actually I could but I just don't do that because it doesn't sound good to me.

Actually, I think you aren't talking about chord progressions. You are talking about his playing style. All bands use the same chord progressions. You really can't be that unique by using "different" chords (especially when RHCP is mostly really basic pop chord progressions like I-V-vi-IV - nothing wrong with that though). What makes you unique is your style. There's more to music than just chords. I mean, you could play the same four chords and make it sound like a cliche pop song or make it sound really awesome.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#12
There is actually a chart somewhere that a (I think) french composer wrote down, detailing "common" chord progressions. (Basically, all the chord progressions that sound generally pleasing, I'd recommend the vii dim chord going into I major chord, sounds great).
#13
Quote by nargoth
There is actually a chart somewhere that a (I think) french composer wrote down, detailing "common" chord progressions. (Basically, all the chord progressions that sound generally pleasing, I'd recommend the vii dim chord going into I major chord, sounds great).

There's also a book somewhere that an English professor (I think) wrote detailing "common" sentence structures (It basically documents all the the sentence structures that sound generally pleasing). I'd recommend using a semicolon to join two independent clauses; it works quite well.
#14
^


I like you, TheHydra.

OT:
Because he basically uses progressions that either lend well to pushing towards the tonic or that end on the tonic.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Nov 29, 2013,
#15
pleasing chord progressions..lets see..

beatles songbook / paul simon songbook /

whats that you say mrs. robinson..pop music you say...theory??...mrs robinson..are you trying to seduce me..