#1
I quickly would like to know about poster size and resolution


In other words, if I have to print a 1.50 metre but 48cm (1490x480mm) poster, and it's saved in the pc under that size, what would the ideal resolution be?
Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise
Last edited by Krieger91 at Nov 28, 2013,
#2
Your mum
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#3
Most print documents have a resolution of 300 dpi. This is a sort of standard for print documents. So make a file of 1490 x 480mm with 300 dpi. Also set the color mode to CMYK instead of RGB. A printer uses different colors then a monitor.

Make sure all your text and images are a few cm's (like 5-6) away from the edges of the poster. You don't want to lose text or an image in case the poster get's cut to it's size.

When done: File > Save as > select Photoshop PDF as extension, and then choose the High Quality Print preset. Now it's ready to send to the printer guy
The only musical instrument is the mind of the performer, joined with the mind of the listener
#4
If you've already saved the file as that size, you can't do anything about the resolution now. Unless it's all vectors? 300 dpi is pretty standard.

edit: what sort of file is it?
Last edited by psyks at Nov 28, 2013,
#5
Right, I think it's been sorted, we never though tof doing the colour format. Using gimp though, not Photoshop. Don't knw if we can do the same thing, but I suspect we can.
Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise
#6
Most printers now prefer to be sent files RGB, as they are smaller. If it will be printed CMYK, they prefer to change modes themselves
#7
Some printers support that indeed. But you want the colors on your screen to be the same as the colors on the final print. Otherwise your designing a poster with colors that you like in RGB and they turn out to be different on the print.

RGB are three colors of light and therefore have a much wider range in the color spectrum then CMYK. So it it can happen that a color you used in RGB mode is not available in CMYK and the printer will find an alternative color. You want your poster to come out of the printer just like you designed it on your pc.
The only musical instrument is the mind of the performer, joined with the mind of the listener