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#1

The fact that metal music is no longer found exclusively in physical media removes much of that precious ‘aura’ that can accompany physical art objects. Demo tapes were exciting and mysterious objects because one had to ‘work’ to track them down. In the 1990s, I remember hearing rumours that there was a Pakistani metal band who had released a demo, something that seemed impossibly obscure and exotic at the time. I tried and failed to track down their tape, but I did track down others from faraway metal lands like the Phillipines and Peru and there was always a delightful frisson when tapes from distant lands finally arrived in the mail. Today, there isn’t much frisson to googling something and finding it. Stripped of the aura, rare and obscure metal recordings become much more mundane.


Keith Kahn-Harris, "Too Much Metal," Souciant, November 29, 2013.
#2
I never liked Harris's books on extreme metal or his preachy crap, but he makes some good points I suppose. However, it falls into the same trap that most mainstream articles on extreme metal do - you never actually get the feeling that the writer still goes to underground gigs or is involved in any kind of scene anymore. Seems like he outgrew his 'die-hard' phase a long time ago.
Quote by Ultraussie
I want to try that while playing the opening riff to "Tempting Time".

0-0-0-13-0-0-0-0-13 or something like that alalalala but It;s so heavy and off time and awesome and you could not f**k anyone to it.


Quote by Ingested
burzum IS nazi. well, varg is.
#3
That's because most writers DON'T go to underground gigs anymore. They romanticise over over the past and how about it used to be better in their day, though some of the points they make (such as this one here) so have weight to them.
#4
Harris (not the lovely metal forumite) is incredibly annoying. Pompous cunt. Using words like "indeed" and "aura." Should be hanged and gutted, shithead.

Fucking frisson too. Who is this idiot? What band did he play in?
#5
tracking is cool
How do you make a signature? Is this a signature? Sig?.... Nature?..... Sigmund Freud?...... Nature Valley?.... Sigmund Fraud?..... Frankie Valli?.... ah, $!*@ it...
#6
I don't see how that just because you can easily (sometimes) find a download link for an old/obscure demo that it makes the actual music "mundane." Sure, having a hard copy always feels special, but that's just material.

The music should be equally appreciated no matter what medium you get it though. The quality of the actual music doesn't vary. Sound quality, maybe, but not the actual quality of the music.
Who are you? The prince of darkness? Don't you have any friends?


#7
I spend a lot of time wondering whether spending all my cash on physical copies of things, especially paying over the odds for a first-pressing etc., is just rampant consumerism that I justify to myself because "it's music and music is totes super special and important maaan". Is it really any different to someone splashing £1000 on a D&G handbag because they really like handbags?
Quote by ChemicalFire
The point of underground bands is their not popular or famous most of the time. Thus there is a good chance they suck.
#8
...my neighbor's sister makes $87 hourly on the laptop. She has been fired from work for five months but last month her check was $20633 just working on the laptop for a few hours. use this link.....

WWW.FB49.COM
#9
Quote by eazy-c
I spend a lot of time wondering whether spending all my cash on physical copies of things, especially paying over the odds for a first-pressing etc., is just rampant consumerism that I justify to myself because "it's music and music is totes super special and important maaan". Is it really any different to someone splashing £1000 on a D&G handbag because they really like handbags?

I think that's only a problem if you buy albums so that you can impress people with your collection, like those people who pick up any old record just so they can say they collect vinyl.

I know people who will buy a designer bag simply because it has the logo on, even if they don't like the bag itself.
#11
Quote by technicolour
I think most serious fans of metal wouldn't be able to live without physical copies.

So, in order to be a "serious fan of Metal", one has to own physical copies? WHAT?!
#12
It's all about the prestige of owning that rare cassette tape/CD that no one else in your state probably has. ALL about dat swag.
Who are you? The prince of darkness? Don't you have any friends?


#13
Quote by eazy-c
I spend a lot of time wondering whether spending all my cash on physical copies of things, especially paying over the odds for a first-pressing etc., is just rampant consumerism that I justify to myself because "it's music and music is totes super special and important maaan". Is it really any different to someone splashing £1000 on a D&G handbag because they really like handbags?



This is the polar opposite of the line my missus gives me when she goes on a shopping massacre


To be fair, there are two ways of looking at this - pride and practicality. I personally take pride in my collection, and enjoy being able to pore over booklets, etc. However, I'm lucky enough in that I have space to store mine on a big bookshelf or what have you, and that I don't have many outgoings bar rent and petrol. So it suits me to have a collection and to enjoy it.

I know some lads who have kids on the way, and have had to sell their collections (after ripping them to a hard drive!). They couldn't give a toss about their collection now, as it's slipped way down the priority list. It's a way of making money now. Does that mean that they don't deserve to listen to their music as much? Of course not. They're just seeing the collection for what it is - a vast expanse of great memories, but one that's now taking up valuable space and cash.

However there is a third school - people who couldn't care less about the effort that goes into pressing, artwork, etc and just log on to whatever torrent site and boom they're a fan. Supporting record labels or gig promoters is almost alien to them. I don't worry too much about these people, as they'll grow out of metal soon.
Quote by Ultraussie
I want to try that while playing the opening riff to "Tempting Time".

0-0-0-13-0-0-0-0-13 or something like that alalalala but It;s so heavy and off time and awesome and you could not f**k anyone to it.


Quote by Ingested
burzum IS nazi. well, varg is.
#14
While physical copies don't always contribute to the listening experience that's not my main motive for spending copious amounts of money on records, CDs, patches and posters and tapes and band dildos. The atmosphere of the art bleeds so much more profusely when I'm able to hold it, put it on display, read the lyrics in cheesy castle font, the terrible low fi photography, the overblown art of a record sleeve.

so it's easy to say that Harris is a pompous internet Metal fan, because he is, but this is the first time where I'm nodding my head in agreement.

I still have my yellow Bathory sleeve. And it still feels the same way as day one.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#15
Quote by Kytokinesis
The music should be equally appreciated no matter what medium you get it though. The quality of the actual music doesn't vary. Sound quality, maybe, but not the actual quality of the music.


I interpret this backward:

The music should be appreciated, which means you seek the correct medium not just to purchase it on, but listen to it in.


The quality of the actual music doesn't change over media, and this is your most important point. You can play it on a Fisher-Price "my first jambox" two rooms over and it will still "sound" excellent.


But what that means is that you're not shopping by musical quality, or convenience, but that experience. The experience of the music.
#16
He's not talking about owning tapes, he's talking about hunting them.

I've pulled some serious gems out of the bargain bin; Organic Infest, Morgue, Skeletal Earth, Shitstorm, and some others. Usually though I burn myself by buying some serious crap and often the chase is better than the catch. At a dollar a piece, I can take the hit.

I've found some evil stuff hunting tapes that I would have never found online. The inverse is true as well, and its free.
Last edited by 2PtDescartes at Dec 2, 2013,
#17
Quote by 2PtDescartes
He's not talking about owning tapes, he's talking about hunting them.

I've pulled some serious gems out of the bargain bin; Organic Infest, Morgue, Skeletal Earth, Shitstorm, and some others. Usually though I burn myself by buying some serious crap and often the chase is better than the catch. At a dollar a piece, I can take the hit.

I've found some evil stuff hunting tapes that I would have never found online. The inverse is true as well, and its free.


Bargain bin at what store(s)? I've had a couple great Savers finds but the one music store in my city has a pitiful bargain bin selection. I feel like there must be some place I'm missing.
#18
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
So, in order to be a "serious fan of Metal", one has to own physical copies? WHAT?!


that is correct.

I fail to see the humour

#19
I didn't give a damn about artwork until I started buying vinyl. That useless little booklet in the plastic case suddenly becomes way cooler when it's a giant cardboard sleeve staring you in the face.

Soundwise, there's a ton of pseudoscientific bullshit about vinyl vs. digital sound, but I'll say that, having heard CDs/mp3s on high-end systems and vinyl on crappy turntables through cheap speakers, the vinyl always wins in my book.

With that said, I've gone on many a tangent on these forums about the benefits of having practically every underground release right at your fingertips via the internet. I still stand by those comments. Physical copies might be the preferred choice, but the quality of the music is still the most important thing to me and being able to download tons of high-quality music instantaneously is a great thing.
#20
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
So, in order to be a "serious fan of Metal", one has to own physical copies? WHAT?!

I'm curious to hear why the idea of serious fans owning physical copies seems lucrative to you
HESSIAN HAREM
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HESSIAN CULTURE. STAY TRUE.
#21
It's Sam.
A heathen, conceivably
but not,

I hope,
I’m not ashamed to be white
Vi doede ikke... vi har aldri levd
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind
Civilization is unnatural

It is a whim of circumstance
an unenlightened one
#22
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
So, in order to be a "serious fan of Metal", one has to own physical copies? WHAT?!


Consider the following. I record an album. I spend time finding the correct artwork to represent my music. I design the layout of both sleeves. I decide on a jewel case or a digipack, etc. Given all of this, part of the experience of the music would be everything that went into making the product, which would include all of the things mentioned. So, when you sit down with a cd player and listen to an album while reading along with the lyrics and examining the artwork, we can call this the ideal listening experience; thus a serious fan chooses the entire experience versus piecemeal approaches that listen to songs intermittently and don't even bother to look at the artwork.

Obviously this is changing because of the internet age, and it is perhaps no longer financially prudent to produce a physical medium because digital files are the norm now. I think you're better able to appreciate the aura of a work of art if you are actually handling a physical reproduction of it instead of scouring your digital library for an album.

Edit: I totally didn't read the article when I posted this, and I was referring to Walter Benjamin's concept of "aura," only to see that he is cited in the paper. I am awesome, and I have been in college way too long.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
Last edited by The Virtuoso at Dec 4, 2013,
#23
I don't think it's changing in Metal, unless you count all the djent and prog bands on bandcamp in the category, but more changing in newer types of music that pop up.
#24
The fact is, anything posted anywhere online is not rare anymore. To me it's better now than ever
#25
you might want to rethink that one Morph.

considering the following....

Timeghoul. Timeghoul released their two demos in '92 and '94 respectively, and went relatively unknown for the remainder of the time. When the internet came around, and those awful metal trolls that eveyone likes to complain about began talking about Timeghoul, and where able to share Timeghoul's music, there was enough buzz talk around to convince a label to pick it up and release the music for the first time in a format other than cassette.

Atheist and Cynic reformed in 2007 under similar circumstances - buzz in the underground about the legacy of Unquestionable Presence and Focus convinced them to reform (however, this side of the story has a less than ideal ending given the recent output of each band).

This sort of communication among the underground, coupled with blog sharing sites and youtube makes it incredibly easy for metalheads to seek out lost music. That is certainly a marked change when you consider the old days had word of mouth and limited zine distribution to get the word around.
HESSIAN HAREM
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HESSIAN CULTURE. STAY TRUE.
#26
Quote by progbass
you might want to rethink that one Morph.

considering the following....

Timeghoul. Timeghoul released their two demos in '92 and '94 respectively, and went relatively unknown for the remainder of the time. When the internet came around, and those awful metal trolls that eveyone likes to complain about began talking about Timeghoul, and where able to share Timeghoul's music, there was enough buzz talk around to convince a label to pick it up and release the music for the first time in a format other than cassette.

Atheist and Cynic reformed in 2007 under similar circumstances - buzz in the underground about the legacy of Unquestionable Presence and Focus convinced them to reform (however, this side of the story has a less than ideal ending given the recent output of each band).

This sort of communication among the underground, coupled with blog sharing sites and youtube makes it incredibly easy for metalheads to seek out lost music. That is certainly a marked change when you consider the old days had word of mouth and limited zine distribution to get the word around.


Ah, yeah, I see what you mean. I was speaking more about it not changing to a solely digital format than a physical format, though.
#27
I think both Proggy and Morph make some good points. For Morph, I would say you're probably right, but I still worry that bands might opt more for digital downloads because it is cheaper than producing a physical album, and more people might be inclined to buy these considering how many people download music these days anyway. Proggy brings up a good point too, and I think he's right that the internet has definitely helped some relatively unknown bands gain a wider audience because of the extensive ways in which the internet connects people who normally would not have been connected.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
#29
if Im paying for it I want a tangible object. Thus vinyl or cd it is. Paying for mp3 files just seems wrong to me.

Anyway, talked to Corchado anddd he's considering a vinyl print of Deathcult but sales are low and its expensive so like go buy everything goddamnit (turns out I bought the reissue on cd directly from him and had to ask )
#30
Quote by The Virtuoso
Given all of this, part of the experience of the music would be everything that went into making the product, which would include all of the things mentioned.


It's clever that you can disguise sales-speak as a proclamation on the metaphysical nature of musical works of art. But in the real world no-one over the age of eight has ever thought "Wow, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son is a great album but the artwork is the same old stuff we've come to expect from Maiden so it drags the whole listening experience down."

People who think of the artwork and the inlay as part of 'the product' are admen who want to sell to idiots by putting shiny things on the front cover. That's the reason CD's and Vinyl have covers in the first place, to market to people. So morons know that the knew A7x album is totally brutal because it has, like, skulls and stuff, which is way hardcore.

Less well known bands might not have the same train of thought, but consciously or not the cover art is still basically an advertising gimmick. It would make no difference to anyone's listening experience if everyone in the world decided tomorrow that all albums should have white covers with black text announcing the band name and album title.
.
#31
Quote by Nietsche
It's clever that you can disguise sales-speak as a proclamation on the metaphysical nature of musical works of art. But in the real world no-one over the age of eight has ever thought "Wow, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son is a great album but the artwork is the same old stuff we've come to expect from Maiden so it drags the whole listening experience down."

People who think of the artwork and the inlay as part of 'the product' are admen who want to sell to idiots by putting shiny things on the front cover. That's the reason CD's and Vinyl have covers in the first place, to market to people. So morons know that the knew A7x album is totally brutal because it has, like, skulls and stuff, which is way hardcore.

Less well known bands might not have the same train of thought, but consciously or not the cover art is still basically an advertising gimmick. It would make no difference to anyone's listening experience if everyone in the world decided tomorrow that all albums should have white covers with black text announcing the band name and album title.

#32
There are a lot of great points being raised in this thread, and here's the thing: I don't think there's any one RIGHT opinion on this. It depends on who you are, what things you value, what stage of life you're in.
For example, when I was in my early teens and I bought Dream Theater's "Awake" album, I loved the experience of having the physical disc with the cover art. The art intrigued me and added to the mystery of the music I was hearing (it was my first metal album). When I bought Cannibal Corpse's "The Bleeding", it added to the brutality to be able to read along with the music through the lyrics book. Fast forward to today. I'm married, have a son, and am working full-time. Literally the only time that I get to listen through an album these days is on my commute to work. I don't have time to sit down and read through the lyric book while listening to the CD. So now, my ideal listening experience has changed. For example, the other week, I bought Valkyrie's "Man of Two Visions" on iTunes for $7.00, transferred it to my iPhone, and listened to it on my commute for a week straight. No, I'm not getting the same experience as I used to, but neither do I have time for the same experience that I used to.

All this to say: neither side is right or wrong; there is certainly a market for physical media, but the digital media market is continuing to grow.
#33
Quote by Nietsche
It would make no difference to anyone's listening experience if everyone in the world decided tomorrow that all albums should have white covers with black text announcing the band name and album title.


A nice broad sweeping generalisation there! For some albums, the music is definitely enhanced by the artwork for me. I've never been put off an album by bad artwork, but the opposite has definitely had an effect on me.

Calling it a 'gimmick' for underground bands when maybe about 500-1000 people in the entire world are going to buy the album is a bit redundant. The artwork and layout reflects the passion and sacrifice going into creating demos/eps/lps, and that is part of metal for me.

Even if you don't have the album art with you while listening to something, you can still picture the grey skies of The Gathering Wilderness, the ancient tombs of Nekromanteion - when the artwork is perfectly chosen, it sets the mood and complements the music perfectly.
Quote by Ultraussie
I want to try that while playing the opening riff to "Tempting Time".

0-0-0-13-0-0-0-0-13 or something like that alalalala but It;s so heavy and off time and awesome and you could not f**k anyone to it.


Quote by Ingested
burzum IS nazi. well, varg is.
#34
Quote by Nietsche
It's clever that you can disguise sales-speak as a proclamation on the metaphysical nature of musical works of art. But in the real world no-one over the age of eight has ever thought "Wow, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son is a great album but the artwork is the same old stuff we've come to expect from Maiden so it drags the whole listening experience down."

People who think of the artwork and the inlay as part of 'the product' are admen who want to sell to idiots by putting shiny things on the front cover. That's the reason CD's and Vinyl have covers in the first place, to market to people. So morons know that the knew A7x album is totally brutal because it has, like, skulls and stuff, which is way hardcore.

Less well known bands might not have the same train of thought, but consciously or not the cover art is still basically an advertising gimmick. It would make no difference to anyone's listening experience if everyone in the world decided tomorrow that all albums should have white covers with black text announcing the band name and album title.



That's a nice, hasty generalization you have there. Shall we begin to enumerate the albums with artwork I am willing to bet most people will agree add to the listening experience? Of course, I am not going to appeal to the general population as my entire justification as that would be fallacious; however, I am fairly confident in claiming one of us could do a close analysis of something like Hvis Lyset Tar Oss and draw connections between the imagery presented, the lyrical content, and the musical progressions throughout the album.

Do I think that all albums have the same quality of experience? No. You're right in claiming that some bands just have salespeople use the artwork as an advertisement, but even this speaks to the experience being given by the album. I don't think you've shown anything wrong with the position that musical works of art are not just experienced as auditory wavelengths hitting your ear drums ("4:33") try again.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
#35
I'm going to have to throw in my lot with the pro album artwork people.

I've said before that good music tries to convey some sort of idea, and ideally it will be able to stand on its own in that regard. You could therefore say that album art, along with lyrics and even song titles, are superfluous, but I think a musician who has a good idea of what their music is supposed to be 'about' (i.e. they don't just randomly assemble melodies) will be able to write lyrics, choose song titles and choose artwork that support the music.

The music should be good in its own right, but good album artwork completes the whole package.
#36
Quote by The Virtuoso
however, I am fairly confident in claiming one of us could do a close analysis of something like Hvis Lyset Tar Oss and draw connections between the imagery presented, the lyrical content, and the musical progressions throughout the album.


Then do it.

The fact that the cover art might reflect the musical content of the album in however vague a sense doesn't deter from the fact that it's an advertising medium, it wouldn't be a very good advertisement if it didn't tell the customer something about what was being advertised, that doesn't mean that it affects the content of the album.

Thought experiment, if Hvis Lyset Tar Oss had fluffy bunnies and rainbows on the front cover would that change your perception of the music?

I don't think you've shown anything wrong with the position that musical works of art are not just experienced as auditory wavelengths hitting your ear drums ("4:33") try again.


I didn't say that and I have no idea what the John Cage reference is about.

Here's my deal, pictures are not music. Music is not a visual medium, ergo cover art has no relevance to the audio content. This is the kind of reasoning that a child should be able to deal with but apparently you need more help.

So try this exercise - Should Mozart should've appended pretty pictures to copies of his String Quintet's? Would that somehow elevate the musical experience for you? If so, why?

Quote by Hoodoo Man
I've said before that good music tries to convey some sort of idea


OK, what idea does this convey then?
.
Last edited by Nietsche at Dec 6, 2013,
#37
Artwork and shit is certainly a fantastic addition to the music, and the overall experience of owning that album.

That being said, kids in the Soviet Union in the '60s would clamor for 3rd or 4th generation copies of Beatles cassettes passed around in the underground because listening to the Beatles and other pop rock acts were illegal. Sound quality was shit, there was no fancy artwork or label, but it still instilled a lot of them to build their own guitars and basses just to learn to play the songs.

So really, it doesn't matter at all with respect to the actual music, fancy artwork and double-gatefolds just feel good.
Who are you? The prince of darkness? Don't you have any friends?


#38
Quote by Nietsche
Then do it.

The fact that the cover art might reflect the musical content of the album in however vague a sense doesn't deter from the fact that it's an advertising medium, it wouldn't be a very good advertisement if it didn't tell the customer something about what was being advertised, that doesn't mean that it affects the content of the album.

Thought experiment, if Hvis Lyset Tar Oss had fluffy bunnies and rainbows on the front cover would that change your perception of the music?


I didn't say that and I have no idea what the John Cage reference is about.

Here's my deal, pictures are not music. Music is not a visual medium, ergo cover art has no relevance to the audio content. This is the kind of reasoning that a child should be able to deal with but apparently you need more help.

So try this exercise - Should Mozart should've appended pretty pictures to copies of his String Quintet's? Would that somehow elevate the musical experience for you? If so, why?


OK, what idea does this convey then?


I will do it in due time. I want to do other things right now instead of sitting down with that album. Perhaps I'll do Colored Sands instead since I just bought it and I haven't sat down with the physical medium yet.

Define an advertising medium. Define musical perception. It sounds like you agree that album art reflects the content of the music, how is this different from a visual manifestation of the thematic elements of the music?

I think the thought experiment you described would change my "perception" of the music if I were to see it. It sounds like you think the only thing relevant to the album is the actual recorded sounds. Tell me then, why would anyone go see a band perform live? If music is nothing more than these recorded bits, how would a concert experience with it's lighting, effects, etc. add to the musical experience? By analogy, if the concert experience does add something that the recorded bits alone do not have, it's not a far stretch to make the same claim for album art since it is an "extraneous" element as well.

Clarify your position then, because it sounds like you think the only relevant experience is the actual sounds. I brought up 4:33 because it is a piece that brings into question what a musical experience is.

Music does not equal musical experience. I think there is a division between what music is, whatever the hell that means, and the listener's experience of music. I think you are the one who needs help learning to avoid ad hominems.

I think you're getting too caught up on the literal pictures part. Granted this was the initial topic, and this is difficult to convey over an internet forum, but I think there are others elements that add to one's musical experience other than the music itself, hence the album art. For Mozart, perhaps looking at his sheet music would make a difference, attending a performance of it, watching a video of it versus listening to a vinyl of it.

Think about the difference between @music (@=actual) versus all of mediums in which it can be presented, and think of how each one of these will affect the listening experience. I hope this makes sense. Sorry if I was a little mean in my last post, but there's no need to get angry.
Quote by Senor Kristian
Viking fact no. 1: Viking helmets did not have horn.
Viking fact no. 2: Vikings tobogganed on their shields into battle.
Viking fact no. 3: Vikings drank mead.
Viking fact no. 4: One of your ancestors are likely to have been raped by a viking.
#39
Quote by Nietsche
Here's my deal, pictures are not music. Music is not a visual medium, ergo cover art has no relevance to the audio content.

Music isn't a visual medium, but album art is, and the two can be taken together to make a multimedia piece of artwork that is an album, with both parts contributing to the overall idea.

OK, what idea does [Bach's Prelude and Fugue no.6 from the Well-tempered Clavier] convey then?

To my knowledge Bach's music was intented to represent the glory and beauty of God.

I'm not talking solely about program music. It doesn't have to be a tangible 'story' or anything like that. Some of Bach's pieces sound bright and airy, while some sound vast and majestic, and I have no doubt that Bach composed them intentionally to sound like that.

That piece in particular I'm not very familiar with, but based on listening to it now I'll grant that I'd have trouble describing it as being 'about' some straightforward concept because there are some contrasts there. The prelude has a lively mood but a dark tonality, and some chromaticism that seems to sweep in and shatter the established mood. The fugue is dark and moody, but more personal than the grand, doom laden darkness of his Passacaglia and Fugue, for example. Like I said, I'm certain that, consciously or unconsciously, Bach meant every part of that composition to work towards a common goal.

Edit: I'd like to expand on that based on a second listen. The prelude has a distinct sense of development from simple melodies to begin with that get broader before being overwhelmed by crashing chords, then the chromatic run and finally a bright resolution. I could easily impose a narrative on that, such as an adventure through various dangers that ends in success and personal harmony. The narrative may not be Bach's, but it seems reasonable to think that he intended there to be a sense of conflict or struggle leading to a resolution.
Last edited by Hoodoo Man at Dec 6, 2013,
#40
A possible plan to save metal.

1. Since CD's are not selling and bands are touring to get their music heard. Stop downloading MP3's or using programs to download music,actually buy the CD's. Because you're the most important part of getting the music noticed again,rock/metal fans we need all the help we can get.

2. Start getting others into rock/metal,by allowing others to listen to it by giving them one of the parts of your headphones.

3. Go to the concerts,if they can't tour the music doesn't get noticed.
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