#1
Im debating between getting one of the prs se guitars ( 245 or custom 24) but also am intrigued by the new j offerings by gibson. Does anyone have any insight into these guitars?
#2
those new J series Gibsons seem cheap to me. not really a fan. the PRS guitars tend to be good values for the money.
#3
yeah ive heard mixed reviews for the j series but idea wise they seem cool. I think one of the issues is that i dont know much about the wrap around bridge on the 245 and intonation on it
#4
Both are good. The finish on the Gibsons leave something to be desired, and you'll probably want to replace the nut and pickups eventually on both, though the Gibson pickups are a bit nicer IMO. The LPJs I've played have been set up prorpely but there have been some reports of poor setups on those, so look out for that. As with any Gibson you'll want to play the one you're buying. The SE 245 didn't impress me much, they sounded confused. The Custom 24 sounds like a great PRS, with that great balance of Fender and Gibson type tones. The 245 seemed like it was trying hard to sound like a LP but just couldn't quite hack it.

If this were me I'd save up a bit more and get one of the Gibson Tribute models, or an LTD EC1000 depending on what type of music it was for. The LPJ are good but the finish and pickups are not brilliant. Bumping the budget up just a bit gets you into the range of a used USA PRS, or a Gibson Tribute Series, or that EC1000, all of which I'd say are totally solid all-around, and sound very good. There are also a lot of offerings from Japan if you are looking for a traditional LP sound. Burny/Tokai/Greco etc. are all excellent quality

What amp are you using? What sound are you looking for? There's a fair bit of difference between all of those models, it would help to at least narrow that down. A C24 is going to sound a lot different than a LPJ, the quality difference likely won't be the deciding factor there.
#5
Im going for a modern guitar sound , playing through a traynor ycs(similar to marshall jcm2000) Im not looking for emgs or anything like that but i want the ability to play some metal on this guitar while still backing off well for blues and rock
#6
I fell in love with an SGJ after playing it at guitar center, but this is coming from someone who abhors PRS's
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Originally Posted by Tulkas
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#7
Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
I fell in love with an SGJ after playing it at guitar center, but this is coming from someone who abhors PRS's

At this point after playing both part of me is starting to think that buying one and financing the other isnt a bad idea(it really is a bad idea) lol but i think right now its between the 24 and the sgj but itll depend on if I can find the right sgj
#8
24, SGJ, or the EC1000 model with the Duncans instead of EMGs, lots of great choices.
#9
I vote SE Custom 24. It can do all of those things very easily.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#10
MF has SGJ's for $399 right now
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#11
Quote by tonehunter1992
yeah ive heard mixed reviews for the j series but idea wise they seem cool. I think one of the issues is that i dont know much about the wrap around bridge on the 245 and intonation on it


Speculation is that the "J" stands for Junque. These are the cheapest that Gibson could produce a guitar and honestly, if they had any other brand name on the headstock, you'd pass them by if they were sitting in the $150 Holiday Special Bin at CostCo. And my sincerest apologies to those who've purchased them and love them to death.

Gibson Marketing is becoming aware that their reliance on Baby Boomer tradition, nostalgia and money is fairly rapidly coming to an end, what with 78 million of them reaching age 65 over the next 11 years. They now realize that Korean and Chinese guitars own the under-$1000 market and that the entry level player has no allegiance to Gibson at all. The guitar market went through a bit of a bump when Rock Band and Guitar Hero repopularized classic rock for a while, but the soundtrack of today's generation features one-name female singers and a few random hip-hop artists.

Gibson has stripped these guitars of virtually everything that could be considered labor intensive; there's little or no finish, a barely sanded CNC'd chunk of wood and the cheapest possible pickups (forget what Gibson pickups sell for on the aftermarket, it costs Gibson about $1.00-$1.50 to make the LPJ pickups). What they're relying on for sales is the logo on the headstock and the guitars' visual resemblance to quality guitars of the past.

You can see the same thing going on with the Midtown series, designed to be reminiscent of the 335 (and now the Birdland with the Kalamazoo, and painted to match, but with flat tops that show the waves in the sanding, etc.

Honestly, the SE series of PRS guitars are significantly superior at the same prices (and I don't own one of those, either).
#12
Quote by Robbgnarly
MF has SGJ's for $399 right now


Bear in mind that GC is taking as much as 50% of that selling price to cover labor/rent/corporate profit/advertising/etc. and that Gibson was able to produce that guitar *and* make a profit off it at around $200 "per unit" out the door. If you think you're getting a near relative of an R9, think again <G>.

Here's what you can get for $425 from another vendor:

# Triple bound body and headstock
# Single binding on neck
# Graph Tech NVS2 bridge with string saver saddles
# Improved nickel plate hardware, including nickel die-cast Grover tuners with 18-1 turning ratio for ultra fine tuning (Model 102-18N)
# Two Type V Alnico humbucker pickups for that warm, traditional sound
# improved wiring, improved pots (now higher voltage with brass shafts for reduced noise), and an improved pickup selector switch
# Two volume controls, two tone controls, plus a three way pickup selector switch
# One piece mahogany set neck with 13.7" (350mm) radius neck for fast play and adjustable truss rod
# Ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and Mother of Pearl trapezoid inlays
# D'addario strings installed at the factory and a professionally installed Graph Tech nut
# Individually hand filed frets for professional feel and playability
#13
Quote by dspellman
Bear in mind that GC is taking as much as 50% of that selling price to cover labor/rent/corporate profit/advertising/etc. and that Gibson was able to produce that guitar *and* make a profit off it at around $200 "per unit" out the door. If you think you're getting a near relative of an R9, think again <G>.

Here's what you can get for $425 from another vendor:

# Triple bound body and headstock
# Single binding on neck
# Graph Tech NVS2 bridge with string saver saddles
# Improved nickel plate hardware, including nickel die-cast Grover tuners with 18-1 turning ratio for ultra fine tuning (Model 102-18N)
# Two Type V Alnico humbucker pickups for that warm, traditional sound
# improved wiring, improved pots (now higher voltage with brass shafts for reduced noise), and an improved pickup selector switch
# Two volume controls, two tone controls, plus a three way pickup selector switch
# One piece mahogany set neck with 13.7" (350mm) radius neck for fast play and adjustable truss rod
# Ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and Mother of Pearl trapezoid inlays
# D'addario strings installed at the factory and a professionally installed Graph Tech nut
# Individually hand filed frets for professional feel and playability

That's fine, I was posting so that TS didn't over pay for one.

Go hug your Agile
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#14
I just went through this:
I have a 1977 Les Paul Custom that I really didn't care to take out to much so I bought a 2013 Les Paul Studio...nice guitar, gold hardware etc. Seemed OK until I played a PRS SE Santana. So...I bought the Santana. I liked it so much, I bought a second Santana. Both these SE's totally blew the LP studio out of the water...absolutely no comparison. I recently traded the second Santana along with the LP Studio in on a PRS S2 Custom 24. This is the new American made PRS. In spite of some of the negative reviews on the S2 series, it's a fantastic guitar at a third the price of their Core line. So I now have the S2, the Santata SE and my old 1977 Gibson. The S2 played and sounds as good as the Gibson, so now the Gibby sets in its case and the PRS's see all the action. There is no comparison in the PRS SE line compared to the Fender Mex. strat. The SE will win hands down every time. Quality and workmanship are excellent in the import PRS's. Highly recommended.
#15
Quote by Bob Sherwood
I just went through this:
I have a 1977 Les Paul Custom that I really didn't care to take out to much so I bought a 2013 Les Paul Studio...nice guitar, gold hardware etc. Seemed OK until I played a PRS SE Santana. So...I bought the Santana. I liked it so much, I bought a second Santana. Both these SE's totally blew the LP studio out of the water...absolutely no comparison. I recently traded the second Santana along with the LP Studio in on a PRS S2 Custom 24. This is the new American made PRS. In spite of some of the negative reviews on the S2 series, it's a fantastic guitar at a third the price of their Core line. So I now have the S2, the Santata SE and my old 1977 Gibson. The S2 played and sounds as good as the Gibson, so now the Gibby sets in its case and the PRS's see all the action. There is no comparison in the PRS SE line compared to the Fender Mex. strat. The SE will win hands down every time. Quality and workmanship are excellent in the import PRS's. Highly recommended.

I have an old PRS CE22, this was the original "budget" PRS it is way better than the S2 in every way and they run $1000+ used.
I'm just not fond of the bevels on the S2 and the fact they use the SE hardware on a $1000+ new USA PRS, that is BS.

But the SE line is deff a good value when bought used
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#16
Quote by Robbgnarly
That's fine, I was posting so that TS didn't over pay for one.

Go hug your Agile


Agile(s). Plural. Three dem suckahs. Nice cheap guitars.

Got Gibsons, too. Among them a '67 335-12 string, a 67 335 six-string, a '49 ES-175, a recent Axcess Custom, three old LPs, an L5S, an L6S (originals) and maybe half a dozen other Gibbies. Altogether around 50 guitars at last count. In short, I can identify a good Gibson when I see one, and I can spot a cheap guitar when I see one.

Okay, hugging now.