#1
What model/make Carvin is being played in this video? (I also noticed it looks like pickups might have been swapped out?) No matter how hard it look I can't seem to find whatever body that Carvin has on their site. The closest I found was the DC747 and the DC700. It looks like a 7String 24 fret C66 (which doesn't exist)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ou8Eu1RwXk
Last edited by pdxhwa at Nov 30, 2013,
#2
Looks like a DC700 to me...
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#3
Quote by oneblackened
Looks like a DC700 to me...

Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the DC700 only come in H-H pickup setup?
#4
That video was pretty gay.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Nov 30, 2013,
#6
It's definitely a DC700.
You can get almost any pickup configuration you want, some might be an option 50 and cost you though.
#7
as far as i know, the option 50 just cancels your 10 day trial period. it arrives at your door, its yours.

but yeah, you have to pay for the feature/spec, just like anything else they do. i am not sure if they upcharge just because it isnt on the standard feature list.
Carvin CT624
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#8
That model is usually referred to as the DC-747. It's not an Option 50; it's a standard configuration option (http://www.carvinguitars.com/catalog/guitars/dc747 ). It's been around since 1999 and is one of the two models (the other is the DC-727) with which Carvin first entered the 7-string fray. It's just got an added single coil size pickup in the center.
#9
Quote by dspellman
That model is usually referred to as the DC-747. It's not an Option 50; it's a standard configuration option (http://www.carvinguitars.com/catalog/guitars/dc747 ). It's been around since 1999 and is one of the two models (the other is the DC-727) with which Carvin first entered the 7-string fray. It's just got an added single coil size pickup in the center.

The thing I'm confused about is that the guitar in the video looks pretty edgy (I mean it doesn't look very rounded like the 747 is), and I don't see an option for an H-S-H configuration anywhere on the custom configuration page for the DC700.
#11
The standard 747 comes with straight body sides. "Rounded body sides" (what you see in virtually every shot that Carvin puts up lately) is actually a $50 option.

If (and only if) you want the faux binding (which that guitar has), you have to order the guitar with the standard straight body sides (which that guitar has). Look at the bottom two selections on the "Body Options" page of the "builder" for the 747.

I personally think the rounded body sides look a bit blobby, and all of my Carvins have straight body sides. That was the original design, with the blob...er...rounded body sides showing up much later.
#12
Quote by dspellman
The standard 747 comes with straight body sides. "Rounded body sides" (what you see in virtually every shot that Carvin puts up lately) is actually a $50 option.

If (and only if) you want the faux binding (which that guitar has), you have to order the guitar with the standard straight body sides (which that guitar has). Look at the bottom two selections on the "Body Options" page of the "builder" for the 747.

I personally think the rounded body sides look a bit blobby, and all of my Carvins have straight body sides. That was the original design, with the blob...er...rounded body sides showing up much later.


Wow, you're right. Thanks a bunch!
#13
faux binding?

by that you mean that it is not actually binding, but a layer of unfinished wood that they leave showing, then yes.

but ask yourself, do you want plastic binding? like most BS they put on gibsons? or do you want a beautiful layer of figured wood?

and if you want a guy to hand layer on figured wood, or you just let beautiful wood from the top show through, its basically acomplishing the same thing. in fact, i think carvins meathod is probably better for structural integrity and tone (less other uneeded parts and glue)
Carvin CT624
Walden G630ce Acoustic
Carvin V3M, Avatar 2x12 WGS Reaper, vet 30
(crybaby, Fairfield circuitry Comp, GFS tuner, Vick Audio 73 Ram's Head, Xotic AC booster, lovepedal trem, TC Flashback, PGS Trinity Reverb, Walrus Audio Aetos power)
#14
I know all about the options dspellman, the problem with this assumption is that the DC727 and 747 have a thicker maple top and always have, while all the DC600, DC700, and DC800 all have a thinner veneer like the one in this video. Compare the two and I think you'll agree.
#15
Quote by mr.rs
I know all about the options dspellman, the problem with this assumption is that the DC727 and 747 have a thicker maple top and always have, while all the DC600, DC700, and DC800 all have a thinner veneer like the one in this video. Compare the two and I think you'll agree.


Don't lock yourself into assumptions regarding tops, etc.
Better yet, call Carvin and ask for what you want; chances are they'll make it.
Consider the options pages serving suggestions. I have at least three Carvins that someone will tell you can't exist. I've been dealing with them since the late '80's.

For example, I have two DC-150s (the original small-bodied ones that were discontinued in '92). The DC-150 throughout its life was a set neck guitar. The two I have are neck-through. One has a koa neck and body with a flamed maple cap (the latter done in "vintage yellow"). It has an HSH pickup configuration with a five-way, coil taps and phase switch, master volume, master tone. Not offered in any catalog or build sheet. The other is done in solid maple, all black, has a flying V-style headstock, active preamp, HH configuration, Kahler trem, Kahler flip-top behind the nut string lock, master volume, master bass, master treble, blend knob, coil taps, phase switch and maybe the lowest non-buzzing action of any guitar I own. A third ('91) guitar is a solid koa superstrat DC-145 HSH configuration (neck-through as well) but with a 22-fret 25.5" scale. Take a guess at how many of those there are out there?
#16
Quote by ikey_
faux binding?

by that you mean that it is not actually binding, but a layer of unfinished wood that they leave showing, then yes.

but ask yourself, do you want plastic binding? like most BS they put on gibsons? or do you want a beautiful layer of figured wood?

and if you want a guy to hand layer on figured wood, or you just let beautiful wood from the top show through, its basically acomplishing the same thing. in fact, i think carvins meathod is probably better for structural integrity and tone (less other uneeded parts and glue)


No argument from me, but it's still faux binding, and I don't consider that a negative thing -- it's just a paint choice. There ARE guitars that have land-laid wood binding (mostly at the higher end of things). Taylor, for example will do figured maple, koa and several other kinds of woods as binding on its guitars. PRS will do both faux and real binding.
#17
Quote by mr.rs
I know all about the options dspellman, the problem with this assumption is that the DC727 and 747 have a thicker maple top and always have, while all the DC600, DC700, and DC800 all have a thinner veneer like the one in this video. Compare the two and I think you'll agree.


*squints* How can you tell how thick/thin the top is in that video?

Presumably the top is at least as thick as the depth of the faux binding. I think Carvin may be (or may already have done) reducing the top thickness of their guitars across the board, leastways the flat ones (and this includes the 747). This allows them to "bend" the top to follow body contouring (such as the forearm contour) more easily. In the past, the forearm contour (particularly on "rounded body sides" guitars) has often revealed body wood, and Carvin had to put disclaimers in the build sheets for certain translucent finish styles so that new owners would be aware of it before proceeding. It also allows for consistent thickness of the faux binding.

It's entirely possible that the DC 700 will replace the 747 and 727 designations in the future. Carvin has changed the naming conventions before while still providing essentially the same guitars. They've also made changes to body shapes that have the SAME model designation (particularly confusing in the instance of the DC-150). They're also very easy about putting random headstock shapes on guitars that are advertised with one particular look, so that the "pointy" headstock shape you see on most DC700s can easily be transposed to DC 747s and vice-versa. Folks these days routinely have the 7-string shape adapted to their six strings, etc. That's the nice thing about Carvin -- you can often go off-road with them, and they'll bust their butts to get the guitar done for you.
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 2, 2013,