#1
My question is how do i achieve that large, full and clear sound heard on songs? You know how recordings have multiple tracks of the same guitar to fill up the sounds and really bring out the bass when chugging? Is that possible on an amp? Is it just a matter of having a head and cab? Or is it amp quality? Can i do it by plugging more speakers into my amp?
#2
best way is to either run a stereo rig (so 2 amps at the same time) or run a wet/dry rig (so you run your main amp dry with no effects and run your effects into a separate power amp/speaker)....either of these sounds HUGE. Yes it means more gear but hey we all love having lots of gear right
#3
My first thought is where is your tone stack's "mid" setting? The mids allow a guitar to cut through a mix. So many people turn them down for the classic "scooped" sound when they're playing by themselves that when you try to get something going with other instruments, it gets lost in the mush (as someone who ran a soundboard for 5 years, I'll atest to that).

If you're looking for the "chug", a closed back speaker cab that's you're running a lot of power through will help. Depending on your "domestic environment" (I live in an apartment), this is impossible due to volume.

Good pickups help. If you have a cheap guitar, that's one huge improvement that's easy to make and will help a ton.
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#4
The best you will do is use a lot of speakers (4x12 minimum) and a boost pedal/compressor pedal will help thicken it up also. There is no way to accurately reproduce the sound you here on a recording, but you can still have a big, beefy tone live.

What amp and guitar do you have?
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#5
Quote by Robbgnarly
The best you will do is use a lot of speakers (4x12 minimum) and a boost pedal/compressor pedal will help thicken it up also. There is no way to accurately reproduce the sound you here on a recording, but you can still have a big, beefy tone live.

What amp and guitar do you have?

Oh i just have a combo amp. a 65 watt Delta Mofset Lead. this was a curious question for future gear planing Luckily, my amp does have a jack for cabs and sounds really good for what it's worth. the only problem is that my tone is really "lonesome" and even when i'm tuned to Drop C with my Roxbury Legend Custom, it doesnt have as much punch or chug as my strat knockoff tuned in E with cobalt strings. Are the standard Humbuckers not really suited for lower tunings? I also just looked at the website of my local music store and looked at Cabinets. I was looking at the descriptions and came across the term "power handling". Does that mean my amp needs to put out the wattage described in the power handling? Doesn't seem like 65watts will do anything if that's the case.
Last edited by Norgz94 at Dec 2, 2013,
#6
Quote by Robbgnarly
There is no way to accurately reproduce the sound you here on a recording, but you can still have a big, beefy tone live.


you can get really really close with a wet/dry set up....in fact if you watch any doug aldrich video and wonder how he gets that massive sound...W/D
#7
Al that has been said are great advices. Other simple tips are for your case:

Pump up those mids and reduce the gain a little bit. Most guitar players think that putting the gain at 13 and the mids at -5 is cool because it sounds good for chunck. BUT this is not really the way to fill the gaps between frequencies. Set your mids at least as 4 (out of 10), reduce the gain a bit and turn up the volume to compensate.

Use some reverb. Reverb fill the space between notes, find a way to put a bit into your sound. It will change your life.

Delay is algo a great way to fill some space. and make your guitar sound like it's been double (two guitar players playing the same thing.

Reduce de compression. We ALL love to compress our guitar sound, it makes us fill great to be able to hold on notes, but sometimes too much compression kill a bit the natural ring and headroom of the notes. If you use a compressor reduce the amount of it in your signal.