#1
Hi ... when practicing alternate picking I've notice that if I isolate hands and eg. do just the right hand picking. I feel it's way more difficult than with both hands (in particular when crossing strings, be it inside or outside picking movement.

So my question for the more experienced ones is: praticing isolated hands is a good idea?

ps. not sure but I think Troy Stetina or Michael Angelo talked about it once???
#2
Start practicing with both hands, since it's really a two-handed operation unless you're simply tremelo picking one string. (Which isn't a bad thing to practice in and of itself).

The thing you need to get out of your practice is the perfect synchronization of both hands. You're not going to get that by practicing both hands separately. At least that's my opinion, I don't know what others may think.
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#3
Why would you practice alternate picking with one hand if it's a 2 hand technique? Makes no sense to me. You're not practicing legato exactly.
#4
Yeah, it's really a 2 handed op. and probably the main reason one don't play alternate well is lack of sync, not actually speed! ... but nice to see different opinions ...
#5
Isolating hands and techniques can definitely help. It can Examples would be isolated picking on each string, or repeated hammers and pulls through scales or finger permutations. If you want synchronization, and surely, we all do, a metronome and thousands of slow repetitions are apparently the merciless lock and key! There's 12 Major keys and 12 Minor keys, right? And that's putting it primitively... Scales, arpeggios, sequences...Practice is our favorite word. If it's difficult, I'd personally rejoice in that fact. Now you can work on it not only until it becomes easy, but effortless as well.

Hopefully this isn't too convoluted?
#6
You know what a picking exercise with only your right hand will do? It will make you good at playing with only your right hand. If you want to get better at playing music, play that music.
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