#1
hello,
I need a new guitar for a price at about 800-900€, max 1000€ (which used will be cheaper) and it should have these specs:

St style
24 frets
floating bridge with tremolo
seymour duncans blackouts
set through neck
6 strings (not 7 or 8)

used for melodic death metal and heavy metal

Thanks
#2
Ibanez prestige would be my #1
Assuming you are in Europe, some used Mayones might be doable for that price range
Jackson DK2FS
Fernandes FR-65

Morley pro series pedal
BBE two time Delay
Empress Nebulus
Subdecay Quantum Quasar
Solid Gold FX Nitro

Blackstar HT stage 100
Marshal 1922 2x12 (V-30, Greenback)
#4
Now I have a jackson low end guitar witch passive pickups and a bolt on neck and a fender mustang 1 V2 amp. I'm gonna change both though
It's a starter kit pretty much, maybe a bit better, but it's one of those combinations that can play almost everything decently but nothing good. Just to get started and figure out what you want to play in the future. I'll change my amp, but the guitar has higher priority, because I'll set up a room to play with my friends in the future and there I'll need an amp that can hold up to a drummer.
#5
I'd get a new amp before a guitar.


Also, American Luthier did a study and concluded that in 3 separate and independent tests that Bolt-On necks had the longest sustain of any neck joint type. Just to try and combat that old misnomer.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#6
the problem with bolt on is that when I get on the 22nd-23rd-24th fret, it gets in my way
#7
all access neck joint sorts that. like on ibanez prestiges.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
Quote by Heideck
Ibanez prestige would be my #1
Assuming you are in Europe, some used Mayones might be doable for that price range


^+1.

also, here might be some options for you:

Klick me .

Now you might have some problems with those specific PUs you want in your future guitar. So you might concider buying a guitar with any cheap PUs and buying your SD seperately.
Ibanez S570DXQM-BBB
DiMarzio Evolution HSH
Ibanez RG927WBBZ-TGF
DiMarzio Evolution 7 & DiMarzio LiquiFire 7
Peavey Valve King 112, Peavey Vypyr 15
Harley Benton NG-100, Ibanez Weeping Demon

Quote by metalmingee
In fact, wanting different tunings is one of the best reasons to convince others that you need more guitars.
#9
is ibanez prestige a series right? couldn't find it
sorry I'm not very familiar with ibanez guitars
#10
Let me help you. Here are some interessting offers I found. You might have to buy your Duncans seperately, though, because Ibanez usually has either DiMarzio pickups or Infinities (which, as far as I know, are also manufactured by DiMarzio).

http://www.thomann.de/gb/ibanez_rg970qmz_bdk.htm
-> I've tried a similar guitar. I liked it. You'd have to make sure wheter you like the RG or the S form, because these are the most frequent forms Ibanez Guitars come in.

http://www.thomann.de/gb/ibanez_s920e_bk.htm
Don't know wheter active EMGs are an options, also HH-Configuration.

Also, Schecter has a lot of guitars with SD pickups. But I only found two with Blackouts, which are basically the same guitar, only different colour.
http://www.thomann.de/gb/schecter_diamond_c1_blackjack_atx_fr_b.htm
and
http://www.thomann.de/gb/schecter_diamond_c1_blackjack_atx_fr_w.htm
Both are slightly above your top price range, though.
Ibanez S570DXQM-BBB
DiMarzio Evolution HSH
Ibanez RG927WBBZ-TGF
DiMarzio Evolution 7 & DiMarzio LiquiFire 7
Peavey Valve King 112, Peavey Vypyr 15
Harley Benton NG-100, Ibanez Weeping Demon

Quote by metalmingee
In fact, wanting different tunings is one of the best reasons to convince others that you need more guitars.
#11
Quote by JustRooster



Also, American Luthier did a study and concluded that in 3 separate and independent tests that Bolt-On necks had the longest sustain of any neck joint type. Just to try and combat that old misnomer.


Just so you know, that study has been seriously discredited, and it was not done by "American Luthier." It was, however, published in American Lutherie, which is not a particularly authoritative source for...well...anything. American Lutherie is the quarterly magazine published by a non-profit group (club, if you will) and is the main benefit of belonging to the GAL (Guild of American Luthiers). Articles are largely vanity pieces and how-to articles submitted by members for the consumption of other members, but American Lutherie doesn't approve or disapprove of the content, nor does it endorse the authors or the articles in any way.

For starters, there were not three separate or independent tests. Nor were guitars involved at all. The "test" was highly unscientific. The author of the article, who has little to no scientific background and no particular reputation among guitar builders, built some bench fixtures in his shop that he believes simulated a set neck and a bolt neck. These held a single string. There was nothing to govern the force of the pluck, etc. He *recorded* the sound produced and then played it back to a very small number of people who were asked to pick which sounds seemed to sustain longer on the recording. There's no data as to the methodology of the recording, even. The results of the test were inconclusive. The gentleman then published the article in a magazine that accepts almost anything from its members. Last time I inquired, in order to get a copy of the article, you have to purchase it from American Lutherie in Tacoma Washington.

Before you quote something like this, you need to read the actual article. Then you need to analyze whether the methodology was even remotely scientific. Then you need to read the actual results. Then you need to determine whether the data was conclusive or statistically significant. In each instance, the answer is, unsurprisingly, "No."
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 4, 2013,
#12
Quote by Dave_Mc
all access neck joint sorts that. like on ibanez prestiges.


It helps, but it doesn't really eliminate the clunkiness -- just reduces it. Compare that neck joint to, say, a Carvin or Jackson neck-through, or the one on the Gibson Axcess or the old Yamaha Weddington Custom.

That said, I'm a fan of smooth neck-through guitars, but have been playing a guitar that has a somewhat tamed bolt neck (like the All-Access), and I'm really not having a lot of problems with those last couple of frets.
#13
Quote by dspellman
Just so you know, that study has been seriously discredited, and it was not done by "American Luthier." It was, however, published in American Lutherie, which is not a particularly authoritative source for...well...anything. American Lutherie is the quarterly magazine published by a non-profit group (club, if you will) and is the main benefit of belonging to the GAL (Guild of American Luthiers). Articles are largely vanity pieces and how-to articles submitted by members for the consumption of other members, but American Lutherie doesn't approve or disapprove of the content, nor does it endorse the authors or the articles in any way.

For starters, there were not three separate or independent tests. Nor were guitars involved at all. The "test" was highly unscientific. The author of the article, who has little to no scientific background and no particular reputation among guitar builders, built some bench fixtures in his shop that he believes simulated a set neck and a bolt neck. These held a single string. There was nothing to govern the force of the pluck, etc. He *recorded* the sound produced and then played it back to a very small number of people who were asked to pick which sounds seemed to sustain longer on the recording. There's no data as to the methodology of the recording, even. The results of the test were inconclusive. The gentleman then published the article in a magazine that accepts almost anything from its members. Last time I inquired, in order to get a copy of the article, you have to purchase it from American Lutherie in Tacoma Washington.

Before you quote something like this, you need to read the actual article. Then you need to analyze whether the methodology was even remotely scientific. Then you need to read the actual results. Then you need to determine whether the data was conclusive or statistically significant. In each instance, the answer is, unsurprisingly, "No."



I own the actual magazine. I'm familiar with it.

Your tangent is entirely beside the point that bolt on necks don't suffer from sustain issues. Bad bolt on necks, to, but so do bad set necks and bad neck thrus. It isn't about the neck pocket, when it comes to sustain, it's about the quality.

I don't know why you have such a boner for me, man. It seems like you're posts are very contrarian to all of mine almost purposely.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Dec 4, 2013,
#15
Quote by Jayerrr
is ibanez prestige a series right? couldn't find it
sorry I'm not very familiar with ibanez guitars


yeah with the rgs it's anything 1570 and up

http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/eg_series13.php?series_id=147&area_id=3&year=2013&cat_id=1

the ones at the top there after the iron labels. it says "prestige" under their model numbers.

Quote by dspellman
It helps, but it doesn't really eliminate the clunkiness -- just reduces it.


granted.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#16
Quote by JustRooster
I own the actual magazine. I'm familiar with it.

Your tangent is entirely beside the point that bolt on necks don't suffer from sustain issues. Bad bolt on necks, to, but so do bad set necks and bad neck thrus. It isn't about the neck pocket, when it comes to sustain, it's about the quality.

I don't know why you have such a boner for me, man. It seems like you're posts are very contrarian to all of mine almost purposely.


Nah, love you mang.

And actually, you're correct; there are a LOT of factors besides the neck join method that determine how well a guitar sustains. I'm not a fan of bolt-neck guitars in large part because the neck heel is generally clunky. I'm playing the heck out of one at the moment, though, and the neck heel (one of those smoothed-out things like the all-access version) isn't an issue at all, for playability OR sustain.

I just hate to see that goofy article quoted as if it were useful.