#1
Okay so i currently have a Zoom g3 which im pretty happy with. I get all the sounds I really need from it since i do no serious gigging or anything.
But Ive heard in alot of places that although multi fx units are great for delays and reverbs etc, they simply don't compare for overdrives and distortions.

So whats the difference.

Say if i put the Zoom G3 tubescreamer model up against a Digitech Bad Monkey.

Would the digitech be noticeably more pleasant ?


If it matters - i have a fender stratocaster through a Vibro champ xd on a classic marshall model usually - or the bassman model. Either way - that real warm sound just on the edge of breakup.
"I think the most important thing about music is the sense of escape." - Thom Yorke
#2
probably- through a tube amp. your amp is sorta part tube, part modelling so that complicates things a bit. i'm not sure how it reacts to a boost.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Quote by Dave_Mc
probably- through a tube amp. your amp is sorta part tube, part modelling so that complicates things a bit. i'm not sure how it reacts to a boost.


It reacts pretty well to picking dynamics, i can go from pretty clean to some nice bite if i dig in
"I think the most important thing about music is the sense of escape." - Thom Yorke
#4
The "Great Muff" is surprisingly accurate but the od's/distortions don't come close. Its night and day.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#5
Yes. It's very very different. I would say even the reverb and delay, depending on application, can be very different when we're talking about a pedal board with stand-alone effects. There are some that a Multi-FX will do well, but a lot of them are missing key tonal qualities, depths and options that the real stand-alones do have. You also lose the option to set your signal chain up the way YOU want to.

Multi-FX is good for bedroom and even small gigs, but if you're looking for professional sound, you want to invest in a pedal board with the effects you need on it.

One way to think of it, is that if you were to take 10 stand-alones and put them right up against each other, it'd be about the dimensions of a standard multi-effects which is pre-loaded with 100s of effects, amp sims, and presets. It just makes more sense, to me at least, that the tonal quality would suffer when you're trying to fit 100s of effects into the chip-space that about 10 effects fit into.

I kinda thought at first that it was just people being elitist and that multi-FX was just as good (used to love my Boss GT-10). Then I got a few real pedals just to try the whole thing out. You wouldn't believe the difference. It can make your rig go from sounding pretty good to sounding phenomenal.
Last edited by mjones1992 at Dec 4, 2013,
#6
Bad Monkies cost like $40. Buy one and see for yourself.
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#7
Quote by Caaarrl94
It reacts pretty well to picking dynamics, i can go from pretty clean to some nice bite if i dig in


Oh yeah, it's a pretty nice amp, and I liked the one I tried, but that still doesn't mean it'll necessarily react to an od pedal used as a boost like a tube input stage will.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#8
I like my G3, it does exactly what I want it to.....except I don't use it for OD & distortion. I use separate pedals for my drives, and they definitely blow away the equivalent models on the G3.

It's great for the occasional bit of delay & modulation and I'd always recommend it for that, but I wouldn't recommend it if you're mainly after it's drives.
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#9
Quote by GaryBillington
I like my G3, it does exactly what I want it to.....except I don't use it for OD & distortion. I use separate pedals for my drives, and they definitely blow away the equivalent models on the G3.

It's great for the occasional bit of delay & modulation and I'd always recommend it for that, but I wouldn't recommend it if you're mainly after it's drives.


perfect, exactly the answer i was looking for. thanks alot
"I think the most important thing about music is the sense of escape." - Thom Yorke
#10
No worries

If you only play at home, the G3 is great - I do use the drives & amp sims for headphone practice, but if you're gigging you'd be far better off with separate pedals for your drives. As you say you aren't gigging, only you can decide if separate pedals are worth the investment.

They can be had for cheap though, especially if you keep your eye on the used market. There are always loads out there, you just have to be patient with finding the one you want. The other good thing with buying used is if you don't like a pedal, you can sell it on & be pretty confident you'll get back most, if not all of what you paid for it.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#11
I have a Digitech RP250 multi-fx. Pretty much any amp or pedal on it that uses gain is really crappy. Meanwhile, the reverb and delay effects are excellent, and the wah and a few other things sound good too.
#12
I was thinking about this the other day (this sort of question comes up every now and then)...
If you want a great steak, would you go to a buffet (Multi-fx), or go to a steak house (Overdrive/Distortion pedal)?
#13
Quote by Caaarrl94
Okay so i currently have a Zoom g3 which im pretty happy with. I get all the sounds I really need from it since i do no serious gigging or anything.
But Ive heard in alot of places that although multi fx units are great for delays and reverbs etc, they simply don't compare for overdrives and distortions.

So whats the difference?


what is the technical difference?

something like a TS9 uses thru-hole components on printed circuit boards to manipulate a signal. usually some kinda op-amp or transistor that amplifies the signal a little bit and induces an intended distortion. there is also other components that buffer the signal or change frequency content (EQ).

something like a badmonkey is very similar, it just uses smaller components (surface mount) and maybe some cheaper parts to keep costs low.

something like a multi-effects unit can use pretty much one of two routes to simulate an OD:

1) it can contain op-amps and analog components that are 'moved' in the signal path via a complex switching system. the pedal can then store digital information that will arrange components to simulate a certain pedal. i believe this is how pedals like the boss 'dual pedal' distortion pedal is set up (not too sure though).

2) it can convert the signal to a digital signal and process the digital signal via DSP chips.

the 2nd version is more popular, and it is also claimed that these 'digital' distortion pedals sound like crap. what is usually not mentioned is that there are different ways of 'processing' a digital signal, like you can just change wave forms with algorithms bases on transforms of the input and output signal of a pedal or you can actually simulate the circuit path of a pedal and run the digital signal through it.

those are just two ways i am familiar with, there is probably more. the point is the results of one method to another can be quite different. also the hardware (preamps, A/D converters and DSP processing chips) can also have a big influence on results. for example compare a L6 spider's amp sims to a Kemper's amp sims to a Universal Audio (UA) amp sim. these companies use way different hardware and different techniques in their emulation, and UA has digital plug-ins that have changed my entire conception about digital emulation.

the bottomline? it's not an easy comparison, digital technology is still developing in this market and the best way to find out if you prefer the g3's OD's sound rather than a bad monkey is to do a double blind comparison.

of course the easy answer is also to just go with something tried and true. analog OD's are a sound that is desired and there is no way of getting a better analog OD tone than using an analog OD. if digital OD's end up 'surpassing' analog OD's in tone then technically general consensus will prefer the 'digital sound' at that time.

Quote by CodeMonk
I was thinking about this the other day (this sort of question comes up every now and then)...
If you want a great steak, would you go to a buffet (Multi-fx), or go to a steak house (Overdrive/Distortion pedal)?


well, if you put it like that then there doesn't seem to be much of a choice.

i don't seem agree with that analogy though.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#14
Quote by gumbilicious
...

...Stuff...


well, if you put it like that then there doesn't seem to be much of a choice.

i don't seem agree with that analogy though.


I'd rather have one pedal do that does that one thing very well, than have one pedal that does multiple thing fairly well.


I've been to a lot of buffets in my day. There's one on nearly every corner in Nevada.
Some are known for good roast beef though steak have rarely been their strong suit.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Dec 5, 2013,
#15
Quote by CodeMonk
I'd rather have one pedal do that does that one thing very well, than have one pedal that does multiple thing fairly well.


I've been to a lot of buffets in my day. There's one on nearly every corner in Nevada.
Some are known for good roast beef though steak have rarely been their strong suit.


i may be cherry picking from the group, but it i was still very impressed by what i heard from UA products. it kinda stripped my blind bias toward analog (even though if you look at my board, you will see almost exclusively analog pedals)

i also think you still get a better bang for buck buying tried and true analog pedals rather than buying something like a UA apollo, but nothing i have heard from UA sounds like it does 'multiple things fairly well', it's all very top notch and easily competes with any stand alone pedal i have encountered.

they are a very top notch buffet that doesn't seem to suffer from the wide variety of food offered.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Dec 5, 2013,
#16
Yeah, the upper end stuff is getting better all the time.
I liked the Axe FX when I heard one for the first time a few years ago.
Although Dweezil Zappa was playing it in a hotel room (Seriously, the L.A. Amp show around 2010 or 2011), each separate "booth" was in a hotel room, some companies shared a room)).
Last edited by CodeMonk at Dec 5, 2013,
#17
Quote by CodeMonk
Yeah, the upper end stuff is getting better all the time.
I liked the Axe FX when I heard one for the first time a few years ago.
Although Dweezil Zappa was playing it in a hotel room (Seriously, the L.A. Amp show around 2010 or 2011), each separate "booth" was in a hotel room, some companies shared a room)).


i have yet to have any extensive time with an axe fx or kemper so i try not to state much about them. i have been impressed by how much better my computer modelers sound when i stated using my eureka channel strip instead of plugging straight into the interface though.

really, one of the most attractive things to me with analog pedals is the fact that you don't have to interface with a GUI. it seems that many digital emulators (M9, kemper, etc) are using more of a standard pedal or amp based interface and that appeals to me more.

i think that analog pedals and non-modeled amps will still deliver the best sound for the money for some time to come. but some companies are delivering a good 'taste of the future' right now. i have to say it looks promising.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae