#1
Hey guys, my haze 40 keeps blowing the 250v fuse. now i researched and found something about a burnt tube. when my amp in overdrive by my pedal board i noticed my right hand power tube( i believe this is a power tube as it is the larger of the five in the amp.)was bright orange and the left was no where as nearly hot.
The fuse is another issue. the label says T2ae 250v. T2ae is foreign to me and i have no idea what that means. now in reserch some claim its a 500ma fuse but i am not sure
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tl;dr- marshall haze 40 blows 250v main power fuse over and over, one tube glows super bright while the rest glow normal then fuse blows out. what the hell is a t2ae 250v fuse?
Ibanez sz720fm,Ibbly RG350DX, Custom Tele-> Dunlop 535Q->RAT Pro co II-> Ibanez Fuzz->Marshall Haze 40.
Tascam US-800 and a hand full of Mics into Nedundo 4

my music, new recording on the way in 2014

[B]insert witty italicized quote here
#2
T2AE is a 2 amp 250v fuse iirc.

The tubes glowing bright red like that is called red-plating. If the amp is red-plating, you have a very serious problem.

If an amp blows a fuse, it does so for a reason. Don't keep plugging in new fuses until you find and fix the cause of the blown fuses.

If it were me I would just take it to a competent tech.
#3
Perhaps the tube that's dimmer than the other power tube isn't getting enough power for it to work so it all goes into one tube then the fuse cuts out? There could be a bad connection with the tube socket, most likely a bad solder connection.
#4
Quote by Teaisfantastic
Perhaps the tube that's dimmer than the other power tube isn't getting enough power for it to work so it all goes into one tube then the fuse cuts out

Oh boy that is not how tubes work at all. The power supply doesn't push power at the tubes and hope for the best. Tubes draw power, so if a tube were not getting enough current it would simply not amplify correctly and the output would drop or the amp would sound mushy. The problem would have already occurred; there's not a scenario in a working amp where a tube cannot draw power.

If the one tube is redplating (not sure, from the description), what probably happened was that both tubes were redplating at one point and then one just burned out and the other is still hanging on. That, plus the constant fuse blowing, points to a power issue. If you haven't worked on an amp before this is not something you should start your learning on. Take it to a tech and have them check it out.

My best guesses are that this is either a bad set of power tubes or sockets, or there's a short in the power supply, your power transformer is going haywire, or your home wiring is bad.

You'll want to ask the tech to look out for things that could have been caused by bad house wiring. Call an electrician if your tech suspects it.
#5
hey guys thanks for the input.
I dont think my house wiring is bad but i had never taken that into consideration so i will test some of my plugs with my grandfather.
Now the red plating is a power supply issue would issuing new tubes be a logical point to start out at after checking my transistors and other vulnerable points?
also other sources(Reddit) tell me the fuse is a 500ma fuse but that is the internet for me.
Ibanez sz720fm,Ibbly RG350DX, Custom Tele-> Dunlop 535Q->RAT Pro co II-> Ibanez Fuzz->Marshall Haze 40.
Tascam US-800 and a hand full of Mics into Nedundo 4

my music, new recording on the way in 2014

[B]insert witty italicized quote here
#6
Also i looked up red plating and my tube was surely doing this.
Ibanez sz720fm,Ibbly RG350DX, Custom Tele-> Dunlop 535Q->RAT Pro co II-> Ibanez Fuzz->Marshall Haze 40.
Tascam US-800 and a hand full of Mics into Nedundo 4

my music, new recording on the way in 2014

[B]insert witty italicized quote here
#7
Yeah, this needs to go to a tech. If it's the power supply, you don't want to put new tubes in, you'll just burn those out too.
#8
I think i'm going to attempt a bias with some guys at my local shop using my old power tubes as experimentation material since their on their way out anyway and see what that yeilds. also if anyone who reads this thread from the grave any information on a T2AE fuse would be great
Ibanez sz720fm,Ibbly RG350DX, Custom Tele-> Dunlop 535Q->RAT Pro co II-> Ibanez Fuzz->Marshall Haze 40.
Tascam US-800 and a hand full of Mics into Nedundo 4

my music, new recording on the way in 2014

[B]insert witty italicized quote here
#10
If I remember correctly the AE denotes that it is a slo-blow and if I recall you need a slow blow otherwise it'll trip every time you start it up.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#12
Thanks so much guys, i'd send you beautiful women(or men if your a lady,) and drinks if i could lol.
since i bumped up again can someone give me a run down of the difference b/t a127x and ecc86/88 pre amp tubes?
also to those who replied before and have been checking in on me i have open up my amp and my circuitry shows no signs of shorting on the board and i believe my bias was my issue. in research people attest that the bias was 39ma on one EL34 and 59ma on their other-this surely is my issues that lead to on one red-plating power tube.

thanks for all the help and future help, you all have been great.
Ibanez sz720fm,Ibbly RG350DX, Custom Tele-> Dunlop 535Q->RAT Pro co II-> Ibanez Fuzz->Marshall Haze 40.
Tascam US-800 and a hand full of Mics into Nedundo 4

my music, new recording on the way in 2014

[B]insert witty italicized quote here
#13
12AX7 is a standard preamp tube, its European designation is ECC83. ECC86 and ECC88 tubes are rarely used in guitar amps and are not directly interchangeable with the 12AX7. Not much use in looking at those tubes, honestly. There's a long list of mods more productive than modifying your amp to take an obscure preamp tube not known for its distortion characteristics.

If your bias is that high there's a reason for it - check that the bias circuit is within spec before putting new tubes in there. Amps are usually biased very cold from the factory, if all of a sudden the bias got so hot that it redplated the tubes I'd be concerned something was wrong in that supply.
#14
If the bias is high it could be that the dropping resistors that supply the bias current could have drifted out of tolerance. Resistors practically always drift high which would reduce bias current. Other stuff like running too hot would cause their resistance to drop, increasing bias current.

Might want to have the power supply checked out. If any out of spec resistors are found, it would be a good idea to replace them with a higher wattage rating. Factories typically use as low a wattage rating as they need to keep the amp working as long as the warranty applies. The rule of thumb is to use at least double the calculated wattage needed.