#1
I'm just wondering,

if you are a creator of a digital product, regardless of what it is, you are the owner and this product is not free- it's sold. If you happen to come across some torrent site that has a copy of whatever your product is and people can download it for free, is it a crime for you to do it?

I know that very few people get arrested for pirating online, but, hypothetically, let's imagine that you had sex with someone with whom it's not entirely legal to have sex, and in the process of investigation, it's discovered that your PC contains copies of your own products which were pirated. So, could they add an additional charge for piracy?
#2
No, as it is your intellectual property and you have rights that others do not have.

/thread
RIP Tom Searle.
#4
unless you signed to a label and they own the rights to the music.
CuSO4

"I don't have an instrument, I don't have a great voice, I just have some nice clothes maybe." paul rutherford
#5
i remember during high school when they start pushing the whole citation agenda thing one of my teachers said something like "even if you were quoting yourself from something you made you'd still have to cite it"

pretty sure that's completely irrelevant but why not yknow it's 6am sunday minus 8 cloudy cut me some slack




#6
online piracy is mostly a civil issue, not a criminal one so it wouldn't matter, they also would have quite a bit of difficulty proving that you pirated stuff, and didn't buy it, "illegal downloading" is only sort of illegal
#7
unless someone else has copyrights on that stuff.

a good example is the Creedence Clearwater Revival. They sued the author later whne he quit the band cause his songs were too much like... well his songs. He had given away all the rights to his music in CCR and later was sued for plagiarizing his own music. Seems stupid but when the company owns the rights to your property not you it means you're in shit.


so unless something like that happened with you, then you'll be good to download your own stuff.

It's like eating at your restaurant and not paying for it. Nobody's gonna sue you cause at the end of the month you're gonna have your own expenses subtracted from your income... if you know what i mean
#9
It kinda depends on your country's legislation, but downloading usually isn't what gets you convicted: it's sharing the pirated content with others. Now if you own the exclusive distribution rights to your own material I don't see a problem: I mean, the only party being 'affected' by your actions is... well you

But usually that's not how it works: if you're a recording artist, a programmer, a writer or whatever and you're planning to release a physical product (say, a record or book) you've most likely made a deal with a record label, publisher, printer, etc. (unless of course you plan to produce, package, distribute and sell the physical product yourself which is highly unlikely). That deal usually entitles those third parties to a share of the profits, and if you choose to distribute your material for free against their wishes, even if you're the sole creative force behind it, then yes: they can take you to court based on the fact that you cheated them out of some potential revenue

Nowadays a lot of material is being released independently thanks to the internets, and in those cases it's obviously a lot easier for people to do whatever they want with their stuff. Not being tied to the obligation of releasing a certain number of records, being able to collaborate with whomever you like without the objection of rival labels, giving away stuff for free if it pleases you to do so, not being subjected to censorship, not being forced to sign to a (major) label in the first place because there's other options available... I mean, artists that were signed to an indie label couldn't DREAM of such freedoms a couple of years ago. So yeah, opting for a career as a recording artist doesn't seem to be as profitable as it once was but I can certainly see the benefits of the current developments in the music industry

Hold on, what was your question again?

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
#10
Quote by MinterMan22
i remember during high school when they start pushing the whole citation agenda thing one of my teachers said something like "even if you were quoting yourself from something you made you'd still have to cite it"

pretty sure that's completely irrelevant but why not yknow it's 6am sunday minus 8 cloudy cut me some slack

Citing your sources keeps things kosher copyright-wise and insures transparency in your work. You have to cite because people have to be able to see what material you used in writing your paper.
I've seen people complain about and I just kinda wonder if they know how academic works at all.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#11
Quote by Wormholes
Why am I the first person to mention op is being investigated for being a pedo?


Because,

Quote by Aralingh
hypothetically, let's imagine


The whole question is more about how internet piracy laws are actually defined.
Last edited by Aralingh at Dec 8, 2013,
#12
Quote by Aralingh
The whole question is more about how internet piracy laws are actually defined.


But you took a rather strange example to make that clear.
"Don’t be a guitarist. Be a musician."

Steve Howe
#13
Quote by von gelb
But you took a rather strange example to make that clear.


Yes.
#14
If a record label gave you the money to record, they own the recording of the song, so yes, I would imagine technically you could be held accountable.
#15
A more interesting question would be, can you sue your friends when they download your music

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#16
Quote by Vendetta V
unless someone else has copyrights on that stuff.

a good example is the Creedence Clearwater Revival. They sued the author later whne he quit the band cause his songs were too much like... well his songs. He had given away all the rights to his music in CCR and later was sued for plagiarizing his own music. Seems stupid but when the company owns the rights to your property not you it means you're in shit.


so unless something like that happened with you, then you'll be good to download your own stuff.
n


Yep, specifically it was "Run Through the Jungle" and "Old Man Down the Road"

However, John Fogerty won that suit as it was deemed "impossible to plagarise ones self"
#17
Quote by xxdarrenxx
A more interesting question would be, can you sue your friends when they download your music


Yes, BUT

I am now interested in whether or not your government can arrest you for putting out your intellectual property that you sell through official sources, but at the same time, distribute it freely, illegally if possible? Is the law written in such a way, that you can get sued by the state, not an individual, for breaking the law stated?
Last edited by Aralingh at Dec 8, 2013,
#18
Quote by MinterMan22
i remember during high school when they start pushing the whole citation agenda thing one of my teachers said something like "even if you were quoting yourself from something you made you'd still have to cite it"

pretty sure that's completely irrelevant but why not yknow it's 6am sunday minus 8 cloudy cut me some slack

A big part of referencing is so people who read your stuff can go and get those same sources and see what you're talking about, so if you're quoting or directly referring to something you previously said, you still need to reference it.

Also I know at my uni at least, you can't get credited twice for the same work, so if you're going to give the same material you've previously been marked on, you need to make clear you know this and that you're not just attempting to credit the same work again.
#19
Quote by Wormholes
Why am I the first person to mention op is being investigated for being a pedo?


What in the what now? You serious?
#20
Quote by jugglingfreak
Yep, specifically it was "Run Through the Jungle" and "Old Man Down the Road"

However, John Fogerty won that suit as it was deemed "impossible to plagarise ones self"

thanks


while it might be impossible to plagiarize one self he still didn't get the rights to use the first song anyways. so If he put that song for sale on his website or gave it away for free he'd still be dealing with a material that he doesnt own
#21
Well if we're talking about music, that yes you can get into legal trouble. Music is broken down into 2 copyrights: the Master and the Composition.

The record label pays for the recording to be done so they own the master/recording of that song.
But the lyrics, riffs, rhythms all belong to you since you wrote them.

If you recorded something yourself, paid by yourself then I don't think you get yourself into trouble since you would then own 100% of both copyrights.
If Rock is a life-style, then Metal's an addiction

Yelloooow!


Of The


UG Challenge

#22
That was one of the sketchiest hypotheticals I've ever read. Anyway, you can be found having plagiarized yourself, but this isn't being used in a separate piece, so, probably not.
#23
Quote by TenTonHammer
You would have to sue yourself, which, quite frankly, seems stupid.


Suing yourself you say?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#24
Quote by Aralingh
I'm just wondering,

if you are a creator of a digital product, regardless of what it is, you are the owner and this product is not free- it's sold. If you happen to come across some torrent site that has a copy of whatever your product is and people can download it for free, is it a crime for you to do it?

I know that very few people get arrested for pirating online, but, hypothetically, let's imagine that you had sex with someone with whom it's not entirely legal to have sex, and in the process of investigation, it's discovered that your PC contains copies of your own products which were pirated. So, could they add an additional charge for piracy?


Depends on the contract you sign with whatever digital distributor you use. If you're distributing it yourself, then there's no problem.
but if you're using a company like amazon or apple, you could get in trouble.

Here's a real life analogy:
you make bracelets and have a deal with a store to sell them, and split the profits.
one day a man comes in and steals a nice amount of the bracelets and runs off, you see him later giving away your bracelets for free, so you go ahead and take one.

It's still stolen property, and the store you have a deal with can press charges.

But again, if you're selling the bracelets from your garage, someone steals them and is giving them out for free. If you were to get one, you wouldn't press charges on yourself.


and you had sex with a minor or something?
It's over simplified, So what!

Quote by eGraham
I'm going to be on top of what is called a knob
Quote by theguitarist
Big ones can be fun in some ways but generally, they are a pain in the ass.
Quote by Wolfinator-x
I don't know what is going on in this thread or why I have an erection.
#25
" let's imagine
that you had sex with someone with whom it's
not entirely legal to have sex, and in the process
of investigation, it's discovered that your PC
contains copies of your own products which were pirated."

wait wat?.....
#26
what if I make a cd, and make a deal with a shop to sell them. Would I get in trouble for taking one?
Eat your pheasant
Drink your wine
Your days are numbered, bourgeois swine!
#27
The situation is absolutely hypothetical, I did not have sex with A minor.

The reason I mention this is because you're unlikely to be arrested for downloading illegal copies of whatever, so, you have to be arrested for any good reason that warrants a search only for investigators to later discover that you also have illegal copies of whatever product you had gotten so they can charge that to you as an additional crime since you are already caught.

As I said, the real question is how the piracy laws are governed and enforced, as well as the legal definition of an illegal activity in this context.