#1
I've been recording guitars with a Sennheiser e835 lately (which I now realize is a vocal mic, but I was the victim of GC marketing when I bought it ), and my distorted tracks constantly sound thin and fizzy. If I place the mic farther off center to eliminate the fizz, it sounds muddy and muffled. I was thinking of picking up a used SM57 or other mic in that price range to A/B with the Sennheiser and see if I like it. Would the SM57 be an improvement? Are there any other mics I should try before making a call?
#2
Looking at the frequency response graphs of a 57 and an e835 they're not particularly different, the e835 has a much smoother curve but that's it really. So I'd be tempted to say that getting a different mic won't fix your problem.

Have you tried placing the mic off axis rather than off center? i.e. place it infront of the center and point it towards the edge (or place it infront of an edge and point it towards the center).
#3
In practice, I have both of those mics. They don't usually sound much different, but I would describe the 835 as smoother and more natural sounding. I LOVE it for live vocals. It really is a great mic.

That said, you might be right in blaming the mic, and you might not be. Have you tried putting your ear to where the mic is going to see if it sounds thin and fizzy there? You might be surprised at what you hear. If your amp is blowing your pant legs around, I'll remind you that you don't have ears in your knees. ;-) It makes a difference where you listen from. The secret might actually be in adjusting the tone or gain of your amp.

It could also be your room, but if you're close-miking, it is probably less of an issue.

Also try experimenting moving the mic on and off-axis, and towards the center of the dust cap (you might be too close to here already), or more likely, towards the edge of the speaker, or 2/3 of the way towards the edge. These will all make significant differences.

That all said, a couple of other mic choices could be:

Sennheiser MD421 - FAN-TASTIC mic for guitar amps. From the first time I used it, it became my go-to mic for guitar amps.

Sennheiser 609 or 906 - built specifically with toms and guitar cabs in mind, they're a lot less expensive than the 421. However, they won't sound much different than the SM57 or the 835, I don't think.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
Hmm, thanks. I guess I'll be messing around with the positioning some more.

Quote by axemanchris
If your amp is blowing your pant legs around, I'll remind you that you don't have ears in your knees. ;-) It makes a difference where you listen from.

It could also be your room, but if you're close-miking, it is probably less of an issue.


I actually have my amp up on a chair so that it's around ear level when I sit down, and I have it dialed in at that height.

Quote by axemanchris
That all said, a couple of other mic choices could be:

Sennheiser MD421 - FAN-TASTIC mic for guitar amps. From the first time I used it, it became my go-to mic for guitar amps.

Sennheiser 609 or 906 - built specifically with toms and guitar cabs in mind, they're a lot less expensive than the 421. However, they won't sound much different than the SM57 or the 835, I don't think.

CT


I was actually in the studio with my band about a week ago and tried a 421 + 57 combo. Absolutely blew me away. I can't afford a 421 though, but it's at the top of my list to save for!

I guess there's no significant difference then. Thanks! Hopefully more people can chime in with their opinions as well.
#5
Quote by ibanez1997

I was actually in the studio with my band about a week ago and tried a 421 + 57 combo. Absolutely blew me away. I can't afford a 421 though, but it's at the top of my list to save for!


Keep an eye on the used market. They come up. I picked mine up for $250. With some effort, you might even be able to get one for $200.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
I know this is a pretty old thread, I ran across it while looking for info on the e835.
Anyhow, Ive done a fair bit of experimenting with micing cabs up for rock & metal, & Ill throw a little of my own experience into the ring for anyone to take what they want.

1st Ill say I like to try doing things different. Some simple proven methods for certain things just mean Im gonna do something else. I dont always wanna sound like the proven method. Sometimes I might end up leading me to the conventional method, but I learned a few things in the process. I know a lot of you have done your own experimenting & this isnt news.

So..

A. Formost, its all subjective.. Depends on what style music your recording, your amp, tone, speaker, mic, etc. Any various combinations can work or not work. Some proven combinations work better than others.

B. The mic of course matters. In micing a cab with most common celestion or eminence speakers, Ive tried a few instrument & vox mics, & I ended up back at the 57. The little resonance chamber & frequencies just seem to work for me.

C. Reflections matter. Internal cab reflections bounce right back thru the cone & to the mic, thats why any certain speaker in a 4x12, & various points around the speaker can sound different. (but usually trying to insulate the inside of your cab isnt good, makes it sound flat & dead.)
Room reflections can matter too. Generally any reflective surfaces too close to the front or sides of the cab arent a great thing..

D. Make sure you arent using shitty mic pre's. I had a little xenyx 302 AI that would constrict the sound, took detail & air away, simple as that everything sucked. Dont need high dollar, just decent.

E. Put on some headphones & move that mic around.. try slightly different axis changes, & positions. test record, then maybe move again... Trial and error. Experimenting can be fun.. or not..


I know most of this isnt earthshattering news, but sometimes its not bad to consider.
Last edited by Riff1234 at Apr 10, 2016,