#1
Was along time since i posted in the forums, are they still alive?

Ah well, recently me and some friends made a band and im the one stuck writing songs for it ( nothing bad with that )

But it feels like all im doing is mashing powerchords and some silly licks here and there.

Even though most music i listen to ( GnR, mötley, motörhead and such ) are made of powerchords, licks , riffs and other cool stuff it feels like i should do more.

SO! what are your best ways to break yourselfs out from just mashing chords?
#2
Trying to create cool melodies on the guitar and adding in some power chords to accentuate the key punctuations of the Rhythm I guess. Personally I love licks that interlocks with the vocal line at the right moment.
#3
Thats a good idea, suits well since im working on improving my melodies and riffs instead of just rushing the same penta scale type riffs i am now :b
#5
Im the only writer because of many reasons but the main reason is because my band mates are worse at their instruments than i am and im well i dont know, decent? :b

The article looks really nice and will be a good read for me on this sleepless night
Last edited by syobdaed at Dec 9, 2013,
#6
Quote by Zerath
Trying to create cool melodies on the guitar and adding in some power chords to accentuate the key punctuations of the Rhythm I guess. Personally I love licks that interlocks with the vocal line at the right moment.


I was thinking about something since im trying to actually learn some theory and all that stuff but interlocking licks with vocal lines and rythm parts are about harmonization?
#7
Transcribe a bunch of songs you love by ear.

The only way I know to write a certain type of music is to be able to HEAR that type of music. Probably your ear is much more comfortable with power chords and so you default to them.

Do a lot of ear training so you can transcribe songs you love. Then sit down to write music, but don't play anything until you have a sound in your head that you want to hear, first.
#8
Quote by HotspurJr
Transcribe a bunch of songs you love by ear.

The only way I know to write a certain type of music is to be able to HEAR that type of music. Probably your ear is much more comfortable with power chords and so you default to them.

Do a lot of ear training so you can transcribe songs you love. Then sit down to write music, but don't play anything until you have a sound in your head that you want to hear, first.


That might be extremly true
#9
sometimes you have to listen to other types of music to appreciate and understand the intricacies of your usual genres.
Quote by archerygenious
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Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#10
So you're comfortable with power chords? Cool. Did you know that in many cases you can add a single note to your basic power chord shape and get a completely different sound out of it?

For instance, in the key of C major.

-------------------------
-------------------------
-------------------------
-----5------------9-----
--7--7------10--10----
--5--5------8----8-----

First of the 4 is your basic A5, or A powerchord. Add that extra note and now you have an A minor 7th voicing that sounds really good with lots of distortion.

Third of the 4 is your basic C5, or C powerchord. Add that extra note and now you have a C major 7th voicing that sounds really good with lots of distortion.

Experiment with those and use your ear to figure out when you can use those in case you haven't learned about constructing chords from scales yet. Hope that helps you out of your rut.
#11
Oh yeah, it's definitely easy to get stuck on power chords with guitar. Been there done that.

Well, first I would memorize the triad and seventh barre chord shapes that you can move around the neck. (Even that might be enough for you to be honest, depending what you're going for) After that I would probably learn to form chords more freely from scales and memorize ALL the notes on the fretboard (a lot of work but worth it)

I would learn at least all the minor and major scales so I could form chords from them. For example C major scale: C D E F G A B. You can form a basic C major triad by taking the 1st, 3rd and 5th degrees: C E G. The good thing with knowing what notes you play is that you can add notes to your chords without having to memorize thousands of different shapes. It's a lot of work, but that is what I would do.
#12
Stuck in a power chord rut, you say? Do something bold and insidious, add a 3rd, make a commitment....
#13
For: onelightminute, : Elintasokas and Captaincranky ( couldnt figure out if i could quote all of your posts in one ).

Since i suck at theory still i don't fully understand all the theory talk but it's a good lesson for me when practicing theory.

I started experementing with double stops since they are close to powerchords but still something else and i have been taking some notes from ac/dc and Izzy the man stradlin.

So with all that, thanks for the reply and my theory and songwriting skills are slowly going up.
¨
Love : Syobdaed.
#14
Oh btw, song covering. Is it really worth it?

By this i mean that i can see the point of covering another song to learn somethings but this is something i've just recently started thinking about.

Never covered more songs than needed for different reasons in the past so yeah, is it really worth it?
#15
Yeah, covering songs is worth it. Whether you like Paul Gilbert or not, he is a great technical player and he says that all he does to improve technique is learn songs.

If you want to simplify what I said earlier, just take your power chord and practice changing/adding notes. Use your ear to hear what sounds good. This would be easier if you record yourself playing a chord, say like an A minor, then experiment with adding notes to power chords that are in the key of A minor while you play over it. Alternatively, even just a droning open A would serve the same purpose, you just need to give your ear a reference point for your experiment. Does that make sense?
Last edited by onelightminute at Dec 14, 2013,
#16
I'm told that "x5" chords are basically needed to play with high gain. Still, some of the hardest and heaviest bands, resort to acoustic, even nylon strung guitar. They even play full triads, and in major keys, no less. Rush and Zep spring immediately to mind.

So, consider toying with an acoustic guitar sometime. Besides, electric riffs generally fare better in the context of a full band, whereas you can pull off acoustic stylings easily solo. A lot of songs are actually written using acoustic guitar and/or piano, then hardened up later.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 14, 2013,
#17
Quote by onelightminute
Yeah, covering songs is worth it. Whether you like Paul Gilbert or not, he is a great technical player and he says that all he does to improve technique is learn songs.

If you want to simplify what I said earlier, just take your power chord and practice changing/adding notes. Use your ear to hear what sounds good. This would be easier if you record yourself playing a chord, say like an A minor, then experiment with adding notes to power chords that are in the key of A minor while you play over it. Alternatively, even just a droning open A would serve the same purpose, you just need to give your ear a reference point for your experiment. Does that make sense?


Yeah a little bit more sense, it sounds like something i've already done when im colouring chords.
#18
Quote by syobdaed
For: onelightminute, : Elintasokas and Captaincranky ( couldnt figure out if i could quote all of your posts in one ).

Since i suck at theory still i don't fully understand all the theory talk but it's a good lesson for me when practicing theory.

I started experementing with double stops since they are close to powerchords but still something else and i have been taking some notes from ac/dc and Izzy the man stradlin.

So with all that, thanks for the reply and my theory and songwriting skills are slowly going up.
¨
Love : Syobdaed.


Yeah, well those double stops are basically triads (full chords) without a fifth.
#19
Quote by Elintasokas
Yeah, well those double stops are basically triads (full chords) without a fifth.



I didn't know that
#21
Quote by Elintasokas
Then you learned something new, which is good :P


Yes :b
#22
Quote by syobdaed
Yeah a little bit more sense, it sounds like something i've already done when im colouring chords.


Yup, that's exactly what you're doing. The power chord is kind of androgynous in the sense that it does not imply major or minor. For instance, an A power chord (A5) could be in the key of A minor OR A major since both chords contain that second note of the power chord. When you add a third (what you are thinking of as double stops) depending on whether you add a third or a flat third (also known as major and minor thirds, respectively) it will imply a tonality, i.e. A minor or A major.

Here's another easy three note chord built off the power chord, A5add9


-------
-------
-------
-9-----
-7-----
-5-----

You can use that one in many instances within a key because only the 3rd and 7th degree of the major scale contain a flat second and this chord contains the natural (not flatted) second.
#23
Quote by onelightminute
Yup, that's exactly what you're doing. The power chord is kind of androgynous in the sense that it does not imply major or minor. For instance, an A power chord (A5) could be in the key of A minor OR A major since both chords contain that second note of the power chord. When you add a third (what you are thinking of as double stops) depending on whether you add a third or a flat third (also known as major and minor thirds, respectively) it will imply a tonality, i.e. A minor or A major.

Here's another easy three note chord built off the power chord, A5add9


-------
-------
-------
-9-----
-7-----
-5-----


You can use that one in many instances within a key because only the 3rd and 7th degree of the major scale contain a flat second and this chord contains the natural (not flatted) second.



Well now we make sense