Page 1 of 2
#1
Hi Everyone, I am a newbie in the guitar world. Now I want to purchase a beginner guitar around $300-400. I have small hands, 7" from thumb to pinky. I've read about Ibanez Mikro with 22" scale, but many people said that its sound is quite horrible. I prefer thicker sound, but since I am still new, I guess when the sound is not too bad I can accept it just for practicing. Could you give some advices in guitar picking? Thanks!
#2
Even with small hands I wouldnt go for mikro guitars. They are aimed for kids with even smaller hands than you. A 24.75" scale should be enough. Your hands may be small but the amount you can stretch your fingers will increase with practice.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#3
It really is all about techniques and tuning. I'm 5'7", and my former instructor can form chords I'll never be able to in standard tuning. Brian Carroll- a.k.a. Buckethead- is 6'8", and has a similar advantage over most other guitarists...

But unless you're significantly smaller than Kaki King- a petite 5'3"- you should do just fine with standard guitars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shYdqbJgQdc
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
Quote by MaaZeus
Even with small hands I wouldnt go for mikro guitars. They are aimed for kids with even smaller hands than you. A 24.75" scale should be enough. Your hands may be small but the amount you can stretch your fingers will increase with practice.


Thanks so much for your reply! I played piano, though amateur, but for a long time already. I guess my hands can only stretch to this length...Do you have some suggestions for 24" scale?
#5
I am 5'4" and my pinky and thumb are very short in ratio to my hand. I will keep practicing though! Hope some day I can get those big chords...

Quote by dannyalcatraz
It really is all about techniques and tuning. I'm 5'7", and my former instructor can form chords I'll never be able to in standard tuning. Brian Carroll- a.k.a. Buckethead- is 6'8", and has a similar advantage over most other guitarists...

But unless you're significantly smaller than Kaki King- a petite 5'3"- you should do just fine with standard guitars.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shYdqbJgQdc
#6
Well, 25.5" is standard scale for Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster style guitars, 24.75 is the standard scale for Gibson Les Paul and SG style guitars, and 24" scale guitars are usually things like the Fender Jaguars.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Dec 10, 2013,
#7
Quote by dannyalcatraz
It really is all about techniques and tuning. I'm 5'7", and my former instructor can form chords I'll never be able to in standard tuning. Brian Carroll- a.k.a. Buckethead- is 6'8", and has a similar advantage over most other guitarists...

But unless you're significantly smaller than Kaki King- a petite 5'3"- you should do just fine with standard guitars.


BTW, this is an amazing and encouraging video! Is this the normal way for her to play? Quite different from other guitarist!
#8
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Well, 25.5" is standard scale for Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster style guitars, 24.75 is the standard scale for Gibson Les Paul and SG style guitars, and 24" scale guitars are usually things like the Fender Jaguars.

Thanks very much for your info
#9
She IS something special! That's her fingerstyle technique, which dominates her earlier recordings. She has since gone on to adding electric to her repertoire, and plays in a much more conventional style.

In part due to her size, but primarily to realize her goals as a composer, she works in a wide variety of tunings...sometimes as many as 6 on a single album.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
That sounds so great...and really special. Will try to find some songs from her to listen to

Quote by dannyalcatraz
She IS something special! That's her fingerstyle technique, which dominates her earlier recordings. She has since gone on to adding electric to her repertoire, and plays in a much more conventional style.

In part due to her size, but primarily to realize her goals as a composer, she works in a wide variety of tunings...sometimes as many as 6 on a single album.
#11
For something nice bang for the buck check out if you can find Cort CR250 serie guitar. No experience with that particular model but its metal-oriented brother EVL-Z4, which I have, was worth every penny and I doubt CR is any worse. Also CR250 has a set-neck instead of bolt-on over that one. Should be in your price range.
http://www.cortguitars.com/uk/product/cr250

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#12
Quote by MaaZeus
For something nice bang for the buck check out if you can find Cort CR250 serie guitar. No experience with that particular model but its metal-oriented brother EVL-Z4, which I have, was worth every penny and I doubt CR is any worse. Also CR250 has a set-neck instead of bolt-on over that one. Should be in your price range.
http://www.cortguitars.com/uk/product/cr250

Thanks very much! I will search for them
#13
Yeah i mean it depends on exactly how small your hands are, but for most people practice allows you to stretch more than the size of your hands (within reason, anyway). Someone with smaller hands who's played guitar for years will be able to stretch better than someone with large hands who doesn't play (again, within reason).

Piano will probably help a bit (I played piano before guitar), but practising guitar will make the big difference. You have to contort your hand for guitar which you don't have to do with piano.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#14
Quote by Dave_Mc
Yeah i mean it depends on exactly how small your hands are, but for most people practice allows you to stretch more than the size of your hands (within reason, anyway). Someone with smaller hands who's played guitar for years will be able to stretch better than someone with large hands who doesn't play (again, within reason).

Piano will probably help a bit (I played piano before guitar), but practising guitar will make the big difference. You have to contort your hand for guitar which you don't have to do with piano.


This gives me some hope
#16
Hey, keep playing the piano -- you'll find it builds great strength in your hands that can actually HELP your guitar technique. A lot of guitar players, including a lot of well-known professionals, need to "cheat" on their technique to get around lack of hand strength or (especially with older players) pain from arthritis. These players will use the palm of their hand to pull forearm muscles into the fray, both for bending and vibrato *and* to fret some chords. If you develop the hand strength (and get your guitar set up well enough) to be able to fret notes and chords and to handle vibrato and bending *without* using the palm of your hand on the neck of the guitar, you'll be able to reach a lot more on the fretboard in the long run.

I started on piano at a very early age and the increase in hand strength allows a more classical technique and some pretty good speed.
#17
I like women with small hands.

what?

>____>
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#18
Have you considered buying a standard scale guitar and using a capo at the 2nd fret?
That way you can have more choices in which guitar to buy and when your hands are able to stretch more you can use the same guitar.
Last edited by dalewilliams at Dec 11, 2013,
#19
that's actually a decent idea- maybe combined with 24.75" scale length for the best of both worlds.

as long as you don't need to play along with anyone else. the capo won't work so well in that instance (well, unless you tune down i suppose).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#20
That's a great idea. Tune down and then capo back up, so you get less string tension and a shorter scale length to learn on, then once you've got the basics down you can take the capo off and tune to standard. No new guitar required, but an easier start.

I might have to start suggesting that for kids or smaller adults.
#21
Alright, reality check time. There are those who'll tell you that hand-size doesn't matter and that therefore the guitar-scale doesn't matter, it's just a question of practicing harder.

Frankly, that's rot. There's a reason there's a dozens of neck shapes, widths and lengths and that's because they suit different people.

I was looking for a smallish guitar as I was struggling with a 25.5" Stratocaster style and was told similar stuff - it's not the guitar's fault, it was me. Very disheartening. Anyway, I came across the Fender Mustang model, with a 24" scale and it's made a huge difference to my playing. I love it and it suits those with small hands - LIKE ME.

I would highly recommend trying one in a shop, you might think it's awesome.

Good luck in your quest.

Ash
#22
Quote by AshersUK
Alright, reality check time. There are those who'll tell you that hand-size doesn't matter and that therefore the guitar-scale doesn't matter, it's just a question of practicing harder.

Frankly, that's rot. There's a reason there's a dozens of neck shapes, widths and lengths and that's because they suit different people.

I was looking for a smallish guitar as I was struggling with a 25.5" Stratocaster style and was told similar stuff - it's not the guitar's fault, it was me. Very disheartening. Anyway, I came across the Fender Mustang model, with a 24" scale and it's made a huge difference to my playing. I love it and it suits those with small hands - LIKE ME.

I would highly recommend trying one in a shop, you might think it's awesome.

Good luck in your quest.

Ash


good shout, although make sure you try loads of stuff out. My jaguar has a short scale, nice low radius fretboard but the neck itsself is actually quite chunky.

bottom line: shop around!
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#23
I have had a couple Mikro's and just bought a new one a month ago , they don't sound bad for 140.00 new , nice little guitar for the money and they sound fine with my amps
#24
Quote by Roc8995
That's a great idea. Tune down and then capo back up, so you get less string tension and a shorter scale length to learn on, then once you've got the basics down you can take the capo off and tune to standard. No new guitar required, but an easier start.

I might have to start suggesting that for kids or smaller adults.


yeah

Quote by AshersUK
Alright, reality check time. There are those who'll tell you that hand-size doesn't matter and that therefore the guitar-scale doesn't matter, it's just a question of practicing harder.

Frankly, that's rot. There's a reason there's a dozens of neck shapes, widths and lengths and that's because they suit different people.

I was looking for a smallish guitar as I was struggling with a 25.5" Stratocaster style and was told similar stuff - it's not the guitar's fault, it was me. Very disheartening. Anyway, I came across the Fender Mustang model, with a 24" scale and it's made a huge difference to my playing. I love it and it suits those with small hands - LIKE ME.

I would highly recommend trying one in a shop, you might think it's awesome.

Good luck in your quest.

Ash


Yeah absolutely, if you feel it makes a difference that's your prerogative. and it's worth trying out your options just in case. In my defence, I did say "within reason".

I'd also say that it is partly (not wholly, but partly) to do with practise and what you're used to, too. I got a bass recently after playing only guitar for years, and suddenly my guitar neck feels tiny.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Scale length may be one factor but a minor one. Scale length is from bridge to nut. If you take 1/2 that measurement, that's the distance to the 12 fret. 3/8 of an inch across the 12 frets (Gibson to Fender) actually equates to a very small difference across the frets you'll normally span while playing.
I'd look more at neck size/profile. A slimmer neck may be more comfortable for you as well.
Moving on.....
#26
Check out a Fender Jaguar with humbuckers. Short scale, thick sound. Best of both worlds!
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#27
I had a white Daisy Rock Artist for a while. That guitar actually had some great tones in it between the Duncan design hb and the lipstick single coil. I actually ended up giving it away though because it was a little TOO small in neck size for my hand and I'd fatigue quickly playing it. I bought it as a gag because of the looks, but if they're still making guitars, the daisy rocks were specifically designed to have smaller, slimmer necks. Some of the designs were, erm... cheesy, to be kind, but they were aiming at this sort of niche.

I'm on the fence about whether it's a good approach for a beginner though. The neck can't be so uncomfortable that good playing is unattainable or discourages one from practicing, but I think that too easy a neck to play may spoil your hand to anything else and make playing another guitar more challenging. But it's probably more important at this stage to go with something that will keep your interest levels up.
#28
One of the greatest short-scale guitars ever made: the Brian May Special, only 24"
http://www.brianmayguitars.co.uk/bm-special.html

Durango Guitars also makes 24"ers
http://durangoguitarworks.com/index.html
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Dec 12, 2013,
#29
Quote by Hydra26
But it's probably more important at this stage to go with something that will keep your interest levels up.


Yep I suspect so- that's normally my philosophy, anyway.

I probably wouldn't bother with a children's guitar- but going shorter scale length would likely help (along with a slimmer neck, and maybe even a narrower nut width).

It wouldn't hurt to try guitars with different scale lengths, though, just to see- you won't know how much difference it makes until you try.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#30
Quote by KenG
I'd look more at neck size/profile. A slimmer neck may be more comfortable for you as well.

I second this. I'm also a girl with small hands, and my current guitar has a 25.5 scale, but the LTD Extra Thin U neck they put on their M series. It replaced a Schecter with a 24.75 scale but a baseball bat for a neck, and I was a little hesitant until I actually tried it out, but actually found it's easier to get my hands around the slimmer neck.
#31
Quote by Blackfire.
What kind of music do you want to play?

some metal, some jazz...no restriction on this side.
#32
Quote by AshersUK
Alright, reality check time. There are those who'll tell you that hand-size doesn't matter and that therefore the guitar-scale doesn't matter, it's just a question of practicing harder.

Frankly, that's rot. There's a reason there's a dozens of neck shapes, widths and lengths and that's because they suit different people.

I was looking for a smallish guitar as I was struggling with a 25.5" Stratocaster style and was told similar stuff - it's not the guitar's fault, it was me. Very disheartening. Anyway, I came across the Fender Mustang model, with a 24" scale and it's made a huge difference to my playing. I love it and it suits those with small hands - LIKE ME.

I would highly recommend trying one in a shop, you might think it's awesome.

Good luck in your quest.

Ash

Thanks very much for your reply. I will try some mustang in store...
#33
Quote by Sid McCall
Check out a Fender Jaguar with humbuckers. Short scale, thick sound. Best of both worlds!

thanks for recommendation
#34
Quote by Sally Paradise
I second this. I'm also a girl with small hands, and my current guitar has a 25.5 scale, but the LTD Extra Thin U neck they put on their M series. It replaced a Schecter with a 24.75 scale but a baseball bat for a neck, and I was a little hesitant until I actually tried it out, but actually found it's easier to get my hands around the slimmer neck.

Mmm, sounds quite reasonable.
#35
Quote by Hydra26
I had a white Daisy Rock Artist for a while. That guitar actually had some great tones in it between the Duncan design hb and the lipstick single coil. I actually ended up giving it away though because it was a little TOO small in neck size for my hand and I'd fatigue quickly playing it. I bought it as a gag because of the looks, but if they're still making guitars, the daisy rocks were specifically designed to have smaller, slimmer necks. Some of the designs were, erm... cheesy, to be kind, but they were aiming at this sort of niche.

I'm on the fence about whether it's a good approach for a beginner though. The neck can't be so uncomfortable that good playing is unattainable or discourages one from practicing, but I think that too easy a neck to play may spoil your hand to anything else and make playing another guitar more challenging. But it's probably more important at this stage to go with something that will keep your interest levels up.


good thought...though I guess in the beginning I want to try from easy side?
#36
Quote by dspellman
Hey, keep playing the piano -- you'll find it builds great strength in your hands that can actually HELP your guitar technique. A lot of guitar players, including a lot of well-known professionals, need to "cheat" on their technique to get around lack of hand strength or (especially with older players) pain from arthritis. These players will use the palm of their hand to pull forearm muscles into the fray, both for bending and vibrato *and* to fret some chords. If you develop the hand strength (and get your guitar set up well enough) to be able to fret notes and chords and to handle vibrato and bending *without* using the palm of your hand on the neck of the guitar, you'll be able to reach a lot more on the fretboard in the long run.

I started on piano at a very early age and the increase in hand strength allows a more classical technique and some pretty good speed.


Very true...I am learning bending and vibrato recently, and found that it's hard to get to the right position with only fingers....
#37
yeah use the thumb round the neck approach for bending and (rock-style) vibrato. it's way easier.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#38
Quote by Angelily
some metal, some jazz...no restriction on this side.

Well, I'll reiterate the suggestion of the Brian May Special for everything short of metal, and for metal, I'll suggest this:

http://www.fernandesguitarshop.com/standard/76-dragonfly-standard.html

The Fernandes Dragonfly- as well as other Fernandes models in general- is aimed at the hard-rock & metal genre players. Pickups tend towards the hot side, the necks are slender.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#39
I'm a small guitarist, 5'3 male and will never be taller. Have tiny hands. I found PRS SE singlecuts to be a perfect fit in my hands and to match my frame. Try one out at your local shop and see if it's a good fit for you in terms of sound and feel.
Page 1 of 2