#1
I was reading a music theory article on here and I came across this sentence;

'The A Major scale: A, B, C sharp, D, E, F sharp, G'

I thought the A major scale/key also has a G sharp?
Wouldn't the above scale be A mixalydian (major mode) within the key of D? Or was the author just discussing one of the major scales, not necessarily the ionian (1st major scale within a key)? Sorry, I haven't quite fully come to grasp with theory, as you can tell.
#2
Yes, A major scale also has a G sharp. I guess it was just a typo.

And no, A mixolydian is not in the key of D. If you are in the key of D and play those notes, you are playing the D major scale. A mixolydian resolves to A - it's the same notes as D major scale but the root note is A. Same as B minor is not in the key of D major. B minor scale has the same notes as D major scale but what separates them is the tonic, the root note.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#3
A mixolydian is in the key of D... mixolydian scales are built off the V, so if you were to play the scale A B C# D E F# G, that would be a dominant scale in the key of D. You're right, OP

How do you interpret that as a D major scale, MaggaraMarine?
Last edited by chronic_stp at Dec 11, 2013,
#4
I believe what he meant is that it is the mode of A Mixolydian, which contains the same notes as the D major scale. I don't think anyone is really wrong here, we just understand things in different terms, especially when it comes to modes.
#5
Quote by chronic_stp
A mixolydian is in the key of D... mixolydian scales are built off the V, so if you were to play the scale A B C# D E F# G, that would be a dominant scale in the key of D. You're right, OP

How do you interpret that as a D major scale, MaggaraMarine?

Because, if you're in the key of D major, the scale used doesn't change the key. Playing A, B, C#, D, E, F#, & G and calling it "A mixolydian" (which is a mode, not a key) is wrong. It's the D major scale, because the key is D major. I could also play a scale based off of a mix of diatonic and non-diatonic notes (note that A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G is diatonic in the key of D major) still be within the key of D major. You don't say it's in "X scale", when the key is clearly defined. Keys > scales.

I think you're falling into the trap of believing that modes and keys can be used in the same or similar contexts. In reality, modes and keys are two different realms. See here and here and finally here. (That last link is a 5 part article. Read all 5 articles.)

Quote by evanstark
I believe what he meant is that it is the mode of A Mixolydian, which contains the same notes as the D major scale. I don't think anyone is really wrong here, we just understand things in different terms, especially when it comes to modes.

Modes are much stricter than keys. When in the A mixolydian mode, I can only play the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F#, & G. I cannot play chords that don't contain those notes, and I cannot play accidentals. I can, of course, switch modes; but I cannot be playing a modal piece/song if I don't stick strictly to modes.
Conversely, if I'm in the key of Dmajor, I can play whatever notes/chords/tone clusters I want, as long as D major remains the tonic chord. (If D major ceases to be the tonic, I obviously change keys.) I'm not as limited, in that respect. Of course, I still want to be as conservative in note and chord choices to a degree, because I want to play what the song calls for (and I probably want it to sound good). There's a reason that very few songwriters or composers use modes extensively.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Dec 11, 2013,
#6
Quote by crazysam23_Atax

Modes are much stricter than keys. When in the A mixolydian mode, I can only play the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F#, & G. I cannot play chords that don't contain those notes, and I cannot play accidentals. I can, of course, switch modes; but I cannot be playing a modal piece/song if I don't stick strictly to modes.

That's not true. The mode is determined by the notes that make up the tonal character of a piece of music. You can still use passing notes and ornamentations that are non diatonic. You could be using Phrygian and the b2 could contribute significantly to the tonal character of the piece and when going to a b3 you might use the major second as a passing note. The brief appearance of the major second as a passing tone would not be considered to alter the tonal character, it's still Phrygian.
Si
#7
Quote by chronic_stp
A mixolydian is in the key of D... mixolydian scales are built off the V, so if you were to play the scale A B C# D E F# G, that would be a dominant scale in the key of D. You're right, OP

How do you interpret that as a D major scale, MaggaraMarine?

So you are saying that B minor is in the key of D?

And how is that a D major scale? Well, play it over a D major chord. What does it sound like?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 12, 2013,
#8
I knew this would start a debate on the understanding of modes. There can never just be a straightforward answer, damn haha. Anyway, the way my teacher taught me, if you're playing a chord progression such as cmaj d minor gmaj and cmaj, you're in c ionian, also known as c major. Whereas if youre playing d minor gmaj a minor d minor, then you're in d dorian. Same notes as c major, but the 'pull' is stronger towards d minor, for lack of better words. And if you're playing c major e minor g major f major, then you are most likely to be playing in c major, however it depends on the rest of the music, it's a lot to do with listening, which chord sounds the strongest in a piece of music. As to the above post, what I think he is referring to is that B minor is the relative minor of b major, also sometimes called b aeolian. Correct me if you think im wrong, just dont be a dick about it :P
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
That's not true. The mode is determined by the notes that make up the tonal character of a piece of music. You can still use passing notes and ornamentations that are non diatonic. You could be using Phrygian and the b2 could contribute significantly to the tonal character of the piece and when going to a b3 you might use the major second as a passing note. The brief appearance of the major second as a passing tone would not be considered to alter the tonal character, it's still Phrygian.


That's what I'd have thought (though I'm well aware that sometimes there are technical definitions which are immovable ). I mean if I'm playing in a major or minor scale and throw in an accidental very occasionally it doesn't change the key/scale, why would it in the case of a mode?
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#10
Quote by mickel_w
I knew this would start a debate on the understanding of modes. There can never just be a straightforward answer, damn haha. Anyway, the way my teacher taught me, if you're playing a chord progression such as cmaj d minor gmaj and cmaj, you're in c ionian, also known as c major. Whereas if youre playing d minor gmaj a minor d minor, then you're in d dorian. Same notes as c major, but the 'pull' is stronger towards d minor, for lack of better words. And if you're playing c major e minor g major f major, then you are most likely to be playing in c major, however it depends on the rest of the music, it's a lot to do with listening, which chord sounds the strongest in a piece of music. As to the above post, what I think he is referring to is that B minor is the relative minor of b major, also sometimes called b aeolian. Correct me if you think im wrong, just dont be a dick about it :P

I asked my question because B minor scale is actually a mode of D major scale. And he said A mixolydian - a mode of D major - is in the key of D major. So if A mixolydian is in the key of D major, then B minor is also in the key of D major. But that's not true. B minor is in B minor. A mixolydian uses the same notes as D major, but just like B minor, it has a different tonic. A mixolydian resolves to A, B minor resolves to B.

But if you play the B minor or A mixolydian scale or whatever over a progression in D major, it's all the same scale - D major. Why? Just listen to it. Where does it resolve to? It resolves to D. So it's all in D. You really can't make D major progression sound like B minor. Playing B minor scale over D major sounds exactly the same as playing D major over D major. That's because they have exactly the same notes. The order of notes doesn't matter.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Hartke HyDrive 210c
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Yamaha P115
#11
I'm going to tread lightly in the world of modes. Based off of the Guitar Grimoire Scales and Modes an F Major or Ionian is the same scale pattern as a G Dorian is the same scale pattern as an A Phyrigian as a Bb Lydian as a C Myxolydian as D Aeiolian (which is the relative natural minor) and as an E Locrian.

Here's the kicker...by playing all those modes I'm actually just playing F Major or Ionian. In fact, I can and will go the other direction.

When I play an F Ionian I play the Major, when I play the F Dorian I'm really playing Eb Major Key Ionian, when I play the F Phrygian I am really playing the the D Major Ionian Key. I can keep going but I think more people need to buy the Guitar Grimoire and study it.

So then what does that tell about Scales, Modes and Keys? To me it's all the same thing.
#12
Quote by antics32
I'm going to tread lightly in the world of modes. Based off of the Guitar Grimoire Scales and Modes an F Major or Ionian is the same scale pattern as a G Dorian is the same scale pattern as an A Phyrigian as a Bb Lydian as a C Myxolydian as D Aeiolian (which is the relative natural minor) and as an E Locrian.

Here's the kicker...by playing all those modes I'm actually just playing F Major or Ionian. In fact, I can and will go the other direction.

When I play an F Ionian I play the Major, when I play the F Dorian I'm really playing Eb Major Key Ionian, when I play the F Phrygian I am really playing the the D Major Ionian Key. I can keep going but I think more people need to buy the Guitar Grimoire and study it.

So then what does that tell about Scales, Modes and Keys? To me it's all the same thing.

No. When you are playing in D dorian, you are not playing in C major. They sound different even though the notes are the same. Again, it is all about where everything resolves to.

That's what separates major and minor keys. When you play A minor scale, you are not playing the C major scale. They sound different, even though they are the same notes. You actually can't even play the A minor scale over a C major progression because playing the notes in A minor over C major is the same as playing the notes of C major over C major (because the scales have the same notes). The notes get a different function when they are played over different chords.

For example play a C note over F-Bb-C-F progression. Then play it over C-F-G-C. And then over Am-Dm-Em-Am. It sounds different in all cases. Why? Because the backing track gives the note a different function. The first progression is in F major so C functions as the fifth - it sounds the same as G note in the key of C major. In the second progression C is the tonic and in the third progression C functions as the third because it's in A minor.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 12, 2013,
#13
Quote by MaggaraMarine
No. When you are playing in D dorian, you are not playing in C major. They sound different even though the notes are the same. Again, it is all about where everything resolves to.

That's what separates major and minor keys. When you play A minor scale, you are not playing the C major scale. They sound different, even though they are the same notes. You actually can't even play the A minor scale over a C major progression because playing the notes in A minor over C major is the same as playing the notes of C major over C major (because the scales have the same notes). The notes get a different function when they are played over different chords.

For example play a C note over F-Bb-C-F progression. Then play it over C-F-G-C. And then over Am-Dm-Em-Am. It sounds different in all cases. Why? Because the backing track gives the note a different function. The first progression is in F major so C functions as the fifth - it sounds the same as G note in the key of C major. In the second progression C is the tonic and in the third progression C functions as the third because it's in A minor.


Look, you know far more than I do and I'm learning quite a bit from this thread...but...here comes the but...when you take D dorian and compare it to C major my perspective is that you are correct you resolve at a different spot...but same scale. The C will start at C the Dorian will start at D but same scale.

Now, I do have modal practice track music. Fine. I'll admit that. Does it sound different than the regular Major, Minor stuff. Sure. My response is just as you harmonize the C and resolve at C so you harmonize the D and resolve at D. The triads are constructed the same...just shifted. So, I'm pretty sure I can play the C major over a D Dorian practice track without a difference. I can do it and post it on Sound Cloud if you like.

Now, I have a lot to learn about harmonizing chords and things of that nature. I plan to read, "How to Write Songs for Guitar." Keep in mind though when I do read it my thinking is always going to be how do I generalize this and make it my own. Instead of, this is the rule and I have to live by it. So for me Scale and Mode are interchangeable terms. Maybe Key is too broad at this point.

Thanks for your input.
#14
Quote by antics32
Look, you know far more than I do and I'm learning quite a bit from this thread...but...here comes the but...when you take D dorian and compare it to C major my perspective is that you are correct you resolve at a different spot...but same scale. The C will start at C the Dorian will start at D but same scale.

Now, I do have modal practice track music. Fine. I'll admit that. Does it sound different than the regular Major, Minor stuff. Sure. My response is just as you harmonize the C and resolve at C so you harmonize the D and resolve at D. The triads are constructed the same...just shifted. So, I'm pretty sure I can play the C major over a D Dorian practice track without a difference. I can do it and post it on Sound Cloud if you like.

Now, I have a lot to learn about harmonizing chords and things of that nature. I plan to read, "How to Write Songs for Guitar." Keep in mind though when I do read it my thinking is always going to be how do I generalize this and make it my own. Instead of, this is the rule and I have to live by it. So for me Scale and Mode are interchangeable terms. Maybe Key is too broad at this point.

Thanks for your input.



I think magga's point is in that sentence, you can play that scale over that backing, and the notes will all sound ok, but its important to remember that the C note, will no longer be the important note, its function is entirely changed. If you just need to remeber that D dorian is in the key of C, thats fine, but Dminor is now the tonic chord, and playing a C over it, will sound ... strange. yes? Writing a melody for C Ionian backing track, wont work for D dorian, even though they have the same notes.
#15
Quote by 20Tigers
That's not true. The mode is determined by the notes that make up the tonal character of a piece of music. You can still use passing notes and ornamentations that are non diatonic. You could be using Phrygian and the b2 could contribute significantly to the tonal character of the piece and when going to a b3 you might use the major second as a passing note. The brief appearance of the major second as a passing tone would not be considered to alter the tonal character, it's still Phrygian.
True. I stated it badly. Sorry.

I guess I was just trying to stress that modes, in general, tend to be more rigid than keys.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
But if you play the B minor or A mixolydian scale or whatever over a progression in D major, it's all the same scale - D major. Why? Just listen to it. Where does it resolve to? It resolves to D. So it's all in D. You really can't make D major progression sound like B minor. Playing B minor scale over D major sounds exactly the same as playing D major over D major. That's because they have exactly the same notes. The order of notes doesn't matter.

Mhmmm. Unfortunately, it's one of the misconceptions that starting on, for instance, B and playing "B minor" somehow changes how it would sound. A lot of the misunderstanding of modes comes from this idea.
#16
Quote by antics32
I'm going to tread lightly in the world of modes. Based off of the Guitar Grimoire Scales and Modes an F Major or Ionian is the same scale pattern as a G Dorian is the same scale pattern as an A Phyrigian as a Bb Lydian as a C Myxolydian as D Aeiolian (which is the relative natural minor) and as an E Locrian.

Here's the kicker...by playing all those modes I'm actually just playing F Major or Ionian. In fact, I can and will go the other direction.

When I play an F Ionian I play the Major, when I play the F Dorian I'm really playing Eb Major Key Ionian, when I play the F Phrygian I am really playing the the D Major Ionian Key. I can keep going but I think more people need to buy the Guitar Grimoire and study it.

So then what does that tell about Scales, Modes and Keys? To me it's all the same thing.

You have recognized what is known as "relative" scales. They are related because they contain the same notes but they are not the same.

Take a song in Am. It is not in C. Often though a song in Am will have a key change to C major. A song in Am is not really in C major, and the same applies to your reasoning.

Relative modes and scales might share the same notes but they are very different.

For example take F Phrygian and D major.
F Phrygian has a minor second while D major has a major second.
F Phrygian has a minor third while D major has a major third.
Both have a perfect fourth and perfect fifth.
F Phrygian has a minor sixth while D major has a major sixth
F Phrygian has a minor seventh while D major has a major seventh.

As you can see there is quite a lot of difference between F Phrygian and D Major. Further the tonal centre of F Phrygian is F while the tonal centre of D major is D.

These are very different. Yes they have the same notes but you can think of that as a bit of a coincidence. The structures are completely different and so too is the tonal centre.
Si
#17
Quote by blunderwonder
I think magga's point is in that sentence, you can play that scale over that backing, and the notes will all sound ok, but its important to remember that the C note, will no longer be the important note, its function is entirely changed. If you just need to remeber that D dorian is in the key of C, thats fine, but Dminor is now the tonic chord, and playing a C over it, will sound ... strange. yes? Writing a melody for C Ionian backing track, wont work for D dorian, even though they have the same notes.

Yes, exactly my point.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
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#18
I think the confusion here comes from the casual writing we all use on the internet, which has, unfortunately, facilitated some misunderstanding.

Scales like G major and D mixolydian may well share the same notes, and thus the same patterns on the fretboard, but they are NOT the same sacle.

This is because a scale is not just the notes. It is, essentially, the musical function of those notes. We hear music in a context and that context gives each scale degree its own "color" as it were. In G major, D sounds like a fifth. So long as the context is G major, D will always sound like a fifth, the way someone in a red dress stands out in a sea of people wearing blue.

In D mixolydian, however, D no longer sounds like a fifth. It sounds like a tonic.

In the new context, every note has a new "color." Same notes, but a different scale.

This is part of why it is crucial to get away from shape-based playing. Thinking in shapes, rather than sounds, encourages you to ignore these differences.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Dec 13, 2013,
#19
Quote by HotspurJr

This is part of why it is crucial to get away from shape-based playing. Thinking in shapes, rather than sounds, encourages you to ignore these differences.


Fine, as far as I know I'm the one on here who thinks in shapes...so, I'm going to man up and post it on sound cloud. I have modal practice track music which I never use. I'll strictly use the patterns or shapes of the major and see what results.
#20
Quote by antics32
Fine, as far as I know I'm the one on here who thinks in shapes...so, I'm going to man up and post it on sound cloud. I have modal practice track music which I never use. I'll strictly use the patterns or shapes of the major and see what results.


This is an E Phryigian Practice Track using the C Major. I know the C Major by heart. This is the sound that ensues...

https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/e-phrygian-exercise-with-c
#21
Well... Now i have a question, and its going to make me look bad... As i usually play from chord sheets, or tab, or lately very badly by ear.

When a song is written in the key of Am, does the key signature look the same as Cmaj? I mean if it were written on sheet music for an orchestra or piano or something cmaj has no b's or #'s. How do they notate the difference on sheet music - or is there no need to indicate it, because the song/chords are supposed to bear it out anyway?
#22
Quote by blunderwonder
Well... Now i have a question, and its going to make me look bad... As i usually play from chord sheets, or tab, or lately very badly by ear.

When a song is written in the key of Am, does the key signature look the same as Cmaj? I mean if it were written on sheet music for an orchestra or piano or something cmaj has no b's or #'s. How do they notate the difference on sheet music - or is there no need to indicate it, because the song/chords are supposed to bear it out anyway?

Well...as you say, neither A minor or C major have any sharps or flats. Pianists know the difference because they have learned to recognize which chord is the tonic (read: the "home" chord). Play the following: Emaj, Amaj, Bmaj. Use any strumming pattern you like. Which chord feels the most comfortable? It should be Emaj. Pianists (and just about any other musician should also) learn to recognize more complex examples.
#23
Quote by crazysam23_Atax

Modes are much stricter than keys. When in the A mixolydian mode, I can only play the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F#, & G. I cannot play chords that don't contain those notes, and I cannot play accidentals. I can, of course, switch modes; but I cannot be playing a modal piece/song if I don't stick strictly to modes.
Conversely, if I'm in the key of Dmajor, I can play whatever notes/chords/tone clusters I want, as long as D major remains the tonic chord. (If D major ceases to be the tonic, I obviously change keys.) I'm not as limited, in that respect. Of course, I still want to be as conservative in note and chord choices to a degree, because I want to play what the song calls for (and I probably want it to sound good). There's a reason that very few songwriters or composers use modes extensively.


I'm not sure if you actually have any idea what you're talking about. There are no "strict limits" You can use modes freely the same way as you use any other scale. You can also play any accidentals as passing tones if you like.

The best way in my opinion is to think of modes as modifications to major and minor.

For playing "modal" you're not required to ONLY use the notes of the mode, but if you want to have the characteristic sound of the mode, you should at least use the note that differs from the major/minor scale and is unique to that mode. For example if you want to play in C lydian, you will want to use F# to have that Lydian sound. Nothing stops you from going outside that mode, though and use passing notes, secondary dominants, etc. I don't understand where you got that from.

Lol this is actually hilarious. If you really obey these "modal rules" of yours, you're severely limiting your songwriting.

EDIT: apparently someone already explained this, but whatever.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 13, 2013,
#24
Quote by Elintasokas
I'm not sure if you actually have any idea what you're talking about. There are no "strict limits" You can use modes freely the same way as you use any other scale. You can also play any accidentals as passing tones if you like.

The best way in my opinion is to think of modes as modifications to major and minor.

For playing "modal" you're not required to ONLY use the notes of the mode, but if you want to have the characteristic sound of the mode, you should at least use the note that differs from the major/minor scale and is unique to that mode. For example if you want to play in C lydian, you will want to use F# to have that Lydian sound. Nothing stops you from going outside that mode, though and use passing notes, secondary dominants, etc. I don't understand where you got that from.

Lol this is actually hilarious. If you really obey these "modal rules" of yours, you're severely limiting your songwriting.

EDIT: apparently someone already explained this, but whatever.

But then your music isn't modal any more - it becomes tonal music. Using accidentals in your music doesn't make it modal.

For example many AC/DC songs use a chord progression like bVII-IV-I. But that doesn't mean their songs are modal ("in mixolydian" - they are usually in major but use accidentals, the b7 accidental is very common in rock music). They just use accidentals.

And crazysam was incorrect when he said that modal music can't use any accidentals because it can. But when you start using too many accidentals, the modal sound disappears and it starts to sound tonal.

And it doesn't limit your sognwriting because why would you decide to write/not to write a modal song? I don't care what key my songs are in. I care about how they sound like. If they are or aren't modal, who cares? It's just a fact that the "modal sound" disappears when you start using lots of accidentals.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 13, 2013,
#25
Quote by MaggaraMarine
But then your music isn't modal any more - it becomes tonal music. Using accidentals in your music doesn't make it modal.

For example many AC/DC songs use a chord progression like bVII-IV-I. But that doesn't mean their songs are modal ("in mixolydian" - they are usually in major but use accidentals, the b7 accidental is very common in rock music). They just use accidentals.

And crazysam was incorrect when he said that modal music can't use any accidentals because it can. But when you start using too many accidentals, the modal sound disappears and it starts to sound tonal.

And it doesn't limit your sognwriting because why would you decide to write/not to write a modal song? I don't care what key my songs are in. I care about how they sound like. If they are or aren't modal, who cares? It's just a fact that the "modal sound" disappears when you start using lots of accidentals.


Well, obviously if you play outside the scale all the time you will lose the sound, but that's self explanatory. As long as you MOSTLY stay inside the scale it won't go anywhere.
#26
Quote by antics32
This is an E Phryigian Practice Track using the C Major. I know the C Major by heart. This is the sound that ensues...

https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/e-phrygian-exercise-with-c


I'm not sure what your point is.

It's clearly E phrygian - it's E, minor, and there's a lot of emphasis on the flat 2. And you've got some decent skills, so it has that going for it.

But, um ... it's also aimless and a-melodic. This is exactly, in my opinion, the sort of ceiling people hit when they're too focusing on shapes. You've got a vibe here, sure, but you don't have a melody or a song.
#27
Quote by HotspurJr
I'm not sure what your point is.

It's clearly E phrygian - it's E, minor, and there's a lot of emphasis on the flat 2. And you've got some decent skills, so it has that going for it.

But, um ... it's also aimless and a-melodic. This is exactly, in my opinion, the sort of ceiling people hit when they're too focusing on shapes. You've got a vibe here, sure, but you don't have a melody or a song.

I agree. It sounded like aimless noodling around with the scale. It didn't really sound like you were using your ears and knowing what you want to play. And by using your ears I mean that you hear sounds in your head that you want to play. You don't just play random notes in the scale, you know what you are after - that's playing by ear.

I would suggest using more rests. It makes the solo feel like it's saying something - it gives more meaning to the notes you are playing. Now it's just notes after notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#28
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I agree. It sounded like aimless noodling around with the scale. It didn't really sound like you were using your ears and knowing what you want to play. And by using your ears I mean that you hear sounds in your head that you want to play. You don't just play random notes in the scale, you know what you are after - that's playing by ear.

I would suggest using more rests. It makes the solo feel like it's saying something - it gives more meaning to the notes you are playing. Now it's just notes after notes.


Thanks for the feedback! I really appreciate it. I was just noodling.

Based on another post I'm writing a song on Sibelius. I'm going to call it Metal Pop in the Key of E or something like that. My girlfriend likes metal and I don't like pop so this is a spoof. It's in my head though and I'm working on putting it on paper. I'll post it when it's done. This is going to be my first attempt at writing a structured song. I'll print it out, play it on the guitar edit it and post it. I think it less than two minutes in length.

Thanks for the feedback again.
#29
Quote by antics32
Thanks for the feedback! I really appreciate it. I was just noodling.

Based on another post I'm writing a song on Sibelius. I'm going to call it Metal Pop in the Key of E or something like that. My girlfriend likes metal and I don't like pop so this is a spoof. It's in my head though and I'm working on putting it on paper. I'll post it when it's done. This is going to be my first attempt at writing a structured song. I'll print it out, play it on the guitar edit it and post it. I think it less than two minutes in length.

Thanks for the feedback again.

If you want to post your songs in UG and get some feedback, I would suggest posting in the recordings -> original recordings forum. https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=51
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#30
Quote by MaggaraMarine
And crazysam was incorrect when he said that modal music can't use any accidentals because it can. But when you start using too many accidentals, the modal sound disappears and it starts to sound tonal.

I already was called out on that and conceded it. But my main point was the bolded; I just didn't state it well.
#31
Quote by chronic_stp
A mixolydian is in the key of D... mixolydian scales are built off the V, so if you were to play the scale A B C# D E F# G, that would be a dominant scale in the key of D. You're right, OP

How do you interpret that as a D major scale, MaggaraMarine?

no