#1
The music i write never seems good enough! Ecspecially the vocal melodies. I want to write a genuinely good song that people would want to listen to, but anytime i sit down and try to write something i can never get it to sound like it does in my head. Or even express how im feeling. It all sounds so generic and ripped off. An even if i come up with something i like, ill end up hating it a day later. Also, all my vocal melodies are starting to sound the same... I think im running out of ideas guys.
Im just so frustrated!!
I want to come up with my own style, something new and original but having trouble with that too.
#4
You shouldn't try to come up with your style. You are your style. If you are trying to be something else than you are, you are not writing in your style.

You are being too self critical. You can't write something that doesn't sound like something else. Everything you write is influenced by music you listen to. Not all influences are obvious of course but still, your song will always kind of remind of something else. Same chords, instruments, rhythms and same kind of melodies are used in other songs. It's just impossible to be completely original. Even bands that started new genres sounded like bands before them. For example Black Sabbath was one of the first metal bands but they also had clear blues influences in their music. It wasn't so different from other music - yes, it was heavier, but you could still hear the similarity between Black Sabbath and many blues bands. Music is like evolution. Something new just doesn't happen - it needs some developing first.

You said you can't get it sound like what you hear in your head. I think you just need some ear training.

Remember that not every song is a masterpiece and not every song is worth to be released on an album. Just write music.

Listen to lots of music, not just one band or one genre. That way you get more influences.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
Good. It's better to be a musician that thinks most of their ideas are bad than a musician who thinks most of their ideas are good, it means you have standards. I compose professionally, and one thing that has really helped my songwriting is thinking my way through the song. A lot of musicians think it 'false' because I don't 'feel the music', but it's an effective approach. For instance, when I'm writing a song for my band, I'm always thinking 'Have I done this on this CD yet? If I have, what can I do differently?'. That way, I make sure that the songs have different feels, the melodies move in different ways and they don't sound the same.

You also say you want to express yourself, but what do you want to express? More importantly, is what you have worth expressing? If not, what is? You don't have to express yourself to make the audience feel something, for instance, Abandoned by Kamelot is an incredibly emotional song, but they didn't write it because they felt abandoned. They wrote it because it's part of the story, and the singer performed it with utter conviction, and it was well composed. Try and make your priority writing a good song, not self expression, many unsigned bands become dull and masturbatory because they refuse to write for someone other than themselves.

As for being original, is that possible? Music has been around for hundreds of years, in a standard pop song, there are generally seven notes being used if there isn't a key change, and even still, there are only 11 notes in existence, so are you really going to write something original? It depends on what your definition of the word 'original' is. If you want to create something brand new, you can't, it's impossible, even the musicians that seemed revolutionary were clearly influenced by something beforehand, but it's the combinations of influences that make you stand out.

For me, when I write for my band, it's a mishmash of Nightwish, Dragonforce, Kamelot and whatever musical I'm currently addicted to, with some of whatever I've just listened to sprinkled about, and that's pretty original, it's pretty clear what I've ripped off and taken ideas from, but you probably won't find another band who use those influences in the way I might, and that's where your originality will come from. Ways in which you will utilise your influences, don't worry about ripping things off, unless it's a really famous song, and don't be afraid to borrow ideas. When we learn guitar, we study our idols to find out how we can improve, when we learn to compose, we study our idols to see how we can improve. There's nothing wrong with taking structural ideas, chord progressions, or ideas from melodies.
#6
It's hard to not find flaws in every song you write but if you write a generally good song wich lives up to your standards but have like one flaw in it, i say take it for the good parts and either try to iron out the flaw or ignore it.

When it comes to your own style and orginality, like celestialguitar said, nothing is new in music and one thing that is hard to do i think is to accept your own playstyle but you can always learn more ( that might sound fussy as hell )

Own example, My influences are bands like GnR, ac/dc, mötley crue and stuff like that but my own playstyle wich is first didnt accepted are way more punky ( maby not GnR in some songs ) but since i have accepted that i have also learned how to add more rythm and evolved as a guitarplayer.

Sorry if this sounds fussy and for the spelling mistakes but i am very tired atm.

Love, Syobdaed.
#7
I've always heard that it's good to write music for five years, throw everything out and then start fresh (I forget where I heard that, but it's good advice).

I agree with CelestialGuitar though. It's better to think your stuff is bad than to be overly optimistic about everything you write. I know that guys like Billy Corgan and John Mayer are like that. Especially Mayer. Apparently, he hates just about everything he plays and while he's not the nicest guy, he's an extremely successful guitar player and songwriter.

Keep it up. You'll get some good stuff on paper.

On a more practical note, maybe try and listen to some different types of music? I don't know if you've done this, but listening to the same stuff all the time can cause your ear to become a little biased. Mix it up and that could help your songwriting over time.
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#8
Quote by robertwilliam9
I've always heard that it's good to write music for five years, throw everything out and then start fresh (I forget where I heard that, but it's good advice).

I agree with CelestialGuitar though. It's better to think your stuff is bad than to be overly optimistic about everything you write. I know that guys like Billy Corgan and John Mayer are like that. Especially Mayer. Apparently, he hates just about everything he plays and while he's not the nicest guy, he's an extremely successful guitar player and songwriter.

Keep it up. You'll get some good stuff on paper.

On a more practical note, maybe try and listen to some different types of music? I don't know if you've done this, but listening to the same stuff all the time can cause your ear to become a little biased. Mix it up and that could help your songwriting over time.

When I finish a song, I am usually happy with it. But there are song ideas I haven't finished that I'm not really happy with. But I think if I finished them, I would be happy with them. You can always improve your songs. Not every part of the song needs to be amazing when you come up with it. It just needs to have the flow. You can always make parts sound better.

I don't think it's good to hate everything you play. Because if you hate it, you may think everybody will hate it and never even publish the music, even though it could be the next hit. It also makes it harder to finish songs because you think every idea you get is crap. Also, I don't agree with "write songs for five years and thrown everything away". I mean, why would you do that? If I write songs for my band, why would I throw my songs away? I have written songs that are for me (and I'm not going to use them anywhere) but we also play many of the songs with my band. You can write good songs right away. But writing good songs becomes easier once you have written more songs.

For example I usually prefer bands' first albums to everything else they release because usually their first albums have the most fresh sound. They have the attitude. The composing skills may not be that good but the songs usually have the attitude. IMO Led Zeppelin's two first albums were their best, Metallica's first album was their best, AC/DC's first international album was their best, Guns N' Roses's first album was their best. They were less experienced as songwriters when they did those albums but I still prefer them to what they have written later.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
You shouldn't try to come up with your style. You are your style. If you are trying to be something else than you are, you are not writing in your style.

It doesn't hurt to know how to compose in many genres, though. It can even change your style and improve your songs as you learn things from other genres. Playing/knowing how to make music in just one genre is a bad idea imo.
#10
Quote by Elintasokas
It doesn't hurt to know how to compose in many genres, though. It can even change your style and improve your songs as you learn things from other genres. Playing/knowing how to make music in just one genre is a bad idea imo.

Yeah, but my comment was about TS trying to be something else than he is. I think he's trying to create his style. And by style I don't only mean genres. If you listened to all of my songs, you could hear something similar between them, even if they were completely different genres.

When I write, I don't think about my style. I just write.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
The more you write music, the better you get at it. The more music you listen to, learn, and assimilate, the more tools you have in your belt.

If you go to Steve Vai's website, he has a seven-part essay about discovering what you sound like and practice ideas to develop your unique sound. Read them, they are very beneficial.
#12
Don't seek perfection, if you get stuck trying your songs to be perfect, there won't be any passion or expression in your music. If you don't like your FIRST songs, just end all your songs and with the time you will find your own style lmL
#14
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, but my comment was about TS trying to be something else than he is. I think he's trying to create his style. And by style I don't only mean genres. If you listened to all of my songs, you could hear something similar between them, even if they were completely different genres.

When I write, I don't think about my style. I just write.


Well yeah, actually you're right, now that I think about it. Usually that "style" goes through all genres.