#1
Are there any tips for improving pinch harmonics? I can do them pretty good on the 1st and 6th string but I can't really do them well on any of the other strings.
#2
There's no other technique tips on how to get a better pinch harmonic other than practice, as long as you know that they are caused by catching the string with your thumb after it's picked you just need to keep practicing it. I used to do a chromatic run on each string doing a pinch on every fret until I could do it! also find the sweet spot where you're picking (the note will ring better at certain points aboer the pick ups) as well as maybe having a bit more treble on your amp settings to make it easier at first
#3
I find it easier to get them when using sharp picks. Also make sure to mute the other strings properly to avoid any noise. And maybe try adding a little bit of vibrato.
#4
Quote by MattyPS
I find it easier to get them when using sharp picks. Also make sure to mute the other strings properly to avoid any noise. And maybe try adding a little bit of vibrato.


Dunlop Jazz III's or any of their derivatives are amazing for pinch harmonics. also try to angle the pick a little when going for it, and practice picking at different places on the string it will help you get the feel down I find that when using the bridge pickup on a LP style guitar picking right above the bridge edge of the neck pickup get the best squealie, for a strat picking above the neck edge of the middle pickup works in the same way, it's going to differ between guitars with different scale lengths.
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#5
my advice is to remember a few things

1) strike the string with the absolute tip of the pick

2) The thumb stopping any string vibration immediately after the pick (the main idea) should be one motion not two

3) To get the best sound I find changing the angle of the pick to point more upwards
- just mess around with the picking hand....when I was first learning I just repeatedly struck a string moving the angle of my pick all over trying to find what works

Lower gauge strings will help and that chromatic exercise sounds good.
And trying what Bloomy said just now seems to be a good tip too.
#6
In my opinion, knowing how harmonics work is very useful for this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5j2AxGGmT-g

With this knowledge you get to know what you're doing wrong a lot quicker.
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#7
Guitarist Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top set the standard of "soulfulness" in the rock guitar world with his smoldering pinch harmonic solos. You can add soulfulness to your guitar music by learning how to play pinch harmonics, too.

Although Gibbons is a masterful blues guitar player with a well-rounded playing approach, he’s best known for his edge-of-the-pick (also known as pinch) harmonics. To play a pinch harmonic, follow these steps
#8
Quote by Sowdenty

Although Gibbons is a masterful blues guitar player with a well-rounded playing approach, he’s best known for his edge-of-the-pick (also known as pinch) harmonics. To play a pinch harmonic, follow these steps


Nice cliffhanger. Anyways. Here are some tips for pinch harmonics.

1. The distance between where you fret the note with your left hand and pick the string with your right hand has a lot to do with the pitch of your pinch harmonic. No doubt you are familiar with natural harmonics? Note the space between the nut of your guitar and the your fretting finger. Those are the acceptable distances between where you fret and pick the note of your pinch harmonic.

2. Amp and guitar set-up are important. Having a tube driven amp will help. Turning up the gain will help. Turning up the treble nob or scooping the EQ will help. Making sure you are using the bridge pick up and it is set to the correct height will help.

3. You need to touch the string with the flat side of your thumb and mute it right after you pick the note. The less time between cleanly articulating the note and muting the string at the correct harmonic point will yield the true pinch harmonic you so covet.

4. Just practice! Practice your pentatonic scales with all pinch harmonics using the points above. Use two octave scale fingerings in different positions so you can get the hang of adjusting where you pick the note based on where you are fretting.

Happy squeeling!