#1
Are you (to those of you who use noise-cancellation headphones), able to hear those around you, without them yelling or any such thing?

I have some traditional earbuds and I like being able to have the ol', one-ear-in, one-ear-out thing, I can hear those around me, if I'm needed or if people are trying to talk to me

but conversely, when I'm out listening to things, if a car goes past or if there is heavy wind I'll find either I won't be able to hear at my current volume level, or, I'll end up turning whatever I'm listening to up (and I am worried about hearing damage / hearing loss).
#2
I like wearing headphones. It tells people that you don't want to be disturbed.
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#3
I can understand that, but in my case, I want to be able to be disturbed. There's plenty of times I might be inside on the laptop, but, either it's late, and people are sleeping, or other people are talking or what have you, and me having whatever I'm listening to on out loud would render the aforementioned harder, but I don't want to be uncontactable except on pains by the outside world.
#4
You need to install these features into the people around you:
1. Tap you on the shoulder if needed when wearing headphones
2. If they do not desire getting up then they can text you
3. Keep your phone on vibrate, close to your "special" spot
4. Writing handwritten notes and slipping them into your line of vision

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#5
my good headphones are open back so they dont really cancel much sound around me. i listen to music at reasonable volumes as well so the leakage isnt too bad. open back sounds much better, noise cancellation it really stupid.
#6
No, when using noise cancelling headphones, you will not hear those around you. Sometimes, a little bit of talking comes through, but most of it is blocked.

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#7
The way that active noise cancelling headphones work is by picking up noise around you (via a tiny microphone in the cup) and emitting an opposing low-frequency wave into the speakers. This interferes with outside noise and causes it to become greatly muffled. It can't block out everything, but even the sounds of passing traffic and people talking are significantly harder to hear than they would be with regular headphones.

Noise-canceling headphones also SORT OF compromise the sound quality of the music a bit, because the low wave it emits can screw around to some degree with the deep bass frequencies of the music. They are really only useful if you do a lot of traveling in noisy planes, trains, buses, etc and really need to block outside noise to hear the music
#8
i just have passive cancelling earbuds, they work ok
#9
Quote by jesse music
Are you (to those of you who use noise-cancellation headphones), able to hear those around you, without them yelling or any such thing?

I have some traditional earbuds and I like being able to have the ol', one-ear-in, one-ear-out thing, I can hear those around me, if I'm needed or if people are trying to talk to me

but conversely, when I'm out listening to things, if a car goes past or if there is heavy wind I'll find either I won't be able to hear at my current volume level, or, I'll end up turning whatever I'm listening to up (and I am worried about hearing damage / hearing loss).

Okay, a few things.

The 'one-ear-in, one-ear-out' thing is actually bad for your ears. The ears don't like the imbalance, one tries to compensate for the other, causes mild hearing damage. I don't recommend doing this very often.

Second, the noise cancelling headphones you see marketed are really, really terrible. Most of them introduce a new signal or process, thus you're not going to get the pure signal that you're intended to listen to.

Invest in some quality, over- the-ear headphones. I have a pair of Sony MDR-XB500 that I picked up for about $120 close to three years ago. They naturally block sound because of the over-the-ear design, so you don't risk hearing damage having to constantly up the volume.
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#10
obviously it depends on the model, but my noise-canceling sennheisers (i forgot the name) still allow me to hear if someone is trying to get my attention by talking to me. it also has a button you can press to let voice frequencies through if you want to talk without taking them off.

i always tend to listen to things at low volumes though, so it's easy for me to hear outside noises. still, the noise canceling part doesn't block everything out.
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#12
To be honest I have the fear of missing out something important be that a phone call from a client, an emergency call for help, fire, shooting, anything else with noise canceling headphones.


I do have closed back headphones for recording (where monitoring audio bleeding into the mic is not appreciated) and I listen to them with a reasonable volume, never enough hi to isolate me from the outer world
#13
Quote by HumanitysDeath
Okay, a few things.

The 'one-ear-in, one-ear-out' thing is actually bad for your ears. The ears don't like the imbalance, one tries to compensate for the other, causes mild hearing damage. I don't recommend doing this very often.

Second, the noise cancelling headphones you see marketed are really, really terrible. Most of them introduce a new signal or process, thus you're not going to get the pure signal that you're intended to listen to.

Invest in some quality, over- the-ear headphones. I have a pair of Sony MDR-XB500 that I picked up for about $120 close to three years ago. They naturally block sound because of the over-the-ear design, so you don't risk hearing damage having to constantly up the volume.


That is interesting to know, thank-you.

The over-ear headphones I was considering purchasing was a pair of V Moda Crossfade LP's, which are said to have "Analog Noise Isolation: Naturally cut out the distractions of jet engines, crying babies and crowd noise"

Do you know at all the type of noise-cancellation that is referring to?
#14
Quote by jesse music
That is interesting to know, thank-you.

The over-ear headphones I was considering purchasing was a pair of V Moda Crossfade LP's, which are said to have "Analog Noise Isolation: Naturally cut out the distractions of jet engines, crying babies and crowd noise"

Do you know at all the type of noise-cancellation that is referring to?


It's isolation, not cancellation. Trust me, I was a hifi salesperson for 3 years and a sales rep for another 3 odd years. Read my other post.
#16
ITT: some people clearly have no idea how noise cancellation works and are giving misinformation. 'Noise-cancelling' does not emit 'low frequency waves that interfere with your bass response' not does it 'add extra noises to your music'*.

It is a process actually called phase-cancellation and it works by playing back the same frequencies it detects but with inverted polarity, thus cancelling the waveform out into an amplitude of 0 (or silence)... if it was 100% efficient. Instead you're often left with a little leftover noise because the microphone picking up external sounds is not perfect (has a coloured frequency response) and the process takes a miniscule amount of time to kick in.

It works the same way that flipping the polarity of one speaker in a stereo system's output (through use of audio software easily available for anybody who wants to try it) when playing back mono mixes/sounds.

*Technically it is emitting noises, but the whole point is that they counteract the external noises so are unheard by the listener.


TS, if you want to be alert to the world - don't wear headphones, or keep the volume low enough to hear what you wanna hear. No pair of headphones will pre-empt the type of external noise around you and duck your volume ahead of something important taking place.
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#17
Quote by DisarmGoliath
TS, if you want to be alert to the world - don't wear headphones, or keep the volume low enough to hear what you wanna hear. No pair of headphones will pre-empt the type of external noise around you and duck your volume ahead of something important taking place.


I get that, and I'm sorry if it sounds like I'm asking for the silver bullet of headphones.

I'm just wanting something that largely diminishes (aside from turning the unit up too loud), the possibility of hearing loss, but at the same time, however ambiguously, I can hear if someone is trying to talk to me, even if it's just "wa-wa-wa-wa", Charlie Brown style.
#18
Shit good thread.
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#19
Quote by jesse music
I get that, and I'm sorry if it sounds like I'm asking for the silver bullet of headphones.

I'm just wanting something that largely diminishes (aside from turning the unit up too loud), the possibility of hearing loss, but at the same time, however ambiguously, I can hear if someone is trying to talk to me, even if it's just "wa-wa-wa-wa", Charlie Brown style.

Well, in-ears are worse than headphones regarding hearing damage (earphones fire the sound directly into your ear canal with no sound to escape elsewhere) so that's one step. Mainly, though, there really is no way of getting headphones that block outside noise without blocking people talking. Until somebody creates something that analyses incoming sound, while recording it, and if it decides the incoming signal is speech, it plays back the recording from when that speech started… and can do all that almost instantaneously, it will not exist like that.

The best you can do is just wear headphones that have a decent isolation from the outside/noise-cancelling headphones, and just have the music quieter. I mean, the whole point of headphones that block out sound well, or cancel it out with polarity inversion, is that you can then have your music quieter because there is less sound to mask from outside.

Not sure if you realise this, but your ear automatically adjusts its own 'gain', for want of a better word, depending on the level of the incoming signals it receives. If you're in a quiet environment, your ear boosts the level of what it hears, to pick up finer details. This means that you can have your music quieter but still hear it all, if the isolation is good enough to block out enough external noise. Then, if somebody wants to talk to you, they can get your attention.
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