#1
Hey there I want to get this theory sorted but I want to also get to like a mental standard on blues also learn more about jazz theory so ive got the jazz theory book and I wondered do you think I should double up my tom hess lessons or look for a crazy blues dude or just tab out all the best solos by ear and wig out infront of my bluesbreaker. Dont get me wrong I can pull off any hendrix lick but I want to make people look twice.

I value your opinion I know your all dedicated learners

Dont get me wrong my licks are pretty good but I want people to see me as the go to blues man just like they do with you guys for your niche
Last edited by guitarlessonsuk at Dec 13, 2013,
#2
Step 1: Stop learning licks and start learning techniques and ideas that you can turn into a multitude of licks at will. This will save you from becoming a lick robot, a common pitfall for many guitarists.
#5
Quote by Soccerguy
Isn't Tom Hess the asslick we got kicked off of UG?


Yes.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Ok 3 things .
Dont tab shit at all, Just learn ideas you like from your favorite guys and let them all blend to your own style.

In short, Play as much as you can over different rhythm & blues backings; slow blues, shuffle, Jump blues, ragtime, RnB, Delta blues, Whatever.

And when you feel like your out of ideas or want some new things, just learn them by ear and play them when you improvise. but if you just dont have any ideas at all you need to start singing and concentrating on what you WANT to hear instead of what you think you SHOULD hear.
Last edited by Ignore at Dec 13, 2013,
#7
Virtuoso? That's a tall order. Virtuosity within a style means a lot more than being good - it means perfecting, if not furthering, your art. Most famous players are not virtuosi in any style. If you really want to be a virtuoso blues player, learn everything you can about music and guitar, and apply it to the Blues. Practice technique obsessively, learn new music by ear every day, play music non-stop.

But you probably don't have time for all that.

More practical advice would be to LISTEN and play as much as you can. Practice the relevant techniques and really work them into your playing until they become second nature. Work on your rhythm and listening for changes. Just make sure you can hear, feel, and play in the groove, all the time.

Blues is about groove and emotive playing, and those skills just take time to earn. That's not to discourage you from being a virtuoso, but take care of the most important thing first.
#8
Quote by AlanHB
Yes.

I have no idea guys im with tom for some online lessons he is quite firm but h3 seems nice enough.

Saying that I think everyone is nice.

Im just here to talk music not to make anyone look bad.

Thanks for suggestions guys
#9
Quote by cdgraves
Virtuoso? That's a tall order. Virtuosity within a style means a lot more than being good - it means perfecting, if not furthering, your art. Most famous players are not virtuosi in any style. If you really want to be a virtuoso blues player, learn everything you can about music and guitar, and apply it to the Blues. Practice technique obsessively, learn new music by ear every day, play music non-stop.

But you probably don't have time for all that.

More practical advice would be to LISTEN and play as much as you can. Practice the relevant techniques and really work them into your playing until they become second nature. Work on your rhythm and listening for changes. Just make sure you can hear, feel, and play in the groove, all the time.

Blues is about groove and emotive playing, and those skills just take time to earn. That's not to discourage you from being a virtuoso, but take care of the most important thing first.


Thank you for the advice man

Maybe a tall order lol
Im the kinda guy that dreams alot
#10
Well, Christmas is close so I hope youve been good this year...

But really, it takes decades for that to happen Im afraid.

Start practicing. Technique and Ear training.
Quote by The Spoon
Unless you're sure she likes you, telling her you like her has a 110% chance of failing.

But hey, at least you have a 10% chance of absolutely guaranteeing failure.
Last edited by British_Steal at Dec 14, 2013,
#11
Quote by British_Steal
Well, Christmas is close so I hope youve been good this year...

But really, it takes decades for that to happen Im afraid.

Start practicing. Technique and Ear training.


Thanks man

Lol yeah might be a tall order this year but I practice 2 hrs a day.
On toms courses we do relative pitch training.
Ive hit lick library up for some dvds too

Im gonna do it
#12
Ive also just grabbed myself a week off to do some training
Last edited by guitarlessonsuk at Dec 14, 2013,
#13
In my opinion a good ear is the key, but of course you need good technique to execute things aswell.

I would recommend learning stuff by ear that you want to play. Learn all those blues licks and jazz licks or whatever by ear and SING them as you play them.

There is an important cycle i learned from a friend of mine that went to study jazz.

When you learn a phrase should:
1. Learn to play it by ear on your instrument.
2. Sing and play it at the same time.
3. Sing it and "ghost" it on your instrument. That is singing the correct notes and putting your fingers in the right places, but not playing the instrument.
4. Just sing the line over the chords that are behind it.
5. Repeat in all keys.

This is to:
1. Get the ideas into your head, so you remember them well.
2. You get a stronger connection to them in all keys so you can pull them out whenever you want.
3. You train your ear.
4. It will help you to naturally develop your creativity.

A good ear is the best thing you can have as a musician.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#14
Not to contradict my earlier piece of advice, but learning a song is a great way to add to your toolbox.

"I Smell A Rat" by Buddy Guy. Go listen. Somewhere at the beginning he bends the G string up a perfect fourth (5 frets), let it come back down, bends it back up, lets it come back down, then pushes it back up and let's it come down 1 half-step at a time.

You could take that lick and break it into a couple ideas. The first idea is bending up a perfect fourth or some similarly large interval like that, releasing he bend, bending back up, etc. You can apply that idea to various positions within a given key.

The other idea is hitting a larger interval with a bend, then hitting the other notes in the scale on your way back down. That can also be applied over the fretboard in a given key.

This is what I mean by learning techniques instead of exercises. You learn a lick, then you learn how to morph it until you've got it so ingrained that you can create your own music with an idea instead of being a lick robot.

BTW - that whole Buddy Guy tune is chock full of awesomeness if you are serious about getting good at blues. I love Buddy more than BB, more than Joe B, more than SRV, more than any of those guys really. I mean, I like them too, but Buddy is a bad man 8-)
#15
I should have included - learn actual songs! Blues is a traditional art form, meaning it has a variety of standard "feels", like slow blues and shuffle. The popular blues standards are perfect examples of the different style. Often when playing with others someone will call out a song title, or a key and feel, and you have to be able to jump right in.

Learn tunes back to front as often as possible, including the stops/starts, chord structure, riffs, intro licks, etc.
#16
Stop learning other peoples songs.......start feeling what your playing. No matter hon skilled you are and how much theory you learn becoming a blues virtouoso come from within. BB could put more into one bend than a metal-god could with 500 perfectly played notes in the same 30 seconds ...

Basically hoping to become a blues virt. ön the premisses of that you've learned all the right theory is kind of like me with my 15kg of overweight, 37 years of age and beard wanting to be the next Miss USA......just nöt going to happen. Could be due to the penis though....
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#17
Quote by Blackst4r
Stop learning other peoples songs.......start feeling what your playing. No matter hon skilled you are and how much theory you learn becoming a blues virtouoso come from within. BB could put more into one bend than a metal-god could with 500 perfectly played notes in the same 30 seconds ...

Basically hoping to become a blues virt. ön the premisses of that you've learned all the right theory is kind of like me with my 15kg of overweight, 37 years of age and beard wanting to be the next Miss USA......just nöt going to happen. Could be due to the penis though....


This is so silly...
#19
Must learn slide guitar.

Learn to play a ton of songs from the likes of these guys...
Robert Johnson
Lightning Hopkins
BB King
John Lee Hooker
Blind Lemon Jefferson
Lead Belly
T Bone Walker
Son House
Muddy Waters
Buddy Guy
Eric Clapton
Jimi Hendrix
Stevie Ray Vaughan

Also just sit around and play, all day, everyday.
Si
#20
Quote by Morphogenesis26
This is so silly...


As is the thread....

...I do look pretty hot in a bikini though.
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#21
Quote by Blackst4r
As is the thread....

...I do look pretty hot in a bikini though.



Whats silly about wanting to get good?
#22
Absolutely nothing.....It's the virtouoso part I find amusing and the fact that your getting advice on how to technically improve at playing blues like it is jazz. In my humble opinion I honestly believe that excelling at blues has nothing to do with an amazing arsenal of licks, theory's and solos....sure it will definitially help you sound good if you can get close to the feeling captured in a song....just like the awesome AC/DC coverband I saw a few years ago where the awesome "angus" rode around on the shoulders of a stage hand and played the perfect t'n't solo.....

Do you see what I'm aiming att. I started playing blues 20 years ago...I'm pretty decent att playing, know my theory and can höld my own in a solo.....I have a friend though that now has 3 records out and is doing pretty well forehimself and is recognised as a driven blues musician. Technically and theoretically I know more than him .....and I am still amazed hon he can play a 3 minute song with basically 1 chord and make it so dramatic,dynamic, and full of life.....mabye he just put some bones in a box and waited 3nights for a black dressed man.
Last edited by Blackst4r at Dec 14, 2013,
#23
Quote by Blackst4r
Absolutely nothing.....It's the virtouoso part I find amusing and the fact that your getting advice on how to technically improve at playing blues like it is jazz. In my humble opinion I honestly believe that excelling at blues has nothing to do with an amazing arsenal of licks, theory's and solos....sure it will definitially help you sound good if you can get close to the feeling captured in a song....just like the awesome AC/DC coverband I saw a few years ago where the awesome "angus" rode around on the shoulders of a stage hand and played the perfect t'n't solo.....

Do you see what I'm aiming att. I started playing blues 20 years ago...I'm pretty decent att playing, know my theory and can höld my own in a solo.....I have a friend though that now has 3 records out and is doing pretty well forehimself and is recognised as a driven blues musician. Technically and theoretically I know more than him .....and I am still amazed hon he can play a 3 minute song with basically 1 chord and make it so dramatic,dynamic, and full of life.....mabye he just put some bones in a box and waited 3nights for a black dressed man.


I approve of this post.

And "must learn slide guitar..." well, I would say "Who can't play slide?" And then I remember all those wankers I saw at bars who just happened to pick up a slide at the store while buying strings, or the many unnecessary extra guitar players with slides and lapsteel/pushtable/pedalsteel guys in country music. It, too, goes along with deep feeling as well as wondering what goes through Duane Allman.
#25
If you want to be a great blues guitarist I would honestly advise you to become a very proficient rhythm guitarist. The blues is all about the rhythm for the most part! Learn all songs by ear don't even look twice with tabs in order to become a great blues musician you need great ears. And developing great ears takes time, and patience not to mention self discipline!
#26
Quote by guitarlessonsuk
Hey there I want to get this theory sorted but I want to also get to like a mental standard on blues also learn more about jazz theory so ive got the jazz theory book and I wondered do you think I should double up my tom hess lessons or look for a crazy blues dude or just tab out all the best solos by ear and wig out infront of my bluesbreaker. Dont get me wrong I can pull off any hendrix lick but I want to make people look twice.

I value your opinion I know your all dedicated learners

Dont get me wrong my licks are pretty good but I want people to see me as the go to blues man just like they do with you guys for your niche


Tom Hess is the man
#27
Quote by walkerbob19
Tom Hess is the man


Join Date: Dec 2013

Seems legit.
.