#1
Hi dear members of UG!! Lately I’ve stumbled upon this D major scale run pattern, but I’m facing difficulties playing this one. If I’m not wrong then I think it’s a legato run. The main problem I’m facing is I can’t execute the pull-offs of this run with ease while changing strings, although I know how to play both hammer-on and pull-off. Should I place the others fingers of my fretting hand first on the fretboard that won’t pull-off first, or I should place the finger that will execute the very first pull-off just after picking the first note on the fretboard? I’m really confused here as I’ve never played anything like this. Can anyone help me with this? I’ll be expecting for your constructive comments and helpful suggestions.

Here’s the tab of the pattern:
#2
I'm guessing you'd probably want to put all the fingers on the next string at once, otherwise you can't really pull off to them.

in theory, anyway.

in practice you might have a fraction of a second's grace in between when you have the first note fretted and when you have to pull off to the other fingers, where you could place the other fingers you're pulling off to.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Are you hammering on to the next string with your pinky when changing strings? I would play that passage with my left hand entirely, except for the bend at the end anyways.

Changing strings using a hammer on is an important legato skill and this is a pretty good passage to learn it on since you are pulling off each of the three notes per string. If you can master hammering on to the next string you will be able to play this much faster in the long run.

Anyhow, aside from that advice, just use your basic practice strategies. Break it down into smaller pieces, maybe practicing the pull-offs on each string separately if that is where you have issues. You can also isolate where you change to the next string with a hammer on if that's what your weakness is. Either way, practice it with an eye for good economy of motion and be on guard against any tension in your hand. If you are having difficulty playing it cleanly, slow down your metronome some more.
Last edited by onelightminute at Dec 15, 2013,
#4
I'd say that being able to "hammer on from nowhere" and also picking on separate strings in the middle of a legato passage are useful- it'd be handy to be able to do (and practise) both, in other words.

Aside from that, agreed.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
Quote by Dave_Mc
I'm guessing you'd probably....

Thank you for helping.
Quote by onelightminute
Are you hammering on to the next string....

I pick the first note when I switch the strings. Changing strings using a hammer means executing a hammer-on from nowhere, right? I’ve tried that and I think it takes a bit of extra force than usual. It’ll make the whole passage sounds even smoother and fluid I think as there is no picked note played at all.

I’m completely new to this kind of playing. I’ve been trying to play the passage clearly, but for some weird reason my fretting fingers get really tensed up while pulling off and this really adds tension. Is this normal? I’m also facing difficulties to place the fingers on fretboad in time. How I can tackle these problems?
#6
Quote by stranger_23


I’m completely new to this kind of playing. I’ve been trying to play the passage clearly, but for some weird reason my fretting fingers get really tensed up while pulling off and this really adds tension. Is this normal? I’m also facing difficulties to place the fingers on fretboad in time. How I can tackle these problems?


Try this.

Set your metronome to a reasonable tempo, say 75 BPM.

Practice the passage, but take one click of the metronome in between each note by muting the note just played after you play it.

So.. for each tick, it would be like "pull-off / mute / pull-off / mute / pull-off / mute / hammer-on to next string / mute / etc"

It sounds weird to break up a legato run like that in order to practice it but what you are doing is conditioning your fingers to apply force and then release it after the note is played versus applying force and allowing it to grow cumulatively as you play through the passage.