#3
I would rather recommend that instead of learning different scales and their shapes on the fretboard, to actually learning how they sound. You can do this by learning the intervals of the Ionian Mode / Major Scale in any key you want, just try to stick to one particular key so you can get a feel of how each mode or scale differs. Most scales revolve around the Major scale so learning that will help you to learn all the others, you'll just need to do some research on intervals. Using this method will allow you to play a particular scale anywhere on the fretboard at will rather than to rely on a shape. Good luck!
#4
Quote by Bryan Jacobo
I would rather recommend that instead of learning different scales and their shapes on the fretboard, to actually learning how they sound


This
#5
Most people learn just the dots of a guitar book and stay there...thats only stage one that passes off pretty quickly...then you have to replace the dots with intervals, thats a huge step cause you ll know what scale degree you are playing at any given moment, that ll also strenghten your chord and arpeggio knowledge...then learn them on one string only....there is no better way to see the intervals clearly than to play a scale on one string.

Of course along all these you have to be able to sing the scale at any given moment from memory.Sure you may be able to sing the major scale(Do,RE,MI,FA,SOL,LA,SI,DO) but can you sing for example the natural minor? or the Dorian? if you cant then you really dont know them even if you play their shapes so....make it a part of your practise.....

So as you can see you have to attack the problem from different angles but if you do that then you ll REALLY know the scale,its sound its degrees on the fretboard..everything .
Last edited by Dreamdancer11 at Dec 16, 2013,
#6
Quote by Bryan Jacobo
I would rather recommend that instead of learning different scales and their shapes on the fretboard, to actually learning how they sound.

This too, scales aren't a "guitar thing", they're a universal concept in music that apply equally to all instruments. That being the case, they're defined by their sounds , not the shapes or patterns.

If you've just learned a bunch of dots, or even the notes and intervals, but haven't learned the sounds of those notes and intervals, then you can't truly say you've "learned a scale".
Actually called Mark!

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#7
So wait a sec are you saying I should learn the sounds and not the notes?
#8
Quote by redd9
So wait a sec are you saying I should learn the sounds and not the notes?


Lets take the Bminor scale.Its cool if you know that its has the notes B, C♯, D, E, F♯, G, A but that doesnt make you KNOW the scale.Its more important to know it as 1,2,b3,4,5,b6,b7,1 so 1)to know the intervallic construction of it...2)how those intervals physically appear on the fretboard and 3)last but not least their sound.If someone for example gives you the B note you must be able to sing the rest of the scale back and forth.

Doing those three things above you ll know every minor scale to play and sing without the need to recall the actual note names for Bminor then for A minor then for Cminor etc etc etc......

Apply the same process to every scale .
#9
Quote by Dreamdancer11
Lets take the Bminor scale.Its cool if you know that its has the notes B, C♯, D, E, F♯, G, A but that doesnt make you KNOW the scale.Its more important to know it as 1,2,b3,4,5,b6,b7,1 so 1)to know the intervallic construction of it...2)how those intervals physically appear on the fretboard and 3)last but not least their sound.If someone for example gives you the B note you must be able to sing the rest of the scale back and forth.

Doing those three things above you ll know every minor scale to play and sing without the need to recall the actual note names for Bminor then for A minor then for Cminor etc etc etc......

Apply the same process to every scale .


I understand, since when I think of the minor pentatonic scale i think of it as a certain pattern of finger movements as far as fretting is concerned. Is that what you mean?
#10
Quote by redd9
I understand, since when I think of the minor pentatonic scale i think of it as a certain pattern of finger movements as far as fretting is concerned. Is that what you mean?


Finger movements is just part of it.They key word here is intervals.....know them and you ll not only learn scales but also arpeggios chords etc etc etc.You can move your finger correctly but you also need to know the place you are moving into......for example you know and play the A minor pentatonic but each time you press the frets you should know instantly...."ok now iam playing the b3....now the 4th...now the b7th" etc etc etc.....not just faceless dots...thats also one of the reasons some people solo better than others...cause when the X chord plays they know the want to hit that Y particular note for best effect, not just sliding aimlessly over fret dots.

See everything as intervallic structures....cause if you see the A you must see the 3rd and the fifth...so you can play instantly an A major chord....or if you can see the 3rd the fifth and the b7 you can play the Adominant 7th chord or arpeggio or or or...you name it.....

If you know a Queensryche old song..."i see in infra-red" paraphrazing that you goal is to."see in intervals".Think of them as the building blocks of music....anything you want to make in music is by combining those 12 intervals....and if you start recognizing their sound too....then you ll be golden .