#1
Hi all,

Hoping to hear your advice once more .

Looking for a guitar and narrowed down my search to the PRS SE Series. Great, great sound, great looks... but there's always a but.

SE's seem to come with two types of bridges, the PRS Tremolo (Floyd Rose type) and the Les Paul type. Being used to the Fender-type fixed bridge, I find myself at ease with neither. The Les Paul bridge doesn't allow space for my palm for the muting technique I am used to and I can't stand floating whammy's either. Which leaves me with a dilemma.

I simply found no guitar in my price range (600 euro / 700$) with the brilliant clear PRS tone I fell in love with. However, what to do with the bridge..

- Lock it? (in that case, wouldn't it be a waste not to go for solid body in the first place?)
- Trying to get used to the Les Paul bridge which, for now, just doesn't feel right?

By the way, I like to lower the key of a note using the tremolo, but prefer bends for climbing notes over the tremolo.

Hoping anyone can help me out on this one .
Last edited by Envinyatar1987 at Dec 16, 2013,
#2
I would go with the tremolo myself. Rather have it there if I ever decided to start using it over wish I had it. Step outside your comfort zone. You might end up loving it.

Are you buying new?
#3
Hmmz.. I do have experience with a whammy and it hasn't been a particularly good one. Played an Ibanez RG for a while and felt that bending multiple strings (also combined with open strings) causes immense dissonance. Also limits tuning options and, personally felt that it just doesn't feel as sturdy and reliable.

Planning on a new one, yes. Fell in love with the wonderfully warm bright tone of the SE 245, but I miss the playability (the neck is quite fat) and the bridge of the strat. Looking into the SE Custom and the SE Santana now. They seem lovely, apart from. Well. Yeah.
Last edited by Envinyatar1987 at Dec 16, 2013,
#4
You will get used to the bridge if you go for the LP type. I own guitars with LP type, floyds, and a strat style. I can mute all of them effectively without really thinking about it too much.
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#5
i would go for the floyd style as way more versatile and stable re tuning. i was in a similar position and got used to it very quick, now i cant stop doing dime style dive bombs etc....
#6
Go for the lp style. I used to only have guitars with strat style bridges but the chugging palm muted tones are sounding way better out of my lp. But I've never owned a floyd rose equipped guitar and I would have to imagine that a floyd rose equipped guitar would have to be able to produce good chugging sounds
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#7
Thanks for the comments guys! Greatly appreciated. Slightly growing in favour of the idea of blocking the bridge with a piece of wood/metal. As said, I like to use the tremolo from time to time to drop a note (dive only). What's more, the strat models come with a slimmer neck, and in some cases, a coil-tap, increasing its versatility even more. Still working towards a conclusive decision though.
Last edited by Envinyatar1987 at Dec 16, 2013,
#8
Well, to start the PRS trem isn't floyd like at all.

That being said, go for the hardtail. Replace it with a bridge with adjustable saddles if you ever change the string gauge/tuning.
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#9
Go with the fixed bridge, your tone will have a bit more body thanks to the chunk of wood you spare and you get used to it.
I bought a fixed bridge PRS and it ddin't feel right in the beginning either, it's normal it just needs some geting used to.
#10
PRS has 3 types of bridges. Wraparound stop bar style, PRS vintage trem and FR locking trem (there are 2 types of PRS vintage trem, USA and SE)

I play with several guitars that have TOM style bridges, I have a PRS Trem and Fender string thru Tele's. I can play each just fine
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
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#11
Quote by oneblackened
Well, to start the PRS trem isn't floyd like at all.


Could you elaborate on that for a bit? I know it's a different brand, but the mechanics seem very similar to my untrained eye.
#12
Quote by Robbgnarly
PRS has 3 types of bridges. Wraparound stop bar style, PRS vintage trem and FR locking trem (there are 2 types of PRS vintage trem, USA and SE)

I play with several guitars that have TOM style bridges, I have a PRS Trem and Fender string thru Tele's. I can play each just fine

+1.Mostly this.

Do you have a link to which SE models your considering?

This Santana model has their vintage trem. http://www.prsguitars.com/sesantana/specs.php
The SE custom 24 also comes with the same type of bridge. Actually most of their SE models comes with the floating/fulcrum 6 point trem. The workings of their floating bridge are more or less like the vintage 6 point fender trem. Some of SE models have a option to choose between their vintage trem or their stop tail(fixed) bridge. What I dislike about the SE models is their nut material & bridge material, I'd change them out if I were to get one.

This SE torero comes with emg's & a floyd. http://www.prsguitars.com/setorero/

Now as far as wanting to use the trem to drop the pitch once in a while, what can be done is that you deck it to body(not block it completely) such that you can lower the pitch but not raise it up. Should help to keep it in tune a touch better than normal.
Push Pull pots are not that expensive, can be added later if needed.
#13
Quote by Envinyatar1987
Could you elaborate on that for a bit? I know it's a different brand, but the mechanics seem very similar to my untrained eye.


A floyd rose has a locking nut and fine tuners on the bridge. They are mostly a pain to set up because you have to loosen the nut, set up the bridge, finetune etc...
The PRS trem isn't like that at all. It doesn't lock the string anywhere and doesn't float as much as a floyd. That means it doesn't even take half as long to set up and setups aren't difficult to do. Blocking it isn't difficult either, but if you're not planning on using the trem i'd go for the fixed bridge since it has a tonal advantage.
#14
Yeah you'll get used to the TOM bridge really quickly. The SE bridges aren't amazing, but the TOM-style bridge is far superior to the SE trem bridges.
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#15
I have an SE with the stock trem system. I chose to block it off because for me it wasn't staying in tune and I didn't like the way it sat. To each their own but I only buy fixed bridges anymore.

Good luck
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#16
Thanks for all the input dudes!

I tested the PRS SE 245 (fixed bridge). I was completely hooked and virtually bought it. When I got home, my strat instincts acted up and when seeing there was also a custom version, I began to second-guess my choice.
Early this week, I tested the PRS SE Custom, I decided that the sustain was far inferior to the PRS SE 245's (also open strings going out of tune during double stop bends) and I fell back on my early love for the 245, which I will pick up next monday. I'm sure it's a matter of taste, however, to me it feels like the thick, large, solid mahogany body and the fixed bridge go incredibly well with the creamy sound of the humbuckers.

In short: the PRS SE 245 (les paul model) and the PRS Custom are both incredibly good qualitative-wise (also quantitative-wise, taking the the price-value ratio into account). However, it seems like the 245 does the les paul trick hands down, whereas the custom, as a hybrid, does both the les paul and the strat trick quite okay (and that is, compared to the SE 245). If I buy a full-strat later, which will probably be a Fender, I will certainly keep playing my SE 245 as well for my Les Paul tones.
#17
You can get a adjustable wraparound bridge for the PRS for <$40 at www.guitarfetish.com and they work really well (better than the stock wraparound)
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate