#1
I was just curious about this technique....it seems promising, but wouldn't it just make you develop bad picking habits?

Bursting, for anyone that dosent know, involves practice little "bursts" of speed involving 3 or 4 notes. You just picking these notes as fast as you can and stop, take a couple seconds and then do it again.

I want to pick strictly from the wrist. but when you want to play as fast as you possibly can for that little burst, wouldn't it come from the elbow? I really don't want to develop any picking habits like this, and wouldn't this technique strongly enforce that?

Feel free to correct me if i'm wrong! Would love to hear from people who have had success with these technique!!

And also, how much time should be spent practicing this kind of technique? 15 minutes? 30? an hour? That would be useful information as well!
Last edited by McZaxon at Dec 16, 2013,
#2
I've previously used bursting to break through mental plateaus, but with a different method to prevent elbow picking.

My approach would involve playing, for example, a four note, sixteenth note phrase at a comfortable pace in which I could pick in a relaxed manner from my wrist, and with control over dynamics, articulation and tonal quality. I would repeat the phrase for three quarter note beats, and on the fourth, play the phrase twice, this time as 32nd notes to complete another quarter note beat. Both the 16th and 32nd note variations were alternate picked.
Using this approach, my picking technique remained the same, and I didn't notice any degradation of control or relaxation. The idea isn't to push as fast as you can, but to find that comfortable ''half-time'' picking pace and relate it directly to your faster picking; it shouldn't be treated as a speed-building exercise so much as a method of learning how to stay relaxed and in control. As such, I wouldn't recommend doing it for more than a couple of minutes at a time, but it can be repeated a couple of times a day, too.
#3
Ok, just to start this off: this practice technique is largely credited to Shawn Lane who was, by all reports, actually some kind of physical, as well as mental, genius. I do not say that lightly. Shawn generally had all his physical playing sorted by the age of 16 so please take most of what he says with regard to practice with a pinch of salt; that age isn't exactly conducive to remembering exactly what you did.

Secondly: when people talk about this they talk about interspersing seriously slow practice sessions with parts where you take the thing you're practicing and play it, and I cannot stress this enough, at the fastest speed you can comfortably. It's not about pushing your technique to breaking point, it's about getting physically and mentally comfortable with the process of playing quickly. You might have to get yourself used to the idea of playing without thinking which is just not something you can do while playing slowly and these speed bursts are designed to do that.
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#4
the point of doing this is probably to reinforce muscle memory by always stopping and starting cold. sort of like how people recommend fretting a difficult chord, taking your hand off the fretboard and breaking the shape, then trying to drop onto the fretboard with the chord again.

you certainly always have to observe your technique though.
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#5
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Ok, just to start this off: this practice technique is largely credited to Shawn Lane who was, by all reports, actually some kind of physical, as well as mental, genius. I do not say that lightly. Shawn generally had all his physical playing sorted by the age of 16 so please take most of what he says with regard to practice with a pinch of salt; that age isn't exactly conducive to remembering exactly what you did.

Secondly: when people talk about this they talk about interspersing seriously slow practice sessions with parts where you take the thing you're practicing and play it, and I cannot stress this enough, at the fastest speed you can comfortably. It's not about pushing your technique to breaking point, it's about getting physically and mentally comfortable with the process of playing quickly. You might have to get yourself used to the idea of playing without thinking which is just not something you can do while playing slowly and these speed bursts are designed to do that.



So basically you suggest that I play these licks with these "bursts" of speed, but not as fast as humanly possible and at a speed I wont throw off my technique at? Like for instance, this alternate picking lick has a top speed of 130bpm 16th notes. That is EXACTALLY where my wrist tenses up. or at 127ish. How do I fit these burst in? should I set the metronome to 130 and play little bursts there?
#6
Quote by McZaxon
So basically you suggest that I play these licks with these "bursts" of speed, but not as fast as humanly possible and at a speed I wont throw off my technique at? Like for instance, this alternate picking lick has a top speed of 130bpm 16th notes. That is EXACTALLY where my wrist tenses up. or at 127ish. How do I fit these burst in? should I set the metronome to 130 and play little bursts there?


Exactly, the bursts should be at your limit, not some arbitrary figure beyond what you know you can do.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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Legion.