#1
Theres this little part in the development section of one of Beethoven's piano sonatas that I really like. Its only about two measures long. I can think of so many ideas of what to do with it, would it be stealing if I delibrately took this and wrote my own piece around it?
#2
People did that all the time in the past. Beethoven himself did this quite a bit. But it is courteous to give homage to the composer you are quoting off.
#4
Quote by chronic_stp
Theres this little part in the development section of one of Beethoven's piano sonatas that I really like. Its only about two measures long. I can think of so many ideas of what to do with it, would it be stealing if I delibrately took this and wrote my own piece around it?


It's only stealing if you're copying it note for note. If you change the notes and/or the rhythm, you are using synthetic creativity to write music, which is a viable and often used strategy by many.

Also - things written by long dead composers like Beethoven are not protected by copyright law and as such can be plagiarized at will.
#5
Lots of rock musicians have used parts of classical pieces in their songs (though I think it usually sounds kind of cheesy).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGjmXhES2wQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydl1IIYCLRc

Isn't Malmsteen's whole career based on that?

And yeah, there's nothing wrong with that (as long as you don't claim you composed that part). And even if there was, you could just write for yourself, you don't need to release everything you write.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 18, 2013,
#6
I'm fairly certain the Beatles took an entire chord progression (I can't remember if Bach or Beethoven originally wrote it), sped it up a lot, and then made it the foundation of one of theirs songs.