#1
hi guys
I'm getting a custom neck built.
Know that the body is made of ash, afn that it'll be bolt on, 24 frets neck, rosewood fingerborad, what are the diffenrences between

Peruvian walnut
Birdseye maple
Rockmap

for the neck. Please, don't tell me the color of the wood "cuz that will not help me.
Thanks again
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#2
Not very much. Walnut is supposedly a bit warmer than maple. The difference between the birdseye and rock maple is just aesthetic - birdseye maple is very pretty.
#3
Go to this site.
http://www.warmoth.com/pages/CustomNeck.aspx?style=9
Where it says SHAFT WOOD click on MORE INFO. All you need to know about wood

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#4
here is a simple wood rule, the lighter the color of the wood the lighter the tone, the more higher end, the darker the wood the darker and more low end the wood.
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#5
Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
here is a simple wood rule, the lighter the color of the wood the lighter the tone, the more higher end, the darker the wood the darker and more low end the wood.


so how does ebony fit into this, being that it is super bright?????
#6
It doesn't, there's no actual correlation like that. Pau Ferro is fairly bright but looks like rosewood, Korina ranges from fairly light to very dark but the tone is similar to mahogany regardless of the color, wenge is quite dark but has a fairly balanced tone, and ebony has literally become a synonym for jet black and yet it is probably the brightest wood out there.

That "rule" basically only works for the few most basic woods used - mahogany vs. alder/poplar for bodies, and rosewood vs. maple for necks and boards. Once you get beyond that minor coincidence, it doesn't hold up at all.
#7
Quote by Roc8995
It doesn't, there's no actual correlation like that. Pau Ferro is fairly bright but looks like rosewood, Korina ranges from fairly light to very dark but the tone is similar to mahogany regardless of the color, wenge is quite dark but has a fairly balanced tone, and ebony has literally become a synonym for jet black and yet it is probably the brightest wood out there.

That "rule" basically only works for the few most basic woods used - mahogany vs. alder/poplar for bodies, and rosewood vs. maple for necks and boards. Once you get beyond that minor coincidence, it doesn't hold up at all.


pretty much what I was thinking/getting at