#1
I play primarily in Drop B, Drop C and Drop C#

I never play in standard so I don't know why I'd want to learn scales in a tuning I don't use, but rather than committing a lot of practice time learning scales in my current tuning and finding out I should have started in standard...I thought I'd just ask on here; So...

Are there any benefits to learning chords/scales in standard tuning despite never using it?

Another thing I've noticed is, when there are scale tutorials on youtube, they show a single position for that scale.
I've been learning off these: http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=FULL&scch=C&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=5&choice=1
and there are ~252 position/key variations in a single scale (major/minor) etc. granted, some of them are the same.

I don't really know where to go...I was just learning every single position in each key (I'm still not finished with C major yet...) So to learn a good number of scales with this method seems very ineffective and time consuming.

How should I be learning scales in a practical and effective way instead of just memorizing patterns?
#2
For myself at least I basically learned as much theory as I can in standard and from there everything in my head works as if I'm in that tuning, no matter what.

For example: I'm tuned to C# standard. The song is in the key of A minor. That puts the root on the 8th fret of the lowest string as an example.

In my brain, I'm playing pure C minor because that's how it looks on a guitar in standard tuning. In my opinion if you work that way it gives everything a certain universality; everything is always the same, even when it's different
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr

For example: I'm tuned to C# standard. The song is in the key of A minor. That puts the root on the 8th fret of the lowest string as an example.


That brings me to another question, on the scale generator, I set it to be in the key of say E, but the root note is almost never an E, I was under the impression that the key of a scale can be determined by it's root note, but apparently not... What actually dictates what key a scale is in?
#4
Quote by Viscerus
That brings me to another question, on the scale generator, I set it to be in the key of say E, but the root note is almost never an E, I was under the impression that the key of a scale can be determined by it's root note, but apparently not... What actually dictates what key a scale is in?


If the scale is an E scale, the root note has to be E. There's no other option. Do you mean that maybe in that E scale, there are notes that go lower than the E due to your guitar being tuned down? If that is the case, just because the note is the lowest note of that scale that can be played on that instrument does not make it the root note. You're just starting somewhere in the middle of the scale rather than on the root note.
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#5
Quote by theogonia777
If the scale is an E scale, the root note has to be E. There's no other option. Do you mean that maybe in that E scale, there are notes that go lower than the E due to your guitar being tuned down? If that is the case, just because the note is the lowest note of that scale that can be played on that instrument does not make it the root note. You're just starting somewhere in the middle of the scale rather than on the root note.


For example, this: http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=7&scch=E&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=5&choice=1

The 7th pattern of an E-major scale in Drop B, yet the E is the last note played before looping back round to the root note of F# so I'm not too sure why that is. I would have thought an E major scale would need to start on an E, I thought that's what made it an E major scale...
#6
Quote by Viscerus
For example, this: http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=7&scch=E&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=5&choice=1

The 7th pattern of an E-major scale in Drop B, yet the E is the last note played before looping back round to the root note of F# so I'm not too sure why that is. I would have thought an E major scale would need to start on an E, I thought that's what made it an E major scale...


I think it's pictured like that only because you have it set to pattern 7, so it just starts on the 7th fret even if it's in the middle of the scale. If you set it to pattern 5 then it will start on the root.
#7
Or another way to look at it is it will show any notes from the scale that happen to be located on the 7th fret.
#8
Quote by Viscerus
The 7th pattern of an E-major scale in Drop B, yet the E is the last note played before looping back round to the root note of F# so I'm not too sure why that is. I would have thought an E major scale would need to start on an E, I thought that's what made it an E major scale...


What defines a scale is kind of the root and also at the same time really not. A scale is defined by two things, mainly: the note it resolves to (the root) and the tonality of the sound (major, minor, dominant and diminished are the main four there).

The problem you're having is that you're under the misapprehension that the root is where a scale "starts" or "ends"; that has literally nothing to do with it. The physical arrangement of a scale on the fretboard is completely incidental to the sound, which is what actually defines a scale.

In the example of E major, the notes are E, F#, G#, A, B, C# and D#. Playing a piece that is in E major means that you play those notes in such a way that it resolves to E, the easiest example being to play a chord progression that goes: A, B7, E. It resolves strongly to E and has a major tonality.

The fact that this falls in a certain place on the fretboard in a certain tuning is basically just the practical RESULT of the sound.

That's not to say it's not worth learning how the scales fall on the fretboard, learning these things physically is absolutely crucial of course, but you really should come at it with the right mentality first and foremost.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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