#1
How do you guys switch from a major barre chord rooted on the 6th string to a major barre chord rooted on the 5th string? I find that it's one of the hardest chord transitions to do if you have to play it fast.
#2
It's just hard because you're not used to doing it.

Although really the 'best' way to do it will change depending on how you finger the 5th string root chord, which way are you fingering it now?
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#3
Oh, that change, eh? You see it all the time in classic rock, songs like Communication Breakdown for instance.

Anyway, did you know that with that major chord voicing where you have the root on the 5th string that if you just keep your finger barred across all six strings, you can still play that lower note because it's part of the chord?

--5----5----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--5----5----
-------5---

Chord on the left is what you're playing... chord on the right is what I suggested. It's still a D major, the difference is that the chord on the right is the second inversion of D major, which simply means we took the fifth (that's the note you add to another note make a power chord) and we added it to the bass (lowest note of chord).

Anyhow, I suggested using this voicing because then you don't have to slide your barre from 5 strings to 6 strings when you change that chord.

Aside from that, can't help you. I play that A form major barre chord with two barres - my index finger, and then I barre other three notes with my ring finger. Weird, I know, but I can still get the high E string to ring. Doing that also makes it really easy but some would argue that's not good technique because most people won't be able to get the E string to ring.
#4
Quote by onelightminute
Oh, that change, eh? You see it all the time in classic rock, songs like Communication Breakdown for instance.

Anyway, did you know that with that major chord voicing where you have the root on the 5th string that if you just keep your finger barred across all six strings, you can still play that lower note because it's part of the chord?

--5----5----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--5----5----
-------5---

Chord on the left is what you're playing... chord on the right is what I suggested. It's still a D major, the difference is that the chord on the right is the second inversion of D major, which simply means we took the fifth (that's the note you add to another note make a power chord) and we added it to the bass (lowest note of chord).

Anyhow, I suggested using this voicing because then you don't have to slide your barre from 5 strings to 6 strings when you change that chord.

Aside from that, can't help you. I play that A form major barre chord with two barres - my index finger, and then I barre other three notes with my ring finger. Weird, I know, but I can still get the high E string to ring. Doing that also makes it really easy but some would argue that's not good technique because most people won't be able to get the E string to ring.


Yeah, that's how I've been doing it. Seems like this is the best way. Lately I have been listening to a lot of ska music, and the intro to "Keasbey Nights" by Streetlight Manifesto uses fast barre chord changes.
#5
Just practice it then, man. Get your metronome out, get the beat going, and take a three step approach.

1. Fret the chord, but don't push the strings down yet. Just touch them.
2. Push the strings down and strum the chord.
3. Release the chord and strum again, muting the strings this time.

Then fret a new chord when you repeat the steps. Take one click of the metronome per step, or two if need be, whatever works. You can use that method to practice chord changes reliably.
#6
Quote by onelightminute
Oh, that change, eh? You see it all the time in classic rock, songs like Communication Breakdown for instance.

Anyway, did you know that with that major chord voicing where you have the root on the 5th string that if you just keep your finger barred across all six strings, you can still play that lower note because it's part of the chord?

--5----5----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--5----5----
-------5---

Chord on the left is what you're playing... chord on the right is what I suggested. It's still a D major, the difference is that the chord on the right is the second inversion of D major, which simply means we took the fifth (that's the note you add to another note make a power chord) and we added it to the bass (lowest note of chord).

Anyhow, I suggested using this voicing because then you don't have to slide your barre from 5 strings to 6 strings when you change that chord.

Aside from that, can't help you. I play that A form major barre chord with two barres - my index finger, and then I barre other three notes with my ring finger. Weird, I know, but I can still get the high E string to ring. Doing that also makes it really easy but some would argue that's not good technique because most people won't be able to get the E string to ring.

You're absolutely right in suggesting keeping the full barre in place as the most efficient way of switching between them, but you wouldn't actually play that note on the low E string because it isn't part of the chord you're wanting - that extra A in the bass note makes it a D/A which isn't the same chord as D major.
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#7
If I'm going from a barre shaped chord from the 6th to the 5th string, I usually tuck my pointer finger underneath and grab the root note, then let that bring my other fingers up for the other two or three notes.

I hope that makes sense, because it's kind of hard to explain.

To be honest, my hands never really stray that far from the fretboard. It's more of a shifting movement.

Keep in mind that the jump between strings is short, so let your pointer finger (or whatever finger is playing the root note) lead the way on that one. Then, if you need to change frets when playing two different barre chords, it's just a matter of sliding the shape up or down the fretboard.

Keep working though -- it'll come.
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#8
Quote by onelightminute
(...)
Anyway, did you know that with that major chord voicing where you have the root on the 5th string that if you just keep your finger barred across all six strings, you can still play that lower note because it's part of the chord?

--5----5----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--7----7----
--5----5----
-------5---

Chord on the left is what you're playing... chord on the right is what I suggested. It's still a D major, the difference is that the chord on the right is the second inversion of D major, which simply means we took the fifth (that's the note you add to another note make a power chord) and we added it to the bass (lowest note of chord).
(...)

Yes it's the same notes but it gives a very different more dissonant sound when you start with 4th like that, particularly because you get the strong bass from the E string on a note you probably don't want to emphasize. It generally doesn't sound good in "clean" music. Are you gonna play your A 002220 too - there's a reason people don't do these as often. It can sound pretty cool with some context but generally not in a straight forward song.

I'd rather move to 10th fret if I was really bad at A shape, but the key here is to practice the switch.