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#1
I just heard this recording of led zep for the first time. Some of it is a little rough and im not sure this was meant to be an album recording or anything but check out this solo.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4byppTBVCw
it starts at around 2:45. What is it about what he's playing that makes it sound so obscure? Theres parts where it sounds as if the solo is coming out of an atari or something. As weird as that sounds haha
Last edited by hanginout at Dec 20, 2013,
#2
Giving a quick listen, sounds like straight up pentatonic scale to me, with some "out" notes ocasionally. (Out means out of the pentatonic scale in this case) He's also using a slide. Don't know what you meant by obscure, so can't help you there
#3
He pretty much just plays the minor pentatonic scale and also uses the major third - basic blues thing, mixing minor and major.

What I think makes it sound so "obscure" is that he uses slide. I don't think it sounded any strange.

Usually it's not just the note choice that makes something sound the way it sounds. Notes are overrated.

What I mean, people think too much about which scales some people use. Everybody uses the same 12 notes. What makes them sound different is usually something else than the note choice.

My point is, you won't sound like Jimmy Page if you use the blues scale and the major third. Jimmy Page could play whatever notes and still sound like Jimmy Page. It's not in the notes you use.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 20, 2013,
#4
Okay makes sense. It's not the scale, its just a really smart way to use the notes in combination. Just sounded super cool to me so I thought it had to be some tricky music theory thing.
Anyhow, the part that really stuck out to me I think is at 3:22. He plays this series of 5 notes 3 times. Give it a listen. I remember reading about how certain things build emotion in songs. I don't know if that built emotion but something about that interval seemed like it went really well with the rest of the solo. Can you hear what I'm talking about with this part or am I just crazy haha. I guess it might be better to listen from a little earlier for effect.

Heres the link again http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4byppTBVCw
#5
The lick he plays is 5 1 3 b3 2 in scale degrees. And the song is in E so it's B E G# G F#.

I don't hear anything special in that but that's just me.

I think it may be in the rhythm he plays it (8th triplets). And the fact that he repeats it three times. Repeating a lick kind of means "this is important".
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#6
In addition to what they're saying, it occasionally sounded like he was doing the whole "bend the flat 3rd a quarter tone sharp" thing, which is sort of instant blues when you do it.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
That's cool you're able to figure out licks like that. Have you always been able to do that or did it come with ear training?
#9
This is my humble opinion. I doubt Jimmy Page studied the Solfege method. I highly doubt it. He was self-taught in guitar and went to art school and not music school. I believe a guy like Jimmy Page has a fun time with guitar. So, just have fun with guitar.

If you want to sound like him just buy the tab and study it. If it's one of his more obscure songs not tabbed out then pay someone to tab it out--let them bother with ear training.
#10
Quote by antics32
This is my humble opinion. I doubt Jimmy Page studied the Solfege method. I highly doubt it. He was self-taught in guitar and went to art school and not music school. I believe a guy like Jimmy Page has a fun time with guitar. So, just have fun with guitar.

If you want to sound like him just buy the tab and study it. If it's one of his more obscure songs not tabbed out then pay someone to tab it out--let them bother with ear training.

clearly the guy wants to learn how to play like this, so the most effective method is to train his ear - this leads to the aforementioned "fun with guitar" rather than him outsourcing all the work and ending up with 173 more occurrences of "well shit, this sounds good but i have to pay someone because my ears don't do anything"

i can't understand why you'd suggest it's ever better to pay somebody to do the stuff that's gonna help him be a better player and learn how to play what he hears
#11
lol I know I'm not gonna be jimmy paige but he's a phenomenal artist so yeah it's kinda hard to not wish for a sound like that. That said I'd feel kinda lame just getting a tab and playing this solo like I came up with it. I think my goal is to help build my own style. I'm gonna pursue the ear training, thanks for the heads up
#12
Quote by hanginout
lol I know I'm not gonna be jimmy paige but he's a phenomenal artist so yeah it's kinda hard to not wish for a sound like that.

there's really no reason you couldn't sound like him if you trained your ear and worked at it

from a technical standpoint he's not a particularly outstanding player, so your only real barriers are your ear and current lack of experience playing with the style you want to work towards
Last edited by :-D at Dec 21, 2013,
#13
Quote by antics32
This is my humble opinion. I doubt Jimmy Page studied the Solfege method. I highly doubt it. He was self-taught in guitar and went to art school and not music school. I believe a guy like Jimmy Page has a fun time with guitar. So, just have fun with guitar.

If you want to sound like him just buy the tab and study it. If it's one of his more obscure songs not tabbed out then pay someone to tab it out--let them bother with ear training.

I'm pretty sure Jimmy didn't know about solfege when he learned to play. If we come up with new, more effective methods, why shouldn't we use them (well, solfege isn't that new, but still)? Actually everybody who plays by ear uses some kind of solfege. Solfege is about scale degrees, you just give the scale degrees more singable names (for example "Te" is easier to sing than "flat seventh"). It's all about recognizing the intervals/scale degrees.

Why wouldn't you want to train your ears? A trained ear is the best thing a musician can have. You don't need tab books any more. You can learn any song free. And you can have fun with your guitar even if you don't use tab books. I think I have more fun with guitar if I don't need to use tab books. I like figuring stuff out by myself and if something has a mistake in it, I want to play it the right way (and tab books do have mistakes in them). Your ear develops if you just use it. That's how the guys in the 60s did - they didn't have tabs or anything. They just listened to their favorite songs and played. Training your ear doesn't need to be boring.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
our boy's heart's in the right place

word to ear training. start with figuring out some easier solos (zeppelin, eric clapton, all that overtly pentatonic stuff is a great start) that you like by ear but start by finding your 'tonic'

thats your I chord, your root, whatever you wanna call it. It's the least tense, most stable sounding chord. Like in stairway to heaven, the 'tonic' chord is an Am.

and then try to hear the other notes in relation to that root. b3 and 5 will probably come the most easily. (bonus points if you ask yourself 'why is that?' and try to figure out why with this or any other thing you come across)

that's about how I got my ear going. then you fill in a minor pentatonic scale, eventually you add easier notes to hear and tendency tones (major 3 and natural 7, respectively) until you start to have an idea of what each note could sound like in relation to that root or tonic or I

and then you learn music that actually has chord changes and start pulling your hair out. it's one hell of a ride, have a blast kid
#15
Quote by hanginout
That's cool you're able to figure out licks like that. Have you always been able to do that or did it come with ear training?


the other guys are probably better at it than i am

I dunno. I used to do ear training for piano (as a little bit of it was in the exams), but i've never really religiously sat down with a guitar and said, "right, now i'm gonna do some ear training".

that being said, i try to come up with my own licks and play what's in my head, so i suppose in a way that's ear training. And i listen to tons of lead guitar.

but yeah it definitely gets better with practice. I think i've always had a decentish ear, but when i played piano i couldn't let rip guitar licks at will either

The other thing I'd say it- tabs/music *or* ear training is a false dichotomy. You can use both. In fact, I'd argue using both is possibly the best method. If you jump in at the deep end it'll likely just discourage you, whereas using tabs (but also using your ears while using them) will let you see how guitar players tend to play things, and sooner or later you'll start to recognise what guitar players are doing just by listening.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Dec 21, 2013,
#16
Quote by antics32
This is my humble opinion. I doubt Jimmy Page studied the Solfege method. I highly doubt it. He was self-taught in guitar and went to art school and not music school. I believe a guy like Jimmy Page has a fun time with guitar. So, just have fun with guitar.

If you want to sound like him just buy the tab and study it. If it's one of his more obscure songs not tabbed out then pay someone to tab it out--let them bother with ear training.


Jimmy Page did not become Jimmy Page by letting someone else "bother with ear training". Like every other good player, he likely sat at home with his records hacking out licks for hours every night.

You can't become a decent musician without using your ears.
#17
Fine, maybe I was too harsh. I'm not going to bother with ear training. The closest I'll get to ear training is buying a fake book--a skeleton of a tab--and listening to the record and figuring out the details.

The TS asked what mode Jimmy Page used. I don't believe Jimmy Page like Jimmy Hendrix even knew what a mode was much less Solfege methods or what have you. I'm just demystifying music.
#18
Quote by antics32
Fine, maybe I was too harsh. I'm not going to bother with ear training. The closest I'll get to ear training is buying a fake book--a skeleton of a tab--and listening to the record and figuring out the details.


Have fun being shitty Youtube Metal guitarist #523180853 who can only play scales and sweep patterns.
#19
Quote by Morphogenesis26
Have fun being shitty Youtube Metal guitarist #523180853 who can only play scales and sweep patterns.


I don't know what that means but all I know is that I'm way happier than anyone who would post that. Going back to Jimmy Page much less Jimmy Hendrix, which is what this thread is about, he probably didn't know any scales outside of pentatonic or sweeps in the first place.

I know exactly what's going to happen to the TS if he follows the advice on here. He's going to learn the number method, ear training, modes by the number pattern, then get into chord progressions...then, in five years when he learns it all he is going to be on here grumpy...then he is going to start a thread about how he can't write a song.

Here are my songs and I'm just a happy hobbyist:

Rain Drops:
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/rain-drops

Angels in Space
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/angels-in-space

And others, it's all major but no sweeps and no scales. Man up, let me hear your sound.
#20
Quote by antics32
I don't know what that means but all I know is that I'm way happier than anyone who would post that. Going back to Jimmy Page much less Jimmy Hendrix, which is what this thread is about, he probably didn't know any scales outside of pentatonic or sweeps in the first place.

I know exactly what's going to happen to the TS if he follows the advice on here. He's going to learn the number method, ear training, modes by the number pattern, then get into chord progressions...then, in five years when he learns it all he is going to be on here grumpy...then he is going to start a thread about how he can't write a song.

Here are my songs and I'm just a happy hobbyist:

Rain Drops:
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/rain-drops

Angels in Space
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/angels-in-space

And others, it's all major but no sweeps and no scales. Man up, let me hear your sound.


Hey, let's all be friends here Although I do agree with you in that Jimmy Page and Hendrix probably never heard of modes and the like, I disagree on what you say about the ear training. What's wrong with using your ears? Isn't that what creating music is all about? If one decides to follow a complete method with steps already pre-determined that's his choice, but what we're all saying is that if you drop the tabs and start using your ears it will be much more rewarding musically. You start to play in your own way, you start to pay attention to what you're playing, you grow a lot as a musician in that way. No need to confine yourself in just one way.
Last edited by Lersch at Dec 21, 2013,
#21
Quote by antics32
I know exactly what's going to happen to the TS if he follows the advice on here. He's going to learn the number method, ear training, modes by the number pattern, then get into chord progressions...then, in five years when he learns it all he is going to be on here grumpy...then he is going to start a thread about how he can't write a song.


See, whats funny about this is that most of the regulars here decry modes and specifically learning shapes and patterns as detrimental to a musician's growth.

Developing your ear allows you to not only not rely on tabs but also take the sounds going on in your head and put them to paper, or dissect ideas and musical concepts in the music you enjoy and assimilate it into your own. Why you wouldn't want to learn this method is beyond me.

Here are my songs and I'm just a happy hobbyist:

Rain Drops:
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/rain-drops

Angels in Space
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/angels-in-space

And others, it's all major but no sweeps and no scales. Man up, let me hear your sound.


Since this site caters, generally, to Metal and Rock musicians, it was an assumption on my part that you would be one of those Metal musicians who learn their scales and arpeggios without a developed ear or musical knowledge of any sort. The basis for my statement was that you'll be "wondering how to write a song" as you put it due to your lack of a developed ear and your own laziness.

Posting clips and causing a dick measuring contest isn't what I'm about to participate in.
#22
Quote by Lersch
Hey, let's all be friends here Although I do agree with you in that Jimmy Page and Hendrix probably never heard of modes and the like, I disagree on what you say about the ear training. What's wrong with using your ears? Isn't that what creating music is all about? If one decides to follow a complete method with steps already pre-determined that's his choice, but what we're all saying is that if you drop the tabs and start using your ears it will be much more rewarding musically. You start to play in your own way, you start to pay attention to what you're playing, you grow a lot as a musician in that way. No need to confine yourself in just one way.


No, I completely agree. That's why I backed off my comment. Thanks for the civil reply.
#23
Quote by antics32
I know exactly what's going to happen to the TS if he follows the advice on here. He's going to learn the number method, ear training, modes by the number pattern, then get into chord progressions...then, in five years when he learns it all he is going to be on here grumpy...then he is going to start a thread about how he can't write a song.

if he follows the advice given to him, he's going to become a more competent musician. that's really all there is to it. your list is inaccurate so there's no point in discussing that particular part of it, but he's not going to become some sort of a grumpy robot or whatever you seem to be implying here simply because he decided to take a deeper look at what's going on

i think people are just confused as to why you're holding so tightly onto a viewpoint that essentially amounts to "it's pointless to care about learning what the hell you're doing" - if it works for you that's fine, but that doesn't make it a particularly useful solution in this case
Quote by antics32
And others, it's all major but no sweeps and no scales. Man up, let me hear your sound.

the "no scales" bit is incorrect
#24
Jimmy Page and Hendrix may not have known a lot of the technical jargon when it came to playing chords and scales etc, but they no doubt recognized certain sounds and could play them. Listen to Purple Haze. There are notes that fall outside of the pentatonic framework like the dorian sixth. Did Hendrix know what that was called? Probably not. Did he know how it sounded and where those sixths were? You bet! He knew what he was doing, but in a folkier sort of way.

This is not to say don't learn traditional theory and harmony. The beauty is that when you understand how music works and don't play it by wrote you can start transcending genres and styles, intelligently write your own songs, communicate your ideas in a group more effectively and of course play more intelligently. Why wouldn't you? It's a fascinating study, incredibly rewarding and makes everything easier in the long run!

If you're still interested in learning that b3 to major 3 sound, we just did a really in depth post on this at http://myguitarpal.com/?p=82 with two videos. The b3 leading to the major 3 is the first big step toward really playing over the chords and getting a real bluesy sound. It's one of those things you really want to get used to playing and hearing. Just playing your pentatonic or blues scales over a bunch of changing chords can sound pretty good, but it can also tend to wander.
Last edited by Bijingus at Dec 21, 2013,
#25
^ Yeah, Page and Hendrix knew the sound. They may not have known what the sounds were called (though I'm sure they knew the basic chord names). But that's not necessary. If you know the sounds and how to use them, that's pretty much it. I would say Page and Hendrix only played by ear. They couldn't read notation and back then I'm not sure how common tabs were. But yeah, back then there was no UG or tab books of Led Zeppelin or Hendrix songs because, well, the songs weren't written yet.

They may have not known what the collection of notes (scale) they played was called but so what? Again, they knew how it sounded like. They used their ears and had good ears. Today it's too easy. You don't need to have a good ear and can play very challenging songs. Actually you don't need to know the sound at all to be able to play advanced songs. You can just use tabs for everything. But what do you do when you want to write your own songs? Or play your own solos? You need a good ear to do that.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#26
But what do you do when you want to write your own songs? Or play your own solos? You need a good ear to do that.


Agreed!

Today it's too easy. You don't need to have a good ear and can play very challenging songs. Actually you don't need to know the sound at all to be able to play advanced songs. You can just use tabs for everything.


It sure is a lot easier when you understand and hear what is happening underneath though. A couple examples I use with some of my students are Rumble by Link Ray and Shakin' All Over. Both have those open position E minor pentatonic licks just running down the scale. After they've learned the scale they can pick up the lines in a matter of seconds sometimes because they already have they collection of notes and fingerings right under their fingers and have the sound of the scale in their head. Same with Back in Black by ACDC or Green River by CCR. If you go straight to the tabs chances are you won't see the relationship between these songs and they we be seen and learned as something completely separate. Not to mention you'll never be able to lift or alter those licks and incorporate them into your own playing.
#27
I respect the input of everyone who posted in here. I actually was one of those guys who literally knew absolutely nothing about any kind of theory up until i started reading stuff on this site. Usually my sessions consist of me just sitting there and starting with a note and coming up with something that sounds good to me. i'm fairly happy about what I've been able to do but I think that without the theory i've hit sort of a plateau. I don't want to not get better and certainly don't want to get worse so that's why I'm here!

One thing I will say is that sometimes when I am screwing around and just guessing and trying to play by feel I feel like I come up with cooler and more unique stuff? Anyone else notice this at all? Like If i sit there trying to think about theory I often play worse than if i just go by instinct.
#28
Quote by hanginout
I respect the input of everyone who posted in here. I actually was one of those guys who literally knew absolutely nothing about any kind of theory up until i started reading stuff on this site. Usually my sessions consist of me just sitting there and starting with a note and coming up with something that sounds good to me. i'm fairly happy about what I've been able to do but I think that without the theory i've hit sort of a plateau. I don't want to not get better and certainly don't want to get worse so that's why I'm here!

One thing I will say is that sometimes when I am screwing around and just guessing and trying to play by feel I feel like I come up with cooler and more unique stuff? Anyone else notice this at all? Like If i sit there trying to think about theory I often play worse than if i just go by instinct.


With humility, you're getting it. What you call instinct I call your ear and I call playing by the heart. Play from your heart. Theory is good when it teaches you something new. Theory is good when it inspires you. Theory is good when it sparks creativity. Theory becomes not so good when it becomes a rigid rule that must be obeyed at the sacrifice of the heart. So, don't lose your heart along the way learning theory.
#29
Quote by antics32
Theory becomes not so good when it becomes a rigid rule that must be obeyed at the sacrifice of the heart. So, don't lose your heart along the way learning theory.

alright this shit's now progressed to the point where you're just incorrectly commenting on something because you don't know enough about it to form a reasonable opinion
#30
Quote by :-D
alright this shit's now progressed to the point where you're just incorrectly commenting on something because you don't know enough about it to form a reasonable opinion


Post your sound please. I do this for the thread starter and not me. Post your sound. If it's better than mine, I'll post something better than that.

I think I need to start a thread in Musician Talk, "Post your sound: Man up is it all talk and no play."
#31
Quote by antics32
Post your sound please. I do this for the thread starter and not me. Post your sound. If it's better than mine, I'll post something better than that.

https://soundcloud.com/ecarlstrom

haven't used that site in two years, but go nuts and listen to whatever you want. i'll also tell you that i'm not posting this to make any comments about either my music or its perceived quality relative to yours since all this is subjective anyway.

i'm posting it because "post sound clips or i refuse to listen to you" is an absolutely awful attitude, and if you identify yourself as a "happy hobbyist" you should be willing to admit that there's probably some stuff out there that you don't know all that well

i hope you see how flawed your line of thinking in the above quote is, because why would you "post something better than that"? if you're not posting the best advice you've got then i don't know what you're doing

it's not as though we're competing for a video game high score here or something - using "oh this guy didn't post random .mp3's, his opinion's worthless" as your sole criterion makes no sense
#32
Look for the thread starter. I'm currently studying a theory book which I know is very good. I'm not a hypocrite; I'm not going to follow it rigidly and I'm just picking up ideas as I go along but here:

Section 3 Chord Sequences:
"Many guitarists write songs without knowing the theory behind the chords they use--they simply rely on their ears: if it sounds good it works. Sometimes during composition a turn of melody or a riff suggests an unusual chord change, and you later discover you have included a chord that is not strictly, 'in key.' If it fits in the context of the song, that's fine. The history of music is littered with broken rules, on the otherside of which is great music. "

Pg. 37 How to Write Songs on Guitar A Guitar Playing and Songwriting Course.
by Rikky Rooksby
#33
Quote by :-D
https://soundcloud.com/ecarlstrom

haven't used that site in two years, but go nuts and listen to whatever you want. i'll also tell you that i'm not posting this to make any comments about either my music or its perceived quality relative to yours since all this is subjective anyway.

i'm posting it because "post sound clips or i refuse to listen to you" is an absolutely awful attitude, and if you identify yourself as a "happy hobbyist" you should be willing to admit that there's probably some stuff out there that you don't know all that well

i hope you see how flawed your line of thinking in the above quote is, because why would you "post something better than that"? if you're not posting the best advice you've got then i don't know what you're doing

it's not as though we're competing for a video game high score here or something - using "oh this guy didn't post random .mp3's, his opinion's worthless" as your sole criterion makes no sense


It's all synth music right? I don't think I need to comment.
#34
if you're using "synth music" to mean that i used vst's, then yes - none of that was written with anything other than musical notation, ears and a brain though

if you think the fact that i wrote stuff for entire orchestras is somehow nullified by the fact that people aren't playing it live in that recording and it's therefore less valuable to this discussion than your sound clips, then you're more misguided than i originally thought
#35
Quote by :-D
if you're using "synth music" to mean that i used vst's, then yes - none of that was written with anything other than musical notation, ears and a brain though

if you think the fact that i wrote stuff for entire orchestras is somehow nullified by the fact that people aren't playing it live in that recording and it's therefore less valuable to this discussion than your sound clips, then you're more misguided than i originally thought


To the moderators, this is all for the thread starter. So, I'm not going to argue but I will point out this is forum is called, "ULTIMATE GUITAR." If you are going to comment on guitar theory to someone who is impressionable than at least play guitar.
#36
Quote by antics32
To the moderators, this is all for the thread starter. So, I'm not going to argue but I will point out this is forum is called, "ULTIMATE GUITAR." If you are going to comment on guitar theory to someone who is impressionable than at least play guitar.

what gives you the impression that i don't play guitar?

this is not "guitar theory". there is no such thing as "guitar theory" in the sense you're using this term. even if there were, this discussion wouldn't be about "guitar theory" since it's about general musical concepts

tossing around pointless ad hominem arguments that aren't even correct doesn't make anything you're saying accurate in any way
#37
Quote by antics32
To the moderators, this is all for the thread starter. So, I'm not going to argue but I will point out this is forum is called, "ULTIMATE GUITAR." If you are going to comment on guitar theory to someone who is impressionable than at least play guitar.

This is the music theory forum. There is no guitar theory, there is no piano theory, there is no English horn theory. Music theory is music theory. Just because one author writes horror novels doesn't mean they can't give advice on story to a fantasy writer.

You're making a fool of yourself. Theory is description. There is no "going against" theory because there is a way to describe whatever it is you're doing with theory. The way theory is best used when composing is "write with your ear, figure it out with theory, then go from there."
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
Last edited by rockingamer2 at Dec 21, 2013,
#38
Quote by rockingamer2
This is the music theory forum. There is no guitar theory, there is no piano theory, there is no English horn theory. Music theory is music theory. Just because one author writes horror novels doesn't mean they can't give advice on story to a fantasy writer.

You're making a fool of yourself. Theory is description. There is no "going against" theory because there is a way to describe whatever it is you're doing with theory.

excuse me, where are your random guitar noodling mp3's? who can take you seriously without them?
#39
Quote by :-D
excuse me, where are your random guitar noodling mp3's? who can take you seriously without them?


I've posted them in this thread:

Here again. I produced what you produced with a real guitar and amp and not VIRTUAL SOUND TECHNOLOGY and noodling as you requested good sir

Rain Drops:
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/rain-drops

Angels in Space:
https://soundcloud.com/henry-faith/angels-in-space
#40
Quote by rockingamer2
"write with your ear, figure it out with theory, then go from there."


No disagreement here. Thanks for the input.
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