#1
I've been playing for 20ish years, not all of them as seriously as I should have. I'm a decent blues lead player, but sloppy and my picking leaves a lot to desire.

Buckethead is the top of the mountain for me, in terms of picking. He's just so fluid, accurate and fast. I love listening and watching his playing so much, it's awe inspiring.

How do i begin the journey to get to the top of that mountain? What do i focus on?
I do a lot of work with a metronome on pentatonics, but i still feel sloppy and inaccurate.

Any tips for me?
#2
pebber brown, who was one of buckethead's teachers, uploads picking lessons to youtube

you should check him out
#3
Listen to some paul gilbert see all his lesson on youtube and you will be on your way to a great player buckethead is great but paul is his is teacher after all and in my opinion paul knows more. as far as soloing he does that lick that paul showed him endlessly in minor scales lol. learn some buckethead riffs as well! pebber brown is good but imo this style of practicing leads no where he doesnt sound any musical to me atleast. Paul Gilbert really is the real deal if your interested in learning to play fast and good
Last edited by ibzshredder at Dec 20, 2013,
#4
Quote by RyanMW2010
I've been playing for 20ish years, not all of them as seriously as I should have. I'm a decent blues lead player, but sloppy and my picking leaves a lot to desire.

Buckethead is the top of the mountain for me, in terms of picking. He's just so fluid, accurate and fast. I love listening and watching his playing so much, it's awe inspiring.

How do i begin the journey to get to the top of that mountain? What do i focus on?
I do a lot of work with a metronome on pentatonics, but i still feel sloppy and inaccurate.

Any tips for me?


Stop playing at any speed where it feels sloppy. Slow down and get it rght first. From there the next stage is to study buckethead's playing and try to get a handle on what you think makes him sound the way he does.

It will take a long time to sound at all like him but there you go.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
I'm watching Pebber Brown's videos. In this one, he talks about scalpal and sarod picking where he moves his thumb around a bunch. I've always heard this was counter-intuitive to speed and that you want as few moving pieces as possible--that movement should only come from the wrist. What's the conventional wisdom here?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thx-HKhb-X8
#6
Quote by RyanMW2010
I'm watching Pebber Brown's videos. In this one, he talks about scalpal and sarod picking where he moves his thumb around a bunch. I've always heard this was counter-intuitive to speed and that you want as few moving pieces as possible--that movement should only come from the wrist. What's the conventional wisdom here?


The general wisdom is that wrist only movement is the way to go. Don't lock the thumb; if it moves in sympathy with the rest of your hand then that's fine but it shouldn't be providing thing actual picking motion.

Additionally if you watch Pebber he's actually not practicing what he preaches when he plays at speed anyway; there's barely any thumb motion going on at all and it's certainly not what's propelling the pick through the strings. He does that a lot; says one thing and does another.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#8
Prepare to practice a lot. Being able to recreate that fluidity without any mistakes... I can't imagine how many years of solid practice that would require. Of course as others said, the fastest way there is to do what Zaphod_Beeblebr said. You have to iron out every mistake forever.
#9
Probably have to slow down and re-learn a lot of basics if you're sloppy, I had to do that. I wish I had taken the time to learn to play more economically, originally paying little attention to technique.
#10
Quote by Tempoe
Probably have to slow down and re-learn a lot of basics if you're sloppy, I had to do that. I wish I had taken the time to learn to play more economically, originally paying little attention to technique.


A lot of the time I worry that my technique is flawed. I watch all the videos I can and try to pay attention but I'm still not sure what I'm doing is right. I can't afford lessons right now w/ the holiday season either. I hope I'm not doing more harm than good because I love practicing and I want to be great.