#1
So after wanting a headless bass for a while one has finally become availible and so have the funds. Only problem is...it's a hundred odd miles up country and so I can't try it out first, normally I wouldn't even think about it but after all it is a pretty rare bass. It's the double humbucket version in a kinda woody/cherry version, it comes with a hard case and all in all it's going to cost me around £350 to get it to me.

Just wondering what people think of this bass? Is it worth te money, how versatile are they, do they suit a particular style of music/playing, any noteworthy musicians use them(apart from Mark King of course) ? Any help is appreciated and if anyone knows of any decent reviews or vids that would be splendid.

And I also know that steinberger still produce a headless bass but quite frankly I hate the body shape.

Thankyou very much for any help
#2
The "headless" bass and guitar thing had a short day in the sun during the 1980s. They looked "different" in the music videos of the day. Some musicians took a great liking to them - Mark King on bass and Allan Holdsworth on guitar, for example. Most others have moved on from them, but if you like them, then go for it.

Hohner's headless basses were (and I suppose still are) licensed by Steinberger. "The Jack" came in a couple of different varieties. Most of the ones I saw were set-neck, two humbuckers, and some pretty nice wood for the body. They were solid instruments that looked pretty good. Other versions had two Fender Jazz-type pickups and solid color finishes. I did not like those as much. Depending on the version, a Hohner "The Jack" bass would make a good addition to your bass arsenal. In the U.S.A., used ones go for around US$300.00 to $350.00.
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