#1
So it seems like the mahogany supply really is running out. The studio was supposed to be exactly the same as the standard just with cosmetic differences but now the neck is maple.

Also now they brought back the melody maker for like $560. The means that with some luck they'll eventually be available used for $250-$300 which is great for a Gibson.

They also have a Gibson LPJ which is pretty similar to the studio for $700.

I'm not too happy that studios now use maple necks but whatever.
Here's a link to the 2013 models
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/pages/gibson-usa-2014?source=3XFCBK1
My Electric Guitars:
Ibanez GSA60
Ibanez RG3EXFM1
Peavey Raptor Plus
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Squire Telecaster Affinity (Has many famous musicians signatures so only played once)
#2
Their mahogany supply is not running out at all. They just chose to use maple necks instead of mahogany necks. There is nothing wrong with using maple as a neck material whatsoever.
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#3
Gibson had a flirtation with maple necks back in the late 1980s. Some people liked them; some did not, and a lot of people did not notice any real difference (except a bit more weight). Zakk Wylde clearly liked the maple necks - his signature Les Paul Custom is still made with one, long after Gibson had abandoned them on their Les Paul guitars.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#4
I've actually seen LP customs have maple necks which date back to the 70's
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#5
Actually, the real top of the line guitars at Gibson have traditionally had maple (usually multipiece) necks. Check out the HIGH end archtops and even the L5S, etc.

OTOH, the current Melody Makers and LPJ things are, IMHO, junque guitars when compared to what's available from offshore manufacturers in the same price range. If they didn't say Gibson on the headstock, we'd be laughing at them.
#6
Quote by shounakghosh7
So it seems like the mahogany supply really is running out.


Mahogany is not running out and was never threatened. Long ago Honduras Mahogany was replanted throughout Asia and has been merrily growing tall and strong both wild and on plantations ever since. It's the very same mahogany that went into the original '59 burst. Tons and tons and acres of board feet, and it's The Good Stuff.

Maple is cheaper and relatively local. And Gibson is cheaping out on its low end guitars every way that it can think of, eliminating everything but the look of the guitars. They're even producing some of those humbuckers (the ones in the plastic shells?) in the cheapest possible way. The minihumbuckers on some of those guitars are nothing like the original Epiphone-based humbuckers used in the first Deluxes, nothing like the Firebird pickups, not even anything like the Johnny Smith pickups, all of which are different versions of minihums. The ones on the new cheapos have found a way to make these things even more cheaply (and they don't sound as good) than anything they've done before. The guitars that are selling for $700 are being produced for well under a tenth of that.
#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Their mahogany supply is not running out at all. They just chose to use maple necks instead of mahogany necks. There is nothing wrong with using maple as a neck material whatsoever.


It's not that there is anything wrong with maple, it's more the principle that the Studio is supposed to be a bare bones LP without the bells and whistles. Now it isn't.

Maple is probably cheaper for them but I doubt this will be reflected in the price the consumer pays.
#8
Quote by MegadethFan18
It's not that there is anything wrong with maple, it's more the principle that the Studio is supposed to be a bare bones LP without the bells and whistles.

But there has existed LP Customs with maple necks which date back to the 70's. So it isn't like the change has really put a damper on the guitar's authenticity compared to what could be considered a 'vintage' guitar. Just not in a way that is quite as commonly known.
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#9
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
But there has existed LP Customs with maple necks which date back to the 70's. So it isn't like the change has really put a damper on the guitar's authenticity compared to what could be considered a 'vintage' guitar.


That's an exception that goes against what is now the established standard. People won't accept a St. Anger 2 "just because" there was a St. Anger 1.

If all LPs are going to have maple necks the Studio will still be a LP without the bells and whistles. Lets not get it twisted as dspellman said it's likely just a cost cutting method otherwise they'd call it something like "The 70's Custom Tribute Studio" and plug the whole 70's tribute thing. Instead they'll probably keep quite about it, I doubt they are going to act like the maple will enhance the guitar.

Different strokes of course, I'd rather the Mahogany neck that doesn't mean I think you should.
#10
Quote by MegadethFan18
That's an exception that goes against what is now the established standard. People won't accept a St. Anger 2 "just because" there was a St. Anger 1.

Yeah, that is a really, really bad example.

If all LPs are going to have maple necks the Studio will still be a LP without the bells and whistles. Lets not get it twisted as dspellman said it's likely just a cost cutting method otherwise they'd call it something like "The 70's Custom Tribute Studio" and plug the whole 70's tribute thing. Instead they'll probably keep quite about it, I doubt they are going to act like the maple will enhance the guitar.

Different strokes of course, I'd rather the Mahogany neck that doesn't mean I think you should.

A prefer mahogany necks as well, and maple probably is used as a cost-cutting method because quartersawn mahogany necks are relatively expensive. But just because it is doesn't mean that the guitar should be seen as inferior to anything else. Many guitarists revere the sound of a 70's LP. Zakk Wylde and Randy Rhoads do in their maple-necked LP's for example, and those are extremely very-well known guitars.
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#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Yeah, that is a really, really bad example.


I just transposed what you said. Same melody, different key. So you're just saying what you said was really really bad. Which I agree with.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
A prefer mahogany necks as well, and maple probably is used as a cost-cutting method because quartersawn mahogany necks are relatively expensive. But just because it is doesn't mean that the guitar should be seen as inferior to anything else. Many guitarists revere the sound of a 70's LP. Zakk Wylde and Randy Rhoads do in their maple-necked LP's for example, and those are extremely very-well known guitars.


I agree, however it will be viewed as inferior. More expensive = better to most people. A table made of pine serves it's purpose as well as a table made of solid mahogany, they sure don't cost the same and the mahogany one will be seen as "better".
#12
Quote by MegadethFan18
I just transposed what you said. Same melody, different key. So you're just saying what you said was really really bad. Which I agree with.

No, I just said that the example you gave was in no way accurate to what I just said. Do I have to spoonfeed you with everything I say?

I agree, however it will be viewed as inferior. More expensive = better to most people. A table made of pine serves it's purpose as well as a table made of solid mahogany, they sure don't cost the same and the mahogany one will be seen as "better".
Let's base how good something is on how much it costs!

Popular view =/= accuracy
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#13
It's all good and well if some players prefer maple necks but the idea of the studio was that you're paying a third of the price but still getting the same sound for the studio, hence the name. Even if the lp studio is a good guitar, it's no longer the same guitar as the standard
My Electric Guitars:
Ibanez GSA60
Ibanez RG3EXFM1
Peavey Raptor Plus
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Squire Telecaster Affinity (Has many famous musicians signatures so only played once)
#14
They might just be trying to sell maple neck Les Pauls to people who already have a few with mahogany necks and need an excuse to buy another one. If you read the long copy descriptions of guitars on Gibson.com it’s pretty clear they’re always trying to create repeat customers.
#15
If you played a 2012 and 2013 side by side, I'd really doubt you would notice the newer one has a maple neck . My SVK has a maple neck and feels just as authentic as a legitimate LP Standard.
Endorsed by Dean Guitars 07-10
2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]