#1
Here we go again ...

In standard guitar 'tuning / the sheet music is written in the key of: C, and the 'pitch, is too high. If I tune the strings of E,A,D,G,B,E, To: D,G,C,F,A,D, or use a 'Capo, and use the same positions as written, am I now in a different Mode?

Or/ is the Mode only changed, when I compensate the Key C Major Scale
of the I, III, V with the Root Scale of D?, which would be II, IV, Vi. ?

The C' Major Scale has no ( flats or sharps )...Does the D Dorian Mode
NOW, have 2 #'s, as does the Key of D'?

OR/ am I overthinking the whole / simplified Mode, Thing/
Last edited by Gatro1369 at Dec 21, 2013,
#2
Moved to MT
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#3
No, if you simply detune the guitar a whole step, then what was C in E tuning is now Bb. No mode change or implications at all.


The mode doesn't change at all when you "compensate" with a root scale of D. You're simply plaing D major instead of C major. Nothing modal to this.

D Dorian would likely be shown under a C Key signature, if you wanted to simplify the inclusion or exclusion of sharps.

Best,

Sean
#4
So let's say you play the third fret of your A string. That's C in standard tuning. Now if you tune down to D, that note becomes a Bb. So if you play the whole scale with the same fingerings as C major in standard tuning, the scale now becomes Bb major scale.

If you use capo on the 2nd fret in standard tuning and now play the 3rd fret of A string (assuming that the open string with capo is the "zero fret"), the note you play is D. And if you play the C major scale fingerings, it becomes D major scale.

What key you are in is about the chords you play over. If the chords are C-F-G-C and you play any notes, you are playing in C major. The notes may not all be in C major scale (notes outside of the scale are called accidentals) but you are still in the key of C major all the time.
Quote by AlanHB
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#5
Quote by Sean0913
No, if you simply detune the guitar a whole step, then what was C in E tuning is now Bb. No mode change or implications at all.


The mode doesn't change at all when you "compensate" with a root scale of D. You're simply plaing D major instead of C major. Nothing modal to this.

D Dorian would likely be shown under a C Key signature, if you wanted to simplify the inclusion or exclusion of sharps.

Best,

Sean

would this be similar to a 'Slash CHORD, wherein a 'C Major, now becomes a C/D with the Major having a D for the root of the C chord?
#6
^no. Nothing he said is similar to a slash chord.

When you tune your guitar down, or use a capo you transpose the song to a different key. It does not change your mode.

For example. A singer has a voice that is more comfortable in the key of Bb major. The original song was in C major but it is "pitched too high" for his voice. The band then shifts every note in the song down a whole step...the song is now in Bb major and more comfortable for the singer to sing. The song has been transposed down a whole step from the key of C major to the key of Bb major.

Depending on what key the song is to be transposed to the guitarist might tune their guitar down, or use a capo. IF the song were modal to begin with, say in A Mixolydian, once transposed it will still be Mixolydian, the mode won't change, it would be in G Mixolydian or whatever. The tonic will change but the mode would stay the same.

This is not similar to a slash chord. A slash chord is simply a chord played over a different bass note. C/D for example is a C major chord played over a D bass. Transposing is different in that it would change ALL the notes of the C major chord so the C major chord would become a D major chord.
Si
#8
It sounds like you should focus on the basic major scale first. When you get to a point where modes are useful, they'll be there to learn.

Start by learning how to construct a major scale, and then work out all 12 of them on paper. Then on the guitar.
#9
How would changing the tuning of your guitar change the mode you're playing in? It wouldn't. If you were originally in E standard and played C lydian; then tuned down to D standard, you would now be playing Bb lydian. As others have said, you should probably focus more on understanding the major scale and minor scale.

You're not ready for modes, if you don't understand that changing tuning would not change the mode.